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somebody

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« on: December 06, 2012, 12:26:31 PM »
Quote
Light rail gets the green light - first stage to run from University of NSW to the CBD

    EXCLUSIVE by Andrew Clennell
    The Daily Telegraph
    December 06, 2012 12:00AM
    37 comments

A STAGED construction of a light rail line from the University of NSW in Randwick to the CBD is expected to be announced, with a second line from Central to George St to be part two of the project.

Premier Barry O'Farrell will announce next week that work will start at the university and go to Central Station, followed by a commitment to build light rail from Central through George St to Circular Quay. The plan is expected to go to cabinet next week.

There now seems little hope of Infrastructure NSW's Nick Greiner and Paul Broad's idea of building a $2 billion bus tunnel under George St - instead of light rail.

While Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian was told to find savings for her George St light rail project, she is understood to be winning the argument.

The announcement will be seen as a compromise option which would keep Ms Berejiklian and Lord Mayor Clover Moore happy but avoid digging up Sydney during the next election.
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Sydney takes the long way home
COMPLAINTS about the cleanliness and efficiency of trains have risen but jumping in the car won't help with Sydney's afternoon peak hour.

The Transport Minister and Transport for NSW's preference had been for work to begin at the Quay - in George St - and make its way through to Central.

But many in the cabinet, including Roads Minister Duncan Gay, are opposed to light rail down George St amid fears it could create even further congestion.

There were also concerns another capital project would put the state's AAA credit rating at risk.

Ms Moore has promised $180 million towards the project if the George St leg goes ahead.

Government sources said the idea would be to start construction of the railway at UNSW and for it to travel to Randwick Racecourse and the SCG, then on to Central. After that, a second leg could be built down George St to the Quay.

The announcement of the new light rail line is expected to be part of the government's response to Infrastructure NSW's State Infrastructure Strategy, the Metro Strategy and Ms Berejiklian's Long Term Transport Masterplan.

University of NSW vice-chancellor Fred Hilmer urged the Premier to go with the Randwick-to-Central project first.

"Analysis shows the two projects should be considered independently," he said. "Less than 1 per cent of staff and students coming to UNSW commence their journey in the CBD - 85 per cent start from areas outside the eastern, CBD and inner-west suburbs, making Central Station by far the most important interchange point.

"We have the spine for the proposed light rail to Randwick and the University."
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/light-rail-gets-the-green-light-first-stage-to-run-from-university-of-nsw-to-the-cbd/story-e6freuy9-1226530812380
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 09:43:25 AM by ozbob »

somebody

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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2012, 02:20:31 PM »
Also from the SMH:
Quote
Light rail the route to higher property prices

Date
    December 6, 2012 - 1:05PM

Stephen Nicholls
Property Editor

Experts say plans for light rail between the CBD and the University of NSW will boost property prices along the route.

The state government is expected to announce next week the first stage of a light rail plan that is set to reinvigorate Sydney's public transport network.

It is also expected to commit to the second stage - lord mayor Clover Moore and the public's favoured option of light rail between Central and Circular Quay along George Street.

The stage-one route is likely to run from Central, through Surry Hills, to the SCG, and up Anzac Parade to Kensington and Kingsford.

Trams could also run to Alison Road, past Randwick Racecourse to the Prince of Wales Hospital.

Property valuer Simon Felich, director of Dyson Austen, said light rail would be a huge bonus for nearby homeowners.

"Infrastructure and public transport are critical to growth in suburbs and Randwick is one of the few suburbs that has a hospital, a university and a racecourse," he said.

"There is a need to move a vast volume of people and roads are only becoming more congested.

"If they are able to add to the current service levels to those areas I can only see that as a positive."

Mr Felich said it was difficult to predict "the exact percentage and movements" in prices that would follow.

The general manager of Herron Todd White, Michael McNamara, said the greatest impact from public transport projects was in suburbs that were "still in their upswing".

That had been the case in the inner west, where prices shot up in places such as North Annandale and Lilyfield when the light rail was introduced there.

"Places like Kingsford could do with a little more gentrification I suppose," Mr McNamara said.

He also believes that once the light rail is built, rents could escalate along Anzac Parade.

"That should mobilise investors, especially in the more affordable segments like apartments," he said. "Eventually that will filter through to prices."

Andrew Wilson, senior economist at Australian Property Monitors, said Kensington and Kingsford were "sleeper" suburbs and the light rail would bring about their transformation.

"You can be further out from the CBD without having to battle the traffic," Dr Wilson said.

"And those areas are ripe for redevelopment . . . there are a lot of brownfield sites there."
http://smh.domain.com.au/real-estate-news/light-rail-the-route-to-higher-property-prices-20121206-2ax6k.html

somebody

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« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2012, 04:22:44 PM »
Updated title of thread.

The LR hasn't gotten the green light at all.  It's going to cabinet this week.

Offline SurfRail

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« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2012, 05:55:02 PM »
Gladys is my favourite politician at the moment.  :-t
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somebody

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« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2012, 06:26:33 PM »
Gladys is my favourite politician at the moment.  :-t
Perhaps, but I can't see the reason for this line.  The buses have two way patronage in peak.  That will be broken with this.

Offline Stillwater

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« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2012, 06:50:50 PM »
SMH says light rail is going to be a boon to urban livings, with spin-offs for property values..... what would the Gold Coast Bulletin say - splash headline: WASTE OF MONEY!  Glady's folly!

Offline SurfRail

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« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2012, 07:37:30 PM »
Gladys is my favourite politician at the moment.  :-t
Perhaps, but I can't see the reason for this line.  The buses have two way patronage in peak.  That will be broken with this.

Not so sure.  Students outbound, workers inbound in the morning, and vice versa.  Sounds quite similar to our line.

They need to get the bus network right, and for that they should completely ignore whatever STA has to say.
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somebody

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« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2012, 09:53:39 PM »
The thing that I find mind blowing is that from what I can gather STA are aware of what is needed, but they just lack the impetus to push ahead with it.

Offline ozbob

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« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2012, 03:03:11 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Revealed: Sydney trams make a comeback
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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somebody

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« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2012, 08:51:25 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Revealed: Sydney trams make a comeback
Be nice if this article would tell us something we didn't already know.  Has cabinet actually green lighted it?  They don't say so.

somebody

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« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2012, 11:11:04 AM »
Quote
Forty per cent of George Street to be pedestrian-only zone in $1.6 billion Sydney tram plan

Date
    December 13, 2012 - 11:40AM

James Robertson and Jacob Saulwick

More than 50 years after trams last rattled from the city to Randwick, the state government has announced they will ride again.

Work on a $1.6 billion 12-kilometre track linking Circular Quay and Central, George Street, Moore Park and the University of NSW will begin in 2014.

"This is a once-in-a-generation project to revitalise the centre of Sydney by reducing congestion and offering a fast, attractive public transport option," the Premier, Barry O'Farrell, said.
George Street ... 40% will be pedestrian only.

George Street ... 40% will be pedestrian only. Photo: Peter Braig

Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian said: "Congestion on roads in the Sydney CBD and surrounding areas will only get worse as the number of jobs in the city grows and the population increases - we have to act now and in a significant way."
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It is likely that construction of the eastern section of the line, from Central Station to Randwick, will start first.

But the whole line will open at the one time. Construction will take between five and six years after starting in 2014.
Trams in the Sydney CBD. Click for more photos
Sydney's trams

Trams in the Sydney CBD.

    Trams in the Sydney CBD.
    A tram in Annandale. Booth Street, Annandale
    A tram travels up William Street towards Kings Cross in the 1930s.
    A tram bound for Chatswood is involved in an accident on the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1939.
    University students hold up the last Dulwich Hill tram on City Road in September 1957.
    Passengers crowd on to tram services at Taylor Square going to Bondi and Maroubra.
    A view of George Street from Grosvenor Street, looking northward to the Sydney Harbour Bridge that is under construction, 1931.
    Trams at Randwick racecourse.
    The Rozelle tram depot.
    A tram stop on Parramatta Road at Leichhardt.
    The tramway that once crossed the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
    The tramway that once crossed the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
    The tramway that once crossed the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
    View all 16 photos

The Government had been debating whether to run the trams through the streets of Surry Hills or in an underground tunnel. Ms Berejiklian said it had decided on a street-level option, with trams running down Devonshire Street.

This will save hundreds of millions of dollars, she said, but also had the benefit of providing another street level stop in Surry Hills. People travelling from Randwick to the City would lose a couple of minutes in travel time against the tunnel option.

About 40 per cent of George Street, between Bathurst and Hunter Street, will become a pedestrian-only zone.
No caption

Dusted off ... light rail solution.

The government estimates that it will take 24 minutes for passengers to travel from Randwick to Central Station and 15 minutes to get from Central to Circular Quay. It currently takes 30 minutes in peak hour to get from Central to Circular Quay .

The new light rail will be able to carry up to 9000 passengers an hour in each direction.

Bus overhaul

The government also announced an overhaul of the city's bus network to reduce the number of peak-hour buses in the CBD.

Bus reforms include improvements to interchanges, more cross-city routes and higher priority for buses. The government estimates this will mean 220 fewer buses enter the city per hour in peak morning traffic. During the busiest two hours of morning traffic, about 1500 buses normally converge on a few narrow and congested corridors in the middle of Sydney.

Airport congestion

The government also unveiled plans to reduce congestion around Sydney Airport, including building an underpass for the rail line at General Holmes Drive, making airport approach roads one way and widening Mill Pond Road.

"The NSW government does not support a second airport in the Sydney basin, which is why we need to ensure the existing asset is being fully utilised," the Premier said.

The projects will cost $300 million and take between three and five years to complete.

Mr O'Farrell and Ms Berejiklian made Thursday's announcement in Castle Hill, the site of an information centre for the north-west-rail-link.

In the announcement they not only released Transport for NSW's final transport masterplan, but also responded to a separate State Infrastructure Strategy written by Infrastructure NSW.

They endorsed Infrastructure NSW's main recommendation, the 33km WestConnex motorway.

But they dismissed its recommendation for an underground bus tunnel in Sydney's CBD to take the place of light rail. The chairman of Infrastructure NSW, Nick Greiner, said putting light rail in the city would only create a problem.

But Mr O'Farrell said on Thursday that the bus tunnel idea would have cost more for not as much benefit.

Randwick was one of the first destinations for Sydney's first tram network, soon after steam-powered trams were first introduced to the City in 1879.

"The first destination was Randwick Racecourse," said Robert Lee, a professor of History at the University of Western Sydney. "This really is history repeating itself."

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/forty-per-cent-of-george-street-to-be-pedestrianonly-zone-in-16-billion-sydney-tram-plan-20121213-2bb4j.html#ixzz2EtF4d9rC
24 minutes Central-Randwick.  Are they kidding?

Offline Jonno

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« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2012, 11:13:30 AM »
We already know but it is worth saying again "Nick Greiner is stuck in the 1960's and oblivious to the mess building motorways for 40 years has created across Sydney".

somebody

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« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2012, 11:32:19 AM »
Well I agree with him on this point.

The part that makes it even worse than expected is funnelling Eastern Suburbs passengers into George St.

Offline SurfRail

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« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2012, 11:10:37 PM »
^ That is my main problem with this.  Full trams replacing buses from the east, where are the buses from Parra Rd magically going to go? 

I like how they have paid some serious attention to simplifying bus operations with the new plan, but it seems to assume that bus movements will somehow reduce from all directions at the same time (wasn't clear if it was meant to also include post-NWRL commissioning, so few or zero Hillsbus services)

There should be light rail on George St, but you would think that would be for Parra Rd and that the eastern suburbs pax would go up say Castlereagh or some other alignment so eventually you can have a few corridors.
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« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2012, 10:18:23 AM »
Quote
Buses overhaul remains a riddle

Date
    December 14, 2012

Jacob Saulwick, James Robertson

A new tram plan for Sydney

NSW Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian announces a light rail network from Circular Quay to Kingsford and Randwick aimed at reducing congestion in the CBD.

BUS routes into and through Sydney's CBD will be overhauled as part of the government's commitment to light rail, but precise details remain scarce.

Releasing the state's 20-year transport masterplan on Thursday the Premier, Barry O'Farrell, and the Transport Minister, Gladys Berejiklian, unveiled plans to change the way buses work across the city.

George Street, which will be cleared of buses for the tram line, is the most obvious place the new philosophy will be implemented. But the logic, as mapped out in the 420-page document, is to extend across the city and involves running fewer bus routes, but more frequent bus services.
Buses ... light rail would mean fewer peak services.

Buses ... light rail would mean fewer peak services. Photo: Simon Alekna

One benefit of this is in attracting people to public transport by offering greater frequencies. Another appeal, particularly in the CBD, is to reduce congestion in crowded streets by running fewer half-empty buses through town.
Advertisement

The risk, of course, is in forcing people to change their long-standing travel habits. Putting light rail down George Street, for instance, might require people to transfer to a tram from bus services that currently run all the way into the city.

''We've spent a lot of time looking at how you would reconfigure the bus network,'' Ms Berejiklian said.

''It is very much a light rail and bus solution. We still need buses but you have to make sure the integration between buses and light rail works,'' she said.

In arguing for her plan the minister argued that the status quo was far from ideal. About 1500 buses crush into narrow corridors in the heart of the CBD, over two-hours of peak morning traffic and more than two-thirds of them run late. This number will increase by about 30 per cent over the next two decades.

Trams, according to figures provided by the government, run about 97 per cent on-time. And they carry greater numbers more efficiently.

''What light rail does is allow us to move more people more reliably more quickly,'' Ms Berejiklian said.

''One light rail vehicle carries about 300 people, which is the equivalent of five buses. Buses also get stuck in traffic, light rail doesn't,'' she said.

Of the 1500 buses entering the city in the morning peak, light rail will remove the need for about 180. It remains unclear what bus routes these will be.

Some remaining routes in the city will also be reconfigured, though the detail at this stage remain conceptual.

Elizabeth Street will become the new north-south spine, while Park and Druitt Streets will be devoted to buses travelling east and west.

Park Street will also serve as a major interchange.

The government is also promising improvements from an as-yet-unspecified number of extra cross-city bus services and upgraded interchanges.

Ms Berejiklian said she was prepared for the political fall-out from changing routes. ''We are prepared for whatever comes up against us in the future. I have been lobbied consistently by every expert, every stakeholder, about the benefits of light rail. We are absolutely confident this is the best solution.''

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/buses-overhaul-remains-a-riddle-20121213-2bcp1.html#ixzz2EysHsybe

somebody

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« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2012, 05:17:30 PM »
Gladys is my favourite politician at the moment.  :-t
I don't agree.

The final copy of the masterplan has come out and it remains with the "idea" of Metro-ifying the Bankstown line and to Hurstville but leaves out the Inner West.  Translation: No increase in capacity where it is needed and prevention of some moves.  Like having freight on the Illawarra line, that will no longer be possible.  Nor will Campbelltown via Sydenham.

Offline SurfRail

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« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2012, 11:24:01 PM »
She's not exactly Lannie, but can you honestly say any of the others are making as much of a decent impact?
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somebody

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« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2012, 10:25:40 AM »
She's not exactly Lannie, but can you honestly say any of the others are making as much of a decent impact?
Progress under Gladys:
Some AM X39 trips to use the ED
E86-9 AM to use Left Grosvenor St/Right George St
620/642/650/652 to use the Cahill in the AM
MyZone valid on light rail and Monorail
MyZone valid on Moore Park event buses
(I don't count the NWRL as progress)
Am I missing something?

Progress in Melbourne:
Frankston + one other line to go to 10 minute frequency
Bus service reviews

Progress in Adelaide
Bus reliability improvements
Electrification to Seaford

Not sure what is happening in Perth.

colinw

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« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2012, 02:30:56 PM »
Progress under Gladys: truncation of the Newcastle branch to Wickham.  History will not look kindly on her term if they spend a fortune on trams and the misbegotten half baked NWRL while nobbling the link to NSW's second city.

The only good thing about NSW transport planning is that it makes QLD look somewhat sensible in comparison.

somebody

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« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2012, 02:55:59 PM »
The only good thing about NSW transport planning is that it makes QLD look somewhat sensible in comparison.
Got a good laugh at this one: it's funny 'cause it's true.

I think the biggest risk to Glady's legacy is people deciding not to use public transport to reach the CBD because of the inconvenient interchange and the need to buy an expensive MyMulti 1.  Therefore choking the CBD with cars.  I guess similar in the NW but to travel that far the MyMulti 1 is not expensive.

Then there's the too small tunnels for the NWRL.

Offline SurfRail

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« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2012, 06:58:40 AM »
Part of me expects she doesn't necessarily support Newcastle closure but it might be a face-saving thing for Old Nick.  He gets his way up there and Cabinet gets to ignore his crap plans for the Sydney CBD (except for the blasted motorway tunnel).
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« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2012, 08:47:03 AM »
Simon,
The NWRL is progress, just because its not your prefered technology or route, especially after nearly 10 years of stuffing about.
Depends how you define progress.  A small amount of growth in PT use over quite a long period and a very expensive price tag?  If that meets the criteria of progress, then yes it is.  Or if you define it as more tracks being laid down, then it is also progress.

Have a look at charting transport to see the growth in PT use, on the journey to work criterion 2006-11.  Do you think we'll be seeing the same level of growth in Sydney 2011-21?  I don't.  Brisbane grew quite a bit too.

somebody

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« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2012, 02:54:40 PM »
Yeah well I don't see it like you, and I would say that the statistics support my approach.

Refer to Chartingtransport.com

Sydney doesn't have such egregious failures as Milton and to a lesser degree South Bank, but it certainly has room for improvement.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2012, 03:01:29 PM by Simon »

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« Reply #23 on: December 16, 2012, 05:50:22 PM »
Counter peak trains run out of service past intending passengers leaving them with only a 15 minute frequency.  Like only having a 15 minute frequency to North Sydney from Wynyard in the AM.

I suppose out of peak there are quite a number of egregious failures in Sydney, but one of my favourites is the Chatswood-Hornsby via MQP shuttles.

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« Reply #24 on: December 22, 2012, 06:40:13 PM »
Perhaps, but I can't see the reason for this line.  The buses have two way patronage in peak.  That will be broken with this.

Not so sure.  Students outbound, workers inbound in the morning, and vice versa.  Sounds quite similar to our line.

They need to get the bus network right, and for that they should completely ignore whatever STA has to say.
The only way this line will have two way patronage if people put up with a far slower service via Central.  372, 393, 395, 376 (and part of 339/374) have far lower combined peak direction patronage than the 891/895 services, and the listed services do also have reverse peak patronage too.

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« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2012, 11:03:04 AM »
^ Maybe they will just have to, for the sake of system capacity. 

Let's face it, how many of them are going to drive if it happens to take slightly longer to get there by tram? 

For that matter, why is it so important to have an express from Circular Quay?  Catch the train to Central and get on the tram there.
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« Reply #26 on: December 23, 2012, 11:41:03 AM »
On the X94, Kingsford to Martin Place is:
19 mins in, 21 minutes out

@Bathurst St
23-24 mins in, 18 minutes out

I expect with the stage 1 plan the Xnn buses will keep running.  If they keep running with the stage 2 plan, then what is the point of stage 2?

Let's say that they remove the X buses, that will mean 10-20 minutes slower in each direction.  I expect that will be enough to get a number driving again.  The interchange at Kingsford for many isn't pretty either.  They may extend the LR to the end of Anzac Pde, but even then it doesn't cover the 392/396/397/399 corridors.

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« Reply #27 on: December 27, 2012, 10:54:52 AM »
To qualify my comments, the graphic shows that the Xnn buses are planned to keep running after the stage 2 network is implemented.

That really raises the question as to who would actually want to use the tram from the east to George St?

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« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2012, 01:07:48 PM »
To qualify my comments, the graphic shows that the Xnn buses are planned to keep running after the stage 2 network is implemented.

That really raises the question as to who would actually want to use the tram from the east to George St?

They are doing similar here in Dubai with new 800m elevated walkway to Dubal Mall from Metro station open this month, the bus won't be cancelled and there are other stops. Like Sydney I suspect the service will be reviewed and modified/cancelled as required after a review a few months later.
The graphic does show that they plan to change Circular Quay via Central to Anzac Pde routes (339/374/376/391).  Not exactly sure what they would do with them, but 339 users recently stopped a change to that route apparently.  If they don't bring in integrated fares, I expect a lot of grumpiness.

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« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2013, 11:26:26 PM »
Gladys on 2UE talking about Light Rail: http://media.mytalk.com.au/2ue/audio/100113transport.mp3
From: http://www.2ue.com.au/blogs/2ue-blog/george-street-light-rail-disruption/20130110-2chmr.html

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« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2013, 09:03:10 AM »
Quote
Clover Moore digs in for a rail tunnel fight

    Vikki Campion
    The Daily Telegraph
    February 06, 2013 12:00AM

Having her say ... Lord Mayor Clover Moore. Source: The Daily Telegraph

THE Surry Hills light rail link should go underground to stop residents losing their homes and to protect the area's character, Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore says.

Ms Moore has called for the trams to be put in a tunnel, from Central Station to Moore Park underneath Devonshire St, as part of Sydney's $1.6 billion light rail network proposal.

Residents are rallying for a tunnel, claiming the rail line would "destroy the heartland of Surry Hills", or urging planners to change the route to revive ailing Oxford St. Ms Moore said she had contacted state and federal ministers urging them to fund a tunnel from Central to the SCG.

"While action to improve transport is welcome, there are real concerns that people's homes and Moore Park will be impacted if the light rail line is built at street level," she said.

"A tunnel will be faster, cheaper over the life of the system, and will provide a far better service for events at Moore Park."

Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian said a tunnel would cost millions of dollars more to fund, as well as removing a stop in Surry Hills.

Ms Berejiklian said light rail was an important part of a strategy to ease CBD congestion and more design work was needed before she could confirm the exact route through Surry Hills.

A full planning assessment and community consultation would also be done, she said.

Ms Berejiklian said the new route would have light rail travel above ground, including a stop so customers could visit restaurants, bars and businesses - and so Surry Hills residents could use the trams.

People Unite Surry Hills founder Venietta Slama-Powell said running light rail up Oxford St would "rejuvenate" the struggling strip but "destroy the heartland of Surry Hills".

Ms Slama-Powell said residents had been in tears over the future of their homes, which could be knocked down for the project.

Translation: after years of lobbying for Light Rail, she now doesn't think it should go past anyone's house.

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« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2013, 09:35:45 AM »
Sounds like Clover is having a bet each way.

Wasn't she the most persistent and noisiest agitator for this line in the first place?

As the Gold Coast shows, introducing light rail when people don't know or have forgotten what it is can be a very painful experience. This has occurred many times in the USA as well, with some very noisy anti-LRT protests which seem to persist right up to the day the first tram runs.

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« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2013, 11:23:10 AM »
Sounds like Clover is having a bet each way.

Wasn't she the most persistent and noisiest agitator for this line in the first place?
Correct.

And sending it up Oxford St as she is suggesting goes against some of the most pressing reasons to actually build the line - connecting Central to UNSW/Moore Park.

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« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2013, 04:46:11 PM »
It's staggeringly self-contradicting.  If it's good enough to have trams out the front of the QVB, it's fine to run them through Surry Hills.
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« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2013, 07:51:15 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Berejiklian wants more help to fund light rail
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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« Reply #35 on: March 18, 2013, 10:34:34 AM »
The Telegraph --> Lord Mayor Clover Moore calls on Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian to build lght rail system under Surry Hills
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2013, 01:48:24 PM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Sydney drivers facing years of George Street roadworks
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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« Reply #37 on: April 17, 2013, 09:08:03 AM »
Twitter

Alan Davies ‏@MelbUrbanist 4m

Should light rail go underground or take it to the street? http://wp.me/pPJet-3DX
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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« Reply #38 on: April 21, 2013, 04:08:33 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> The tram that's dividing Sydney 
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« Reply #39 on: April 21, 2013, 04:09:53 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Light rail plan sits on the right track for this family
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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“You can't understand a city without using its public transportation system.” -- Erol Ozan