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Coal trains in the suburbs (plus other transport issues)

Started by ozbob, August 20, 2012, 09:51:39 AM

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ozbob

Bring it on!   :P  Be some good pics at Goodna ....



Do you really think these can run through the suburban network?
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ozbob

There is an article in the CM today, "No end in sight for coal line dust-up"  page 17,  by Tuck Thompson and Robyn Ironside.  Not online, will scan later today (baby sitting today :-) )

It is a good overview of the situation with the alternatives to running through the subs.

2031 is mentioned ... LOL
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ozbob

From the Couriermail 16th November 2012 page 17

No end in sight for coal line dust-up

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ozbob

Plans to double the amount of coal exported from Brisbane.  This means around 180 coal trains a week?  This will exclude any further frequency increases for suburban trains on the Ipswich line.  There would probably start to be significant public concerns with dust issues, noise and even level crossings.  If the coal doesn't go by rail would be forced onto the roads, again not really a sustainable option either.  Southern freight corridor is just a '2031' notion.  Wandoan is probably a little firmer but that is not going to alter Port of Brisbane's plans.

Houston?

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#Metro

QuotePlans to double the amount of coal exported from Brisbane.  This means around 180 coal trains a week?  This will exclude any further frequency increases for suburban trains on the Ipswich line.

Surely prospective passengers can just ride in the coal bins?(joke) The trains might be more frequent! 180 trains divided by 7 days and a 15 hour span is about 2 trains per hour, supplement the existing ones...
I'm not a TMR. Negative people... have a problem for every solution. Posts are commentary and are not necessarily endorsed by RAIL Back on Track or its members.

ozbob

Don't forget the empties have to go back as well.  I am not sure if the Toowoomba range line can handle the frequency required.  Not that many train paths left now as I understand it.

I conclude it is simply not going to happen as planned, that is just ramp up the existing system.
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ozbob

People obviously know what is going on generally RTT.  Plans to double coal exports through the Port of Brisbane will be thawted unless they can come up with some better rail options.  Increasing train length is not without issues, but keeping to the present configuration will not meet the demand either.  I think they have to bite the bullet.  The public backlash to more coal through the 'burbs needs to factored in as well, and I think will be significant.  Long trains can be run via Wandoan without real issues once the track is built for the link and the Wandoan line itself upgraded.  Get the coal trains out of the suburban network is the sensible thing to do.

A stalemate.  Government doesn't really want to spend money on the line to Toowoomba,  missing link is still missing in action, Southern Freight Corridor is a 2031 notion, and the inland freight line adds to the general uncertainty.  What will happen? Nothing much of substance, they will just continue to add to the existing coal trains until saturation is reached, and it is close to that now. 
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HappyTrainGuy

They still operate in a tidal way due to the suburban lockout of freights and crossings with the range/NCL.

ozbob

From the Couriermail mail 17th November 2012 page 17

Wagons making wheeze worsen

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mufreight

The rail bottleneck for the movement of coal is not through the metropolotan area but the single line sections through the Little Liverpool Range, and the Toowoomba Range between Gelidon and Gowrie Junction and west of Gowrie Junction to the mine load outs.
The capacity of the existing line can be increased by about 2/3 with the adoption of the fleeting of trains which is similar to a tidel flow concept but has three or four trains operate in one direction on about five minute headings in one direction then a fleet of the same number of trains in the opposite direction through the single line sections.
The restrictions on line capacity are then moved from the actual rail line to the loading and unloading facilities.
All of the complaints about coal dust have some foundation but it is doubtfull that it is to the extent portrayed and a realistic examination will most probably show that the greatest amount of the alleged coal dust will be found to be automotive exhaust emissions and road grime created by road traffic.
There would be dust created by the passage of trains but within a very short part of the journey from the mine loading point the passage of the train would have removed the light particles of the coal (dust) leaving the heavier particles (lumps) on the top of the load effectively closing off the wind of the trains passage to the dust particles and sealing off the load.
Any inspection of the stations along the route of the coal train operations reveals very little coal dust in the areas which if the complaints and argument about the quantities of coal dust created by the operation of these coal trains had any validity should be black with coal dust.
I could be seen that the complaints about coal dust residue throughout the metropolotan area are more a pfurphy by green and anti mining groups to support their aims of a cesation of coal mining and export.   :lo



colinw

Just the Courier Mail & friends trying to create the usual "plastic outrage".  Why bother reporting news when you can just create it yourself (wasn't there a Bond movie about this a few years ago?)

Let the coalies roll - the bigger the better!

ozbob

This morning on 612 ABC Radio Premier Newman was interviewed by Steve Austin. There was a talk back caller who raised the issue of noise with the coal trains.  Think it might have been a Darra caller, however what was interesting was that the Premier actually spoke at length on the coal dust issue and suggested that something will have to be done eg. veneering, as tonnage is ramped up. He also said, that we need to get trucks off the roads and make better use of rail.  He also mentioned the possibility of a new rail line into the port.

Interview --> here!
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colinw

Quote from: ozbob on November 20, 2012, 10:37:23 AMHe also said, that we need to get trucks off the roads and make better use of rail.

So we can expect some concrete action from his Government on the ongoing issues with the North Coast Line and Toowoomba Range crossing?

Yeah, thought so.

somebody

The new Twba range crossing on rail is hard to make a business case stick for.  It's the NCL which adds the value.

ozbob

Blog comment:

Good to hear the Premier on your show Steve. What certainly got my interest was the call and the Premiers response re coal trains. Coal dust has not been a major issue until the frequency of the trains has increased. I have lived along the Ipswich line for near on 30 years. There are around 17 coal trains daily along the Ipswich line now, and there are plans to increase that further. Veneering or spraying a solution as mentioned by the Premier would certainly help. Noise can be abated to some degree but not entirely.

The real issue is running high frequency freight services (coal) through the suburbs. There has been talk of a southern rail corridor, basically Rosewood to Bromelton, up the standard gauge rail corridor and a new line direct to the port. This would remove the trains from the suburban network which ultimately restricts and interferes with the passenger services.

The other option is the so called missing link. Upgrade the Wandoan branch line and new line to connect to the other coal lines into Gladstone. This would take the coal away from Brisbane.

Both these options are long term and expensive. I expect in the short term that there will be attempts to run even more coal trains and possibly of greater length than now. This would exacerbate noise and more locomotives would be needed. So a dust management plan will be needed. It will interfere with efforts to improved passenger train services as well.
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colinw

Quote from: Simon on November 20, 2012, 10:51:25 AM
The new Twba range crossing on rail is hard to make a business case stick for.  It's the NCL which adds the value.

I only partially agree with this.  While it is true that the NCL is in desperate need of an upgrade, the tonnages from the west via Toowoomba are already at or above NCL levels, and congestion has reached the point that grain & other freight is being spilled from rail to road. I think a case can be made to upgrade both, but agree that NCL loop lengths & Nambour duplication are the #1 issue at present.

If coal tonnages continue to increase and the Wandoan - Banana line doesn't come online then the Toowoomba range bottleneck is going to become a severe problem.

somebody

Quote from: colinw on November 20, 2012, 11:29:40 AM
Quote from: Simon on November 20, 2012, 10:51:25 AM
The new Twba range crossing on rail is hard to make a business case stick for.  It's the NCL which adds the value.

I only partially agree with this.  While it is true that the NCL is in desperate need of an upgrade, the tonnages from the west via Toowoomba are already at or above NCL levels, and congestion has reached the point that grain & other freight is being spilled from rail to road. I think a case can be made to upgrade both, but agree that NCL loop lengths & Nambour duplication are the #1 issue at present.

If coal tonnages continue to increase and the Wandoan - Banana line doesn't come online then the Toowoomba range bottleneck is going to become a severe problem.
But you can increase the loop lengths on the current crossing to increase the capacity and improve the economics at the same time.

SurfRail

Quote from: ozbob on November 20, 2012, 10:37:23 AMHe also mentioned the possibility of a new rail line into the port.

Should be more than possible to do this - single track dual gauge unelectrified line from Hillcrest to the Port via the Gateway Motorway and Port of Brisbane alignment with a passing loop or 2 en route.  Follow the motorway up to around Wynnum Road, then strike out due north until you intercept the Cleveland line.  Overpass deposits the line on the northern side, and the existing freight track is duplicated from this point to the junction at Lindum to provide a further passing loop/refuge for the benefit of this line and the current route.

Needs to be combined with the Southern Corridor to really help out.  Even then there is still freight interference onmost lines, but it makes it easier to deal with.
Ride the G:

colinw

Quote from: Simon on November 20, 2012, 11:41:13 AM
But you can increase the loop lengths on the current crossing to increase the capacity and improve the economics at the same time.

If you consider an 1860s range crossing with 1 in 50 gradients, tight curves and tunnels that restrict the loading gauge to be "economic", then yes.

There's only so far this dead horse can be flogged.

somebody

Ok, but I'd be pretty cautious about spending big bucks on a new range crossing when the Wandoan link appears to be happening and also the Kagaru corridor is a possibility too.  I'd need a lot of convincing that we need all three.

EDIT: Actually, perhaps the Kagaru corridor is a red herring.  Did that start at/near Rosewood?

colinw

Yes, I agree with that position.  Toowoomba is definitely a secondary consideration to the NCL upgrades, but the ancient alignment & loading gauge restrictions do remain a major problem - means that locos & coal wagons that are usable on the other coal systems cannot operate the route, and the 2300s aren't getting any younger.

The "Southern Freight Rail Corridor" is Rosewood on the Main Line to Kagaru on the Interstate line. Actually the junction is somewhat west of Rosewood somewhere in the vicinity of the old Lanefield railmotor halt (stations beyond Rosewood were Lanefield, Calvert, Grandchester ... sigh!)

http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Projects/Name/S/Southern-Freight-Rail-Corridor-Study.aspx

Like just about everything proposed in QLD these days, it suffers from 2031itis.

On the NCL between Nambour & Gympie there is still some horrendously bad alignment that needs fixing too.  The poor alignment south of Nambour is at least planned as part of the never-never duplication, but north of Nambour is not even on the planning horizon.

ozbob

From the Couriermail click here!

Coal trains should cover up to prevent dust in suburbs, says Newman

QuoteCoal trains should cover up to prevent dust in suburbs, says Newman

    by: Robyn Ironside
    From: The Courier-Mail
    November 20, 2012 9:41AM

QUEENSLAND Premier Campbell Newman has flagged the possibility that coal trains will eventually have to be covered to minimise dust exposure for those living along the rail line.

Speaking on ABC Radio today, the Premier revealed he had taken note of the concerns raised in in the past week about increasing tonnages through metropolitan urban areas.

"I think it's incumbent upon (the coal mines) to start to move to better forms of practice," said Mr Newman.

"There are chemicals, a type of solution they can spray after the wagon is loaded to try to stop dust.. but I think there's a time in the not too distant future where the community will be right to start to demand the wagons are closed."

He said he would take up the issue with Deputy Premier Jeff Seeney and Environment Minister Andrew Powell about better practice on those coal routes going through the metropolitan areas of Brisbane.

"I think that's something that has to be dealt with. You can't keep expanding tonnages on a line going through metropolitan and urban areas and exposing people to dust," Mr Newman said.

"There is another proposal to change the alignment and change the freight route into the Port of Brisbane, may be that will have benefits as well.

"I understand that's the subject of a private study at the moment with the Port of Brisbane."

The Premier was also asked about the court challenge brought by Together Queensland and the Australian Workers Union which was heard by the Court of Appeal yesterday.

He said he was "sorry" the unions were choosing to fight the government in such a way.

"While we don't want to see anyone lose their jobs, we do have to change the way the public service is structured," Mr Newman said.

"(Together state secretary) Alex Scott has recognised in the past that the headcount had been allowed to get out of control."

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ozbob

Sent to all outlets:

21st November 2012

Coal Dust - real issues

Greetings,

Coal dust from coal trains is subject to  ongoing investigations and management.  For example http://bit.ly/W6jYEk  and  http://www.qrnational.com.au/InfrastructureProjects/Rail%20Network/Coal_Dust_Management_Plan.pdf

Having lived along the Ipswich rail corridor for now on 30 years I have not observed coal dust.  The stations are not covered with coal dust either, however as coal train frequency is increasing there may be a problem.

Coal trains interfere with suburban passenger train operations and limit frequency increases for passenger services.

There are around 17 coal trains daily along the Ipswich line now, and there are plans to increase that further. Veneering or spraying a solution as mentioned by the Premier on radio 612 ABC Brisbane yesterday  would certainly help, but ultimately covers might be the best option. Noise can be abated to some degree but not entirely.

The real issue is running high frequency freight services (coal) through the suburbs.  There was an excellent article in the Courier Mail No end in sight for coal line dust-up  16th November 2012 page 17.  In this article some of the alternative rail route  options were explored. There has been talk of a southern rail corridor, basically Rosewood to the standard gauge railway corridor near Bromelton, up the standard gauge rail corridor and a new line direct to the port. This would remove the trains from the suburban network which ultimately restricts and interferes with the passenger services.

The other option is the so called missing link. Upgrade the Wandoan branch line and new line to connect to the other coal lines into Gladstone. This would take the coal away from Brisbane.

Both these options are long term and expensive. I expect in the short term that there will be attempts to run even more coal trains and possibly of greater length than now. This would exacerbate noise as more locomotives would be needed. So ongoing dust management plans will be needed. Increased coal trains will interfere with efforts to improve passenger train services as well.

To transfer the coal to road would be calamitous of course.

This issue re coal trains just highlights how proper sustainable transport plans have been  failed to be implemented.  The Sunshine Coast Line and the fact that it is single track north of Beerburrum is another classic example of the failure.

Best wishes
Robert

Robert Dow
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mufreight

Coal dust or bull dust.
A train loaded with coal will have all of the loose particles blown off the top of the load within 50 tho 80 kilometers of its journey if dry leaving a layer of larger coal in lumps as the top of the load which effectively seals off the fines in the lower levels of the load.
Most of the alleged coal dust through the suburbs of Brisbane is not coal dust but automotive emission particulates and road grime which contains a percentage of tyre dust which is rubber based and forms a sticky gunk while coal dust tends to remain as a dust which will leave a film if in sufficent quantities but does not form a sticky gunk as some of those who are complaining claim.

ozbob

Corinda has noise issues, particularly at night as trains cross from main down to the Tennyson lines.

Also bridge noise, some work is being done to rectify that.

The main noise issues are to do with the UP sub loop in from Darra West.  Because of the botched layout the loop is the wrong side of the massive earth embankment.  So trains that cross and go up the UP sub (in the down direction ... lol) are very noisy because of the echoing as well as they climb.  Sparks are not an issue.  They may put noise barriers on the UP sub loop, not sure how effective that will be though because of the nature of the loop and embankment.

If they had of put all four lines north of the embankment would have been a lot better for all there, and a lot more trains could have avoided the crossing at Corinda .....  all in all a basket of coal case ... lol
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colinw

The worst wheel squeal problem with freight in Brisbane is the curves through the Morningside area on the Cleveland & Port of Brisbane line. A few years back they had particular problems with wheel squeal from the standard gauge there, although I'm not sure if much goes out to the port on standard gauge at present.  Last time I was in the area, the dual gauge line looked like it was only getting 3'6" traffic - outer rail was quite dull.

ozbob

There is a lot of noise as the coalies come over from the main down which seems to be magnified at night.  Sparks don't do that.

Noise is just one issue.  Bridge noise is not much of an issue other than coalies as well.  They are running a lot more trains overnight and this is what is being noticed.  During the day most people not to bothered.

At my house at Darra, frankly you don't even notice the sparks, just the odd coalie.  But even they fade away after a while.  I reckon most people get used to train noise  and doesn't really bother them.  I spent a few nights there the other week when daughter away and I was surprised at the number of trains running between 1am and 6am though.  A lot ...
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somebody

Quote from: ozbob on November 21, 2012, 17:35:39 PM
There is a lot of noise as the coalies come over from the main down which seems to be magnified at night.  Sparks don't do that.
Is this because the sparks cross at Sherwood, the coalies are heavier or something else?

HappyTrainGuy

Its a mix of things. Different body roll compared to electrics ie stiffness - suspension and dampening. Weight distribution. G Forces ommitted and so on.

ozbob

Yes the sparks just run through Corinda, it is the coal trains that cross from the main down over to the Tennyson line.  Involves a number of crossovers, each one magnifying the noise effects - down main to up main to down sub.  Locals complain about it, so it is an issue. 

Here is a sketch map of the track layout presently at Corinda


Here is a mud map to make some sense of the track layout from Darra to Darra West. Approximate only just to show the general track layout.
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ozbob

The best outcome particularly overnight is to run down coalies on the down sub, they cross at Darra West from the main down, to main up thence to down sub. This makes for a good run through to Corinda and noise is reduced as trains are behind the embankment for the run into Darra.

The empties can go via the down sub as well where no conflicts, otherwise on the up sub, this is not as noisy as down coalies climbing from Darra West on the up sub.
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somebody

Quote from: ozbob on November 21, 2012, 19:50:21 PM
The best outcome particularly overnight is to run down coalies on the down sub, they cross at Darra West from the main down, to main up thence to down sub. This makes for a good run through to Corinda and noise is reduced as trains are behind the embankment for the run into Darra.

The empties can go via the down sub as well where no conflicts, otherwise on the up sub, this is not as noisy as down coalies climbing from Darra West on the up sub.
It would be very unfortunate for the empties not to use the up sub.  You'd think they would have it together by now.

But using the down sub for the loaded trains doesn't prevent the need to use the points at Corinda (although reduces their number) and also adds the need to use points at Darra West.

ozbob

Darra West is not problem where they cross, no houses there, the big advantage of the down sub into Darra is that it is behind the embankment on the run up into Darra and is a lot quieter for the residents (the ones who are rather vocal).  The point noise at Corinda is much reduced as well.
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ozbob

From the Queensland Times click here!

Dust-up over coal trains

QuoteDust-up over coal trains
Kieran Banks22nd Nov 2012 3:00 AM

IPSWICH residents are angry their concerns about about coal dust have been ignored as a wealthy Brisbane suburb has its air tested for pollution levels by the State Government.

More than 100 freight trains haul coal along the Ipswich train line each week, causing many residents to fear they may be breathing in toxic coal dust left behind by rumbling wagons.

The Newman government is awaiting the results of air samples taken near Tennyson station, in Brisbane, but Ipswich CBD resident Cassie McMahon believes the results won't reflect the problem in Ipswich.

Ms McMahon is leading a group of Ipswich residents calling for regular testing along the Ipswich line too.

"I was greatly concerned that it had been 10 years since the government had done any testing," she said.

"They should be happening on a full-time, regular basis because they are travelling through urban areas."

Department of Environment and Heritage Protection executive director Andrew Connor said Tennyson was known as a coal dust "hot spot", receiving the most community complaints.

But Ms McMahon said the enclosed Ipswich train station and Rosewood should be among the places regularly tested.

The group found ledges covered in black dust during a recent visit to Ipswich station.

Ms McMahon's call for testing has been backed by Bundamba MP Jo-Ann Miller and Mayor Paul Pisasale.

Bundamba MP Ms Miller is concerned the testing won't uncover the extent of the issue.

"I think it's important that if we are going to undertake a study to see what the scale of the problem is, then the testing clearly needs to be undertaken properly," she said.

Cr Pisasale said residents living along the Ipswich rail corridor also deserved air monitoring.

"Common sense will tell you covering all wagons is the ultimate and permanent solution to eliminate any potential coal dust issues in urban areas. The health of residents must come first," he said.

Rail Back on Track spokesmen Robert Dow said the covering the coal trains or introducing a rail link to the Port of Brisbane was the best solution.

Ipswich MP Ian Berry said the results of the current testing, due in December, would be used to assess what further action needed to be taken.

"It is important that science inform any proposed action in changing the practices in freighting coal, and that is exactly what the government is doing," he said.

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ozbob

Letter to the Editor Queensland Times 22nd November 2012 page 9

To market: Transporting coal presents dilemma

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ozbob

Quote from: ozbob on November 20, 2012, 10:37:23 AM
This morning on 612 ABC Radio Premier Newman was interviewed by Steve Austin. There was a talk back caller who raised the issue of noise with the coal trains.  Think it might have been a Darra caller, however what was interesting was that the Premier actually spoke at length on the coal dust issue and suggested that something will have to be done eg. veneering, as tonnage is ramped up. He also said, that we need to get trucks off the roads and make better use of rail.  He also mentioned the possibility of a new rail line into the port.

Interview --> here!

Premier's comments re noise/coal dust from 21.40 timing mark on the interview.

".. get trucks off the road, better rail solutions .. "

also mentioned the alternative line to the Port ...
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ozbob

From the Couriermail click here!

Top coal expert has fast fix for rail corridor coal dust problem

Quote
Top coal expert has fast fix for rail corridor coal dust problem

    by: Tuck Thompson
    From: The Courier-Mail
    December 12, 2012 12:00AM

ONE of Queensland's top coal experts says a coal dust mitigation program in the Brisbane urban rail corridor is so straightforward it could be introduced in weeks, not months as outlined in a new plan by Queensland Resources Council.

Ed Crawford, a coal specialist with Anglo Coal, which has been "veneering" coal wagons in Central Queensland for almost five years, said the set-up process does not involve a large capital outlay or significant infrastructure investment.

Residents in the rail corridor have been concerned for years about coal dust emitted from train wagons getting into their homes and the potential associated health risks.

The veneering process, which coats the coal loads in a sticky polymer, reduces dust emissions by 50-90 per cent.

QRC chief executive Michael Roche said New Hope Coal would begin veneering loads of coal travelling by train from its Darling Downs mine through Toowoomba, Ipswich and Brisbane in late March.

Mr Roche said Peabody Energy and Yancoal were "anticipated" to follow suit later in the year despite both telling The Courier-Mail last month they had no plans to veneer coal loads.

Darling Downs coal producers have been accused of dragging their feet for years on implementing industry-best practices, including veneering.

Mr Crawford said there was no reason for the process to be delayed.

"It's a rather simple system," he said.

A $25,000 investment in a storage tank, access to a water source and a mixer for a coal adhesive fluid was all that was necessary.

He estimated the cost of veneering at just 5c a tonne.

Queensland University of Technology air pollution expert Dr Lidia Morawska said the companies moving and stockpiling coal in Brisbane were avoiding industry-best practices because of the lack of standards governing the shipment of coal through urban areas.

"Since there is no standard, they are trying to get away with doing nothing," she said. "But they are starting to feel the community pressure."

Medical experts say coal dust, especially fine particulates, can be hazardous to health.

The State Government has conducted air quality testing at Tennyson to determine if coal particulate levels have been exceeded. The findings are due this month.

QRC said the new coal management plan would also include monitoring at six sites along the rail corridor.

About 9 million tonnes of coal is transported to the Port of Brisbane but it and Queensland Bulk Handling - which leases the port's coal export facility at the port and is owned by New Hope Coal - have long-term plans to double exports to 20 million tonnes a year.

Anglo Coal opted to veneer coal wagons five years ago to ease community concerns.

"It was an issue of sustainability for our business. It was about being proactive and listening to the community," Mr Crawford said.

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ozbob

Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection
The Honourable Andrew Powell

Investigation finds Tennyson dust levels within acceptable limits

An investigation by the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP) into air quality at Tennyson has found dust levels do not exceed national standards.

Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection Andrew Powell said the investigation was conducted over a 30 day period following concerns raised by residents about dust impacts from uncovered coal wagons. 

"The monitoring program at Tennyson was designed to investigate air quality at a complaint hotspot adjacent to the rail line," Mr Powell said.

"Experts from the Department of Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts (DSITIA) conducted air quality testing adjacent to the rail corridor used by trains transporting coal from West Moreton coal mines to the Port of Brisbane".

DSITIA Assistant Director-General Dr Christine Williams said the investigation examined coal train dust impacts in the community from the perspectives of health risk and nuisance, and the contribution of coal particles to overall dust levels.

"The results found fine particles (PM10 - particles less than 10 micrometres in diameter) levels did not exceed the 24 hour average air quality objective on any day at the Tennyson Railway Station monitoring site during the entire investigation" Dr Williams said.

"Findings from the monitoring also indicate that coal trains are not a significant contributor to fine particle PM10 levels in the Tennyson community compared to other local and regional sources of PM10 such as motor vehicle emissions.

"Deposited dust, otherwise known as dustfall, was also tested and found to be less than dust nuisance trigger guidelines.

"The monitoring did find that the proportion of coal dust within the dustfall samples was higher than that found in the previous 1998 study.  However, it determined the major component of deposited dust was from soil and rock particles while coal particles only made up of about 10-20% of deposited dust. Black rubber particles from tyres also contributed about 10%."

Mr Powell said that under the Environmental Protection Act 1994, rail operators were required to take all reasonable and practicable measures to minimise activities that cause environmental harm including nuisance, such as dust. 

"Whilst the report indicates that the dust levels are under the national standards, it is important that the network operators and users implement ongoing network wide monitoring to continuously measure the performance of their dust management systems.

"I welcome the commitment to develop an industry supported dust monitoring system that will commence early next year.

"I am also pleased to see representatives of the coal industry taking steps to address community concerns.  Initiatives such as the New Hope Group veneering coal wagons from the New Acland mine by March 2013 are likely to reduce the amount of coal dust being emitted from the rail line."     

A copy of the Tennyson Dust Monitoring Investigation report can be found at http://www.ehp.qld.gov.au/air/programs/index.html.
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