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Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Project

Started by ozbob, August 15, 2012, 10:08:23 AM

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Fares_Fair

Regards,
Fares_Fair


Fares_Fair

Regards,
Fares_Fair


Fares_Fair

Regards,
Fares_Fair


Fares_Fair

Regards,
Fares_Fair


timh

Quote from: Fares_Fair on September 10, 2019, 22:02:47 PM
https://twitter.com/Jeffrey_Addison/status/1171382301533462528?

Great find here FF. This is the first official document I've seen that outlines a solid corridor and station locations.

I'm interested to note a couple of things though:

- The station at Beerwah East is basically in the middle of nowhere. On current maps I can see hardly any buildings near it at all. I'm assuming there's some sort of development planned here long term?
- I think the spur line to get to Maroochydore is a weird choice but I guess its the only way you can service the new CBD there AND still get across the river to the airport.


Fares_Fair

Hi timh,
Yes, Beerwah East is one of two major population areas mandated for significant growth over the next 10-15 years. The other; Caloundra South.

Your second point, correct 😊
Regards,
Fares_Fair


Stillwater

From the report:

The SBC found that there are four key transport challenges for the Sunshine Coast region:

1. growing levels of road congestion on key arterial roads within the Sunshine Coast region, resulting in increasing costs of congestion, lost productivity and eroded regional amenity;

2. a high level of dependency on private motor vehicle transport, resulting in low levels of public transport mode share, as current public transport options are considered uncompetitive compared to private vehicles;

3. urban expansion increases the need to travel and reduces the effectiveness of public and active transport, and reinforces car dependence; and

4. the continuing need to broaden the economic base to retain high levels of employment self-containment.

Stillwater

#127
Oh no!  Utopia's National Building Authority is against the Sunshine Coast Light Rail!   :-w

https://iview.abc.net.au/show/utopia

verbatim9


ozbob

Sunshine Coast Daily --> Push to secure mass transport solve ramps up

QuoteA PUSH for a mass transit system will be made with renewed vigour in 2020, as a detailed business case is developed in a bid to secure state and federal funding.

A strategic business case already undertaken by Sunshine Coast Council established the economic, environmental and social benefits that could be attained through a mass transit system "supported by urban consolidation".

It was envisaged that a mass transit system, which easily connected people to employments nodes could attract new industries, enhance employment opportunities and stimulate regional prosperity.

In May, the State Government confirmed it would match up to $7.5 million in investment in a detailed business case with council, including costings for light rail, which was currently the council's preferred option.

In July, a submission of the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Strategic Business Case to the State Government was endorsed by the council, marking the completion of the first-stage of the government-established review framework through, which state and federal funding for the project could be accessed.

In a 2013 study, the Sunshine Coast Light Rail Project Route Planning and Impact Assessment Report, it was found there was about 2400ha of "developable land" in the 4900ha study area corridor.

"Significant areas of under developed land exist at Kawana, Bokarina and Maroochydore," the report found.

"These areas are largely already identified for future development.

"Clusters of lower constraint sites are evident along Aerodrome Road, some areas of Brisbane Road and Nicklin Way."

That report found there were opportunities to rethink "traditional approached and reorientate infill onto the cross streets, rather than the main corridor".

It was noted that approach could "avoid the emergence of a single, unbroken 'strip' of infill development along the light rail alignment and at certain locations, support coastal transit villages with a range of shops and community facilities".

Aerodrome Rd in Maroochydore and Nicklin Way were identified as key arterial roads which could be reimagined, driven by a mass transit system, likely light rail, operating on a corridor along those routes.

The 2013 report found that "the passenger capacity of light rail can relieve the pressure of growing congestion and eliminate the need for progressive future road widening".

Multiple route options were identified to service Caloundra, Kawana, Mooloolaba and Maroochydore.

The preferred route serviced Caloundra, large swathes of Nicklin Way, as well as the Kawana Health Precinct, along Brisbane Rd and Walan St at Mooloolaba, before running along Alexandra Pde and Aerodrome Rd into the new Maroochydore CBD.

The recent strategic business case identified the Maroochydore to Kawana stretch as priority area one of a mass transit system.

The second highest priority was the CAMCOS South corridor, which would support a North Coast Line connection and also service future Beerwah East and Caloundra South communities.

Mass transit from Kawana to Caloundra was third-highest priority, while CAMCOS North was priority four and a future airport connection was the region's fifth-highest priority for a mass transit system.

It was understood the current business case process was still exploring multiple options for the system, including light rail as well as a dedicated bus or trambus system.

Timelines on the council's website indicated a possible construction start of 2023.

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Sunshine Coast Daily --> Property guru calls for end to transport games

QuoteONE of the region's leading commercial property experts fears future prosperity will be jeopardised if public transport solutions can't be found.

CBRE Sunshine Coast managing director Rem Rafter said unprecedented growth and an infrastructure pipeline worth billions of dollars was all in jeopardy if dithering over public transport solutions continued.

The 40-year local resident said the current transport infrastructure simply couldn't keep up with the rapid population growth.

His views were noted in CBRE's annual Viewpoint Sunshine Coast report prepared by Mr Rafter and his colleague, Brendan Robins.

Mr Rafter said it was time to stop "playing the blame game" and start to determine how to best fast-track transport infrastructure projects.

"We've been talking about these issues for decades and in the main, getting nowhere," he said.

"We need a transport system that will meet the needs of the community and foster economic profitability and sustainability – and we need it now.

"Our main vehicle roads such as Nicklin Way, Caloundra Rd and around the Maroochydore CBD are groaning in peak times."

Despite the inadequacies in the transport system, Mr Rafter's report still painted a glowing picture of the region's prospects, with population set to swell by almost 100,000 in seven years.

SunCentral Maroochydore project director Mark Salmon said a mass transit system linking major tourism, business and residential nodes was an "important factor' in the success of the new city centre project.

"The Maroochydore city centre project being part of the Sunshine Coast Principal Regional Activity Centre has been planned to provide retail, commercial and residential densities serviced by access to Mass Transit and heavy passenger rail systems," he said.

"Corridors for Mass Transit and for heavy passenger rail have been set aside in the planning for the city centre. Efficient Mass Transit and heavy passenger rail systems can be a catalyst for increased commercial, retail and residential investment in the city centre and across the region.
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> Gridlocked by 2040: Business community outlays fears


PLAN: The proposed routes for light rail and other transport modes.

QuoteA BUSINESS community facing gridlock is pinning its hopes on mass transit, namely light rail, to secure its future.

Maroochydore Chamber of Commerce president Brendan Bathersby said based on current growth trajectories, the region was set to be gridlocked by 2040.

"We see it as absolutely essential for the Coast," he said.

A business case process is currently underway for a mass transit system servicing the spine of the region in a bid to accommodate rapid population growth and drive infill development in key coastal hubs.

The Sunshine Coast Council's preferred option is understood to be a light rail system, although other modes of transport are being explored as part of the business case process.

A southeast Queensland 2032 Olympic bid has gained plenty of momentum in recent weeks, and there is hope it could be the catalyst for significant transport infrastructure investment.

Mr Bathersby said regardless of whether an Olympic bid came to fruition and the region hosted any events or athletes, the mass transit solution was essential to the region's future.

He said the council's proposal was the only case being put forward at present, and on that basis the chamber believed it deserved support.

He said they were in the process of seeking feedback from members about the worst congestion choke points in the Maroochydore area in a bid to provide that feedback to council to help with the business case development.

Mr Bathersby said the planned route, with light rail coming from Kawana up the Nicklin Way, through Mooloolaba, across the top of Alexandra Headland and into Maroochydore, was "just a fantastic prospect".

He said a united approach would be key to securing funding support from other tiers of government, as it had been on the Gold Coast.

He said he understood community members had been writing two-to-three letters a day to the State Government demanding light rail services, while the business community had united and were engaged in the process, pressing for light rail at every opportunity.

"It's absolutely imperative come February-March (that the business community is united behind the push)," he said.

"It's absolutely imperative that from that point on the business community is banging the drum."

He said he understood the expectation was to be turning soil in the project by 2023.

Key to the success of the system is the integration with heavy rail.

Mr Bathersby said ideally the light rail network servicing the coastal spine, entering the new Maroochydore CBD from the east, would be complemented by a heavy rail CAMCOS connection from the west.

He said the combination of the two would enhance the city centre and give the region a grounding.

"You can change a bus route with the flick of a pen," he said.
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> Mayor weighs in on Coast's desperate mass transit needs

QuoteSUNSHINE Coast Mayor Mark Jamieson has weighed in on the need to deliver mass transit on the Sunshine Coast as the population grows from the current 320,000 residents to 518,000 by 2041.

Cr Jamieson said the region needed a "major boost" to its public transport network, and a solution that encouraged people to ditch their cars as the preferred mode of transport.

"Just adding an occasional extra bus service on a network that is already woefully inadequate for the needs of this region, won't achieve our goal and preserve the liveability of our region," he said.

Below is his Cr Jamieson's statement in full:

Our current population of more than 320,000 is projected to grow to 518,000 in 2041 - a little over twenty years from now.

That's an increase of 198,000 people. It is the equivalent of adding the population of Townsville to that of our Sunshine Coast today.

We need to manage and direct that growth in a way that maintains our community's quality of life and protects and preserves our hinterland and natural landscapes.

To achieve that goal, we need a major boost to our public transport network and a solution that encourages people to get out of their cars as their preferred mode of travel around our region.

Just adding an occasional extra bus service on a network that is already woefully inadequate for the needs of this region, won't achieve our goal and preserve the liveability of our region.

At the same time, we need to ensure that the majority of housing and employment opportunities are in the locations served by quality transport services. Locating people close to where they live and work and enabling them to get to work in a manner that does not add more congestion to our road network, is a key plank in securing our lifestyle, preserving our environment and ensuring we have a productive economy.

In short, the Sunshine Coast should grow around its mass transit network, not freeways and motorways.

That's why our council is doing the hard yards to plan and advocate for a major new mass transit system for our Sunshine Coast.

The public transport network on the Sunshine Coast is a state government responsibility. Unfortunately, however, the State has not stepped up to the plate. So, our council has taken up the cudgel to undertake the important planning and assessment studies for an integrated mass transit solution.

Council wants our residents and our region to be better positioned to secure the investment required by the State and Federal governments to deliver a contemporary and integrated public transport system that meets our community's needs now and well into the future.

Our council has been undertaking the necessary planning and consulting our community about this matter since 2012, when we released the "Line in the Sand" report and has continued to promote the need for quality mass transit through subsequent publications such as 2014's "Shaping Our Future" and 2017's "Urban Transformation" directions paper.

However, to have any chance of securing the necessary State and Federal government funding, there must be a thorough and robust supportive business case. Council is now well advanced through the three phase business case development process.

The State and Commonwealth Governments both insist that large projects like this are subject to a multiphase business case - starting with a strategic business case, leading to a preliminary business case and concluding with a detailed business case.

Council completed the strategic business case in July this year and we're now working on the preliminary business case, which will be completed in mid-2020.

In May this year, I secured an agreement with Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk that the Queensland Government will match the council by providing up to $7.5 million for the development of the detailed business case, reflecting the significance of this process for the State. This final piece of the puzzle will be completed by the end of 2021.

All three phases of the business case process need to be completed in order for the project to qualify for funding from the Queensland and Commonwealth governments.

Past studies have suggested light rail is the best mass transit solution for local travel, but this is being looked at again, along with other modes of travel, to determine which system will deliver the necessary standard of service that will meet the needs of our region in the most cost-effective and sustainable manner.

No preferred transport solution has yet been identified, with council looking at options which include:

• Bus rapid transit, running in the middle of the road with high capacity electric buses

• Emerging technologies like autonomous buses and trackless trams

• Dedicated bus lanes to accommodate a new, branded bus service

• An improved version of the existing bus network, with some localised bus priority measures like queue jumps (e.g. "B lamps") at traffic signals.

As for the connection to Beerwah from the coast, Council believes that will be best achieved by an extension of the rail system, seamlessly integrated with the mass transit solution identified for the urban coastal corridor.

State and Federal government backing and funding will be essential for the delivery of a mass transit solution on the Sunshine Coast.

Council cannot - and should not - have to deliver this on its own.

As important as the business case process is, our Council will be working hard to stress how critical it will be for the Sunshine Coast to avoid the worst effects of traffic congestion by delivering mass transit as our population grows. That is responsible planning and a hallmark of our Council.
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> Parking pinch prompts call for mass transit system

QuoteBUSINESS owners say the brunt of the Coast's traffic congestion issues can be felt most during the summer holidays when local customers steer clear for weeks.

The reconfiguration of the Brisbane Road carpark promises more car spaces but the owner of the neighbouring Taps Mooloolaba Steve Barber isn't convinced it will solve the hotspot's problems.

He said the development of a mass transit system up the spine of the region was critical to keeping locals coming back and traffic flowing.

"It's a nightmare for tourists and locals trying to get into Mooloolaba at this time of year," Mr Barber said.

"We watch cars loop around until they give up on finding a carpark and leave.

"When the holidays roll around we have locals say 'we'll see you in a couple weeks' and that does hurt us because we live off our locals."

A business case process is currently under way for a transit system servicing the spine of the region in a bid to accommodate rapid population growth and drive infill development in key coastal hubs.

Sunshine Coast Council's preferred option is understood to be a light rail system, although other modes of transport are being explored.

Maroochydore Chamber of Commerce president Brendan Bathersby agreed with Mr Barber that light rail would prevent the Coast from becoming gridlocked by 2040 as current growth trajectories indicated.

"People are becoming far more conscious of traffic on the Coast and those congestion choke points are growing worse," he said.

"One of the effects the increased numbers has is locals don't tend to venture out as much at this time of year."

Mr Barber said a light rail would give locals and tourists the freedom to travel into the Coast's hot spots with ease at any time of the year.

"It would bring more people into these areas because it would make it more of a casual trip," he said.

"It would be huge for staff as well because travelling to work at Mooloolaba at the moment is a real struggle.

"The only way I'll travel to work is on my scooter."
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> Rail plan revealed: Incentives to deliver boom

QuoteAN INTERIM report has revealed the proposed routes, number of stops and impact on population and jobs created by a new light rail network.

The PwC report said a Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Project would act as a catalyst for a housing and commercial infill development boom along the coastal fringe.

The report into the Preliminary Business Case, due to be finished mid-year, had light rail as the preferred option to service the urban corridor from Maroochydore to Caloundra.

Stage 1 of the project involved a 30-minute, 13km route from the Maroochydore CBD to the Sunshine Coast University Hospital, with 13 stops along Aerodrome Rd, Alexandra Parade to Venning St, Mooloolaba, Mooloolah River, Nicklin Way and the Birtinya Town Centre.

The report flagged a raft of incentives and stimulus measures that would be needed to deliver the development along the transit corridor, with an "Urban Renewal Facilitation Toolkit" being developed.

Without the combined impact of proactive rezoning implementation measures (eg a Priority Development Area or planning scheme amendments) designed to concurrently improve and support existing retail and recreational amenity, deliver market certainty and provide for master planned precinct-based outcomes, the expected benefits from SCMT Stage 1 may be reduced," the report said.

Speed limits would be capped at 80km/h, to match adjacent roads, with eight services an hour planned.

Stage 2 would involve a nine-stop, 9km link to Caloundra, but this was not explored in detail.

The report forecast the impact of the first stage, with about 10,000 new dwellings, 20,000 more people and 6336 new jobs expected to materialise by 2041, although it was projected the project had potential to create up to 29,000 new dwellings and 24,000 new jobs.

Stage 1 was expected to result in 390,500 less vehicle kilometres travelled in the region in 2041.

"This represents a reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled of approximately 2.4 per cent when compared with the Without-project base case," the report said.

The report found light rail required the largest intervention and was highest-cost option, but was also the highest performing transport mode assessed, and provided the greatest certainty for investment.

It was envisaged there would be 31,000 trips a day on the light rail system by 2041, with 85 per cent of all boardings from walk-up trips.

"Infill development is facilitated through investment in mass transit that unlocks increased capacity for housing development and increases market take-up within its walk-up catchment," the report said.

The detailed business case is due late-2021.
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> Will the trains run on time?


LAYOUT: A concept map of the mass transit system.

QuoteTHE region's peak business body has raised concerns over the timing of crucial business cases which will shape the future of Coast transport.

Sunshine Coast Business Council chairwoman Sandy Zubrinich questioned whether the Mass Transit business case could be considered for the first iteration of the SEQ City Deal, given the Mass Transit business case wasn't due for completion until the end of 2021, while the SEQ City Deal had been touted to be completed as early as mid-2020.

She said the State Government's Department of Transport and Main Roads had presented in 2017 and 2018 the status of the Sunshine Coast Regional Transport Strategy and Southern Sunshine Coast Public Transport Strategy.

Stage 2 was meant to be completed by the end of the 2018-19 financial year, but the Department advised it was waiting on two business cases- Mass Transit and North Coast Connect fast rail – before it could proceed with the Southern Sunshine Coast Public Transport Strategy.

Ms Zubrinich said she understood the draft business case for North Coast Connect had been finished recently and was with the National Fast Rail Agency before it went to the government for consideration.

Ms Zubrinich noted the interim findings report of the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Project didn't address connectivity with other networks and major population and employment centres including Nambour, Sippy Downs, Palmview and Caloundra West.

She said the interim report into Mass Transit, which identified light rail as a preferred mode, had inspired questions "around the assessment of land use, social and environmental impacts, benefits and costs" which she had no doubt would be the source of discussion between council government and the community.

"We hope the final report will provide some insight as to how the Mass Transport Project integrates with other networks to service the broader community and employment nodes," Ms Zubrinich said.

She also called on the State Government to increase its contribution to the region's infrastructure solutions, and repeated calls for an integrated regional transport strategy.

"It needs to provide a pathway that not only covers costing options but subsequent government funding splits that can be relied upon and survive changing governments," Ms Zubrinich said.

In September last year the business council engaged Lambert & Rehbein to assess existing funding arrangements for regional transport infrastructure.

The review found of the 26 Priority Transport Projects, three were being delivered, three were in design and 20 had no funding commitments.

The review found a lack of major investment in connecting major roads and highways, and noted State Government funding was "lagging" and the transport system would continue to lag until "headline" projects like mass transit and North Coast Connect were delivered.

A Sunshine Coast Council spokesman said a recent progress report on the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit preliminary business case made clear the process was yet to "fully evaluate and quantify" the costs and benefits of short-listed options.

That was set to occur in the next phase, with the preliminary business case to be considered by council mid-2020.
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> 'WALL OF DEVELOPMENT': Light rail plans revealed

QuoteA wall of high-density development along the coastal fringe could be headed our way, says Councillor Joe Natoli, if council's mass transit plans steam ahead.

The Division 4 representative revealed council's mass transit plan and transformation strategy involved stations spaced 500m to a kilometre apart, with a 400m radius of high-density development around each station of the Maroochydore to Caloundra stretch.

Light rail was understood to be the preferred option, although a business case process was underway exploring a range of options.

Cr Natoli said a recent meeting with council officers and representatives of the Buddina community had shed more light on council's plans, and he felt he had to speak out before he was sworn to secrecy after an official briefing on the project.

He said the Coast faced the prospect of "wall to wall" high-density development along some of the major coastal thoroughfares, including Nicklin Way, Brisbane Rd, Alexandra Pde and Aerodrome Rd, if the current plan was progressed.

Cr Natoli said he didn't believe the community would be supportive of a light rail system if they fully understood the trade-off, and questioned why council wasn't engaging with the public already about its plans.

"The public has a right to be told," Cr Natoli said.

He said he understood council was still at least "12 months away" from going to the community, and he feared by then it would be too late, with planning scheme zoning changes being pushed through as the public still tried to understand the plan.

"Be honest with people. Go out and tell them (what the plan is)," Cr Natoli said.

He said he could "see another Gold Coast", with a wall of development along one of the most picturesque strips of the region.

"I'm of the view the public should be told upfront, there should be no surprises," he said.

"Are you prepared to trade away your lifestyle and become another Gold Coast to get a light rail? I think most people would not be willing to accept it.

"This is an absolute game changer compared to what we've got."

Cr Natoli questioned the need for it yet, given the current bus network was so under-utilised, and implored the State Government to trial free bus services to see whether there was an appetite for public transport.

He also called on council to stand up to the State Government's growth targets for the region, while major infrastructure was lagging.

He said about 63 per cent of the region's 180,000 new residents were expected to be pushed into infill development along the proposed mass transit corridor.

A strategic business case for mass transit was approved by council in 2019, and a preliminary business case was due to be finished by mid-2020.

A final, detailed business case was due to be completed by 2021.

The Daily reported in January an interim report by PwC which stated the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Project would be a catalyst for a housing and commercial infill development boom along the coastal fringe.

Stage 1 of the project involved a 30-minute, 13km route from the Maroochydore CBD to the Sunshine Coast University Hospital, with 13 stops along Aerodrome Rd, Alexandra Parade to Venning St, Mooloolaba, Mooloolah River, Nicklin Way and the Birtinya Town Centre.

Speed limits would be capped at 80km/h, to match adjacent roads, with eight services an hour planned.

Stage 2 would involve a nine-stop, 9km link to Caloundra, but this was not explored in detail.

Stage 1 was expected to result in 390,500 less vehicle kilometres travelled in the region in 2041.

"This represents a reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled of approximately 2.4 per cent when compared with the Without-project base case," the report said.

The Daily has approached Sunshine Coast Council for comment.
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Jonno

Quote from: ozbob on July 08, 2020, 13:46:14 PM
Sunshine Coast Daily --> 'WALL OF DEVELOPMENT': Light rail plans revealed

QuoteA wall of high-density development along the coastal fringe could be headed our way, says Councillor Joe Natoli, if council's mass transit plans steam ahead.

The Division 4 representative revealed council's mass transit plan and transformation strategy involved stations spaced 500m to a kilometre apart, with a 400m radius of high-density development around each station of the Maroochydore to Caloundra stretch.

Light rail was understood to be the preferred option, although a business case process was underway exploring a range of options.

Cr Natoli said a recent meeting with council officers and representatives of the Buddina community had shed more light on council's plans, and he felt he had to speak out before he was sworn to secrecy after an official briefing on the project.

He said the Coast faced the prospect of "wall to wall" high-density development along some of the major coastal thoroughfares, including Nicklin Way, Brisbane Rd, Alexandra Pde and Aerodrome Rd, if the current plan was progressed.

Cr Natoli said he didn't believe the community would be supportive of a light rail system if they fully understood the trade-off, and questioned why council wasn't engaging with the public already about its plans.

"The public has a right to be told," Cr Natoli said.

He said he understood council was still at least "12 months away" from going to the community, and he feared by then it would be too late, with planning scheme zoning changes being pushed through as the public still tried to understand the plan.

"Be honest with people. Go out and tell them (what the plan is)," Cr Natoli said.

He said he could "see another Gold Coast", with a wall of development along one of the most picturesque strips of the region.

"I'm of the view the public should be told upfront, there should be no surprises," he said.

"Are you prepared to trade away your lifestyle and become another Gold Coast to get a light rail? I think most people would not be willing to accept it.

"This is an absolute game changer compared to what we've got."

Cr Natoli questioned the need for it yet, given the current bus network was so under-utilised, and implored the State Government to trial free bus services to see whether there was an appetite for public transport.

He also called on council to stand up to the State Government's growth targets for the region, while major infrastructure was lagging.

He said about 63 per cent of the region's 180,000 new residents were expected to be pushed into infill development along the proposed mass transit corridor.

A strategic business case for mass transit was approved by council in 2019, and a preliminary business case was due to be finished by mid-2020.

A final, detailed business case was due to be completed by 2021.

The Daily reported in January an interim report by PwC which stated the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Project would be a catalyst for a housing and commercial infill development boom along the coastal fringe.

Stage 1 of the project involved a 30-minute, 13km route from the Maroochydore CBD to the Sunshine Coast University Hospital, with 13 stops along Aerodrome Rd, Alexandra Parade to Venning St, Mooloolaba, Mooloolah River, Nicklin Way and the Birtinya Town Centre.

Speed limits would be capped at 80km/h, to match adjacent roads, with eight services an hour planned.

Stage 2 would involve a nine-stop, 9km link to Caloundra, but this was not explored in detail.

Stage 1 was expected to result in 390,500 less vehicle kilometres travelled in the region in 2041.

"This represents a reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled of approximately 2.4 per cent when compared with the Without-project base case," the report said.

The Daily has approached Sunshine Coast Council for comment.

This is good planning!! ...and in no way means it will become the Gold Coast(I assume this is the Surfers to Broadbeach section they don't like) This scaremongering does no one any good

SurfRail

Surfers to Broadbeach isn't even that good an example of density, it's primarily towers with resort type grounds around the base for a massive chunk of it.  It's entirely characteristic of the Gold Coast and frankly the Sunshine Coast too (albeit less tall up there).
Ride the G:

ozbob

Sunshine Coast Daily --> They'll have to give it away': MP fears rail land swap

QuoteKawana MP Jarrod Bleijie says the only way a light rail system can work is if land to develop is gifted to foreign companies to build the network.

The former Attorney-General had backed community efforts to force Sunshine Coast Council into more community consultation, after a resident action group titled Mass Transit Action Group formed in recent weeks.

Mr Bleijie said he'd met with the group and understood it was eager to work with council on community engagement to ensure the right mass transit solution for the region.

Mr Bleijie said he thought the group would put more pressure on council to be more transparent with its plans for the project.

He said he feared the impact of up to 100,000 extra people living in urban infill along the Nicklin Way stretch of the proposed light rail corridor on the major road and surrounding traffic networks.

Mr Bleijie said he was concerned not enough proper consultation had been undertaken, and he was dubious about how the project, which had initially been estimated at about $2 billion, or $90 million a kilometre for the 23km stretch, would be delivered.

"The costs are astronomical," Mr Bleijie said.

"The only way that this project will stack up is if the council gifts land to foreign companies to build this rail."

A Sunshine Coast Council spokesman made clear it would be the State Government taking the lead on any mass transit project.

"Council will not be delivering the mass transit solution," the spokesman said.

"So any questions about acquisition of properties and financing of the mass transit solution are both premature and not matters for council, given it will not be delivering the network."

The spokesman said there remained considerable work to be carried out as part of the finalisation of the preliminary business case and options analysis for a potential mass transit solution.

Kawana MP Jarrod Bleijie says the only way a light rail system can work is if land to develop is gifted to foreign companies to build the network.

The former Attorney-General had backed community efforts to force Sunshine Coast Council into more community consultation, after a resident action group titled Mass Transit Action Group formed in recent weeks.

Mr Bleijie said he'd met with the group and understood it was eager to work with council on community engagement to ensure the right mass transit solution for the region.

Mr Bleijie said he thought the group would put more pressure on council to be more transparent with its plans for the project.

He said he feared the impact of up to 100,000 extra people living in urban infill along the Nicklin Way stretch of the proposed light rail corridor on the major road and surrounding traffic networks.

Mr Bleijie said he was concerned not enough proper consultation had been undertaken, and he was dubious about how the project, which had initially been estimated at about $2 billion, or $90 million a kilometre for the 23km stretch, would be delivered.

Rail plan revealed: Incentives to deliver boom

"The costs are astronomical," Mr Bleijie said.

"The only way that this project will stack up is if the council gifts land to foreign companies to build this rail."

A Sunshine Coast Council spokesman made clear it would be the State Government taking the lead on any mass transit project.

"Council will not be delivering the mass transit solution," the spokesman said.

"So any questions about acquisition of properties and financing of the mass transit solution are both premature and not matters for council, given it will not be delivering the network."

The spokesman said there remained considerable work to be carried out as part of the finalisation of the preliminary business case and options analysis for a potential mass transit solution.

"Subsequent to this, the State Government will lead the development of the detailed business case, during which many of the finer-grained elements of a mass transit system will be evaluated and determined as part of determining whether the solution is both viable and ready for investment by the other tiers of government," the spokesman said.

"That said, any mass transit solution which forms part of the public transport network will need to be delivered by the Queensland Government through its procurement and contracting arrangements - not by council.

"Consistent with all of council's previous statements, council has been doing the planning and business case development work to position the project to be considered for public investment."
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> 'Genuine, upfront': Councillor to disrupt mass transit plan


Sunshine Coast Council has revealed concept designs of transport options for the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Plan.

QuoteA Sunshine Coast councillor will this week call for a "genuine and upfront" approach to the region's mass transit plan, and for it not to progress without further public consultation.

Division 4 Councillor Joe Natoli will put forward a notice of motion at Thursday's meeting that council does not progress the mass transit plan to the State Government without seeking public feedback first.

A draft strategic business case was released last month, detailing options including light rail to increase public transport within the Sunshine Coast.

The first of three phases, if the draft is endorsed the preliminary report would be finalised.

The State Government and the Sunshine Coast Council would then chip in $7.5 million each for a detailed business case to be completed by 2021.

Cr Natoli's motion will call for the council to release a report on the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Preliminary Business Case and Options Analysis for public comment.

The mass transit system forms the base of a plan to accelerate urban consolidation and infill development, particularly between Maroochydore and Caloundra, according to the draft report.

Cr Natoli said after a plan update was provided on July 13, he believed the preliminary report would be presented to council at Thursday's meeting for endorsement.

But it was not on the agenda, and was instead mentioned in the council's quarterly report attachment.

The progress report noted the council would "progress with the Sunshine Coast mass transit project business case and engineering design in partnership with key stakeholders".

"It appears to me that by reading the comments ... that the endorsement of the Business Case and Option Analysis will not occur and it will be progressed directly to state interest check," Cr Natoli said.

He said since mass transit plan discussions started in 2012 there had been one major public consultation process, in October and November 2014.

He said at the time there was no talk about infill development being part of the project.

"The public have never been made aware of the urbanisation strategy attached to the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Study," Cr Natoli said.

"I believe it is incumbent upon us ... to be genuine and upfront with the community about what the Preliminary Business Case and Option Analysis is proposing."

Mayor Mark Jamieson last month warned the region risked "choking on our own success" if a mass transit system wasn't delivered.

Cr Jamieson said further community engagement would be undertaken as part of the development of the detailed business case.

A detailed business case, jointly funded by the State Government and council, was due to commence later this year.

"At the end of the day, public transport is a state government responsibility but council has an important role to play in doing the planning work to encourage the necessary investment by government," Cr Jamieson said.

"If we do not do so, then there is little likelihood that any substantive and efficient public transport solution will be delivered."
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Stillwater

While Mayor Jamieson is correct that public transport is a state government responsibility, approvals for infill development and high rise along the route of the light rail is very much a council responsibility. The people of the Sunshine Coast have been pretty consistent in their opposition to mega high rise along the lines of what is there already on the Gold Coast.

SurfRail

I don't think anybody is suggesting anything remotely like Surfers between Caloundra and Maroochydore. 

The Sunshine Coast is even more car dependent than the Gold Coast given it is geographically larger, with a less centralised population and large agricultural pockets.  Need to nip that in the bud by consolidating people around the main corridors instead of letting the areas immediately west of the coastline end up like Pimpama.
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Jonno

Quote from: Stillwater on August 18, 2020, 16:05:30 PM
While Mayor Jamieson is correct that public transport is a state government responsibility, approvals for infill development and high rise along the route of the light rail is very much a council responsibility. The people of the Sunshine Coast have been pretty consistent in their opposition to mega high rise along the lines of what is there already on the Gold Coast.
...and we wonder why our cities are so car oriented!! Public transport not our responsibility!!! Yes it is just as much as it is State and Federal! This thinking must change!

Stillwater

Governments (particularly state and local) develop their thinking based on who has the biggest bucket of money -- and that's the feds.  The Constitution labours states with responsibility for transport (apart from international trade). Nonetheless, local governments, within their financial capacity, are contributing to local transport solutions -- the GCCC contribution to Gold Coast light rail, for example.  We should see Mr Jamieson's huffing and puffing as a lead-up to the State Government electioneering battle -- the state election on 31 October. He wants to point the bone towards George St/William St in the hope some dollars will be flowing his way.

verbatim9

#146
In Qld--->Do people from Noosa and Gold Coast want to be with the rest of us? Google says no

QuoteBut at Noosa and the Gold Coast, they've done nothing except stay home. Even beach and park visits were down. It's understandable they wouldn't catch public transport there because, well, have you ever heard of someone from Noosa on a bus? With the public?

^^This is true to a degree.

A mass transit LRT and BRT plan may convince people otherwise?

SurfRail

The patronage drops on the Coasts are more likely to be attributable to the fact that a higher proportion of visitors use public transport, and they aren't exactly flocking over the border at the moment.

The Brisbane drop is higher because it was fuelled by the majority of suits (not including me) working from home or being furloughed.
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ozbob

Rail Express --> Sunshine Coast Council pushing for mass transit solution

QuoteThe Sunshine Coast Council has called on the Queensland state government to back its vision for a public transport system.

The council is currently in the process of evaluating options for a mass transit corridor that would form the spine of the region's public transport network.

One option under consideration is the construction of a light rail line from Maroochydore to Caloundra, with stage one connecting Maroochydore to the Sunshine Coast University hospital.

Sunshine Coast Council mayor Mark Jamieson said that the rapidly growing region needed to shift from a transport system focused on private vehicles.

"All that this will do is increase congestion and pollution, create bitumen eye-sores on our landscape and inhibit our current and future residents in being able to reach the places they need to get to or love to visit, like the beach, shopping centres, health facilities or where they work," he said.

"Is this really the future that our residents want to see on our Sunshine Coast? I don't think so."

Planning for a mass transit system has been underway since 2012, with consultants preparing a preliminary business case. A final business case is expected to be completed by 2021 jointly funded with the Queensland state government.

In an interim report, the option for a light rail network was ranked highest, above improvements to the bus network or the creation of a bus rapid transit corridor.

The report found that "only the LRT option [is] considered to have significant benefits". Buses were not found to be able to achieve the urban renewal benefits that the project sought.

The population of the Sunshine Coast is expected to rise to over half a million by 2041. The Queensland government is currently upgrading the heavy rail line from Beerburrum to Nambour and investigations are currently underway for a spur line to Maroochydore.

Queensland Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said in May 2019 that governments would look to an integrated transport solution.

"Now is the time for us to work together to map out what is needed and when, so that these major infrastructure projects have the best chance possible of securing the funding that will be needed to build them."

Jamison said that it was essential the community came together to support the mass transit plan.

"Our council needs to keep working on the development of the business case for a mass transit solution – because if we don't, our Sunshine Coast will get nothing from the other tiers of government and our residents' lifestyles will be forever compromised."
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> ]What they said: Councillors divided over transit plan

QuoteSunshine Coast councillors are on the record with their preferred course of action in shaping the future of public transport in the region.

While they agreed public transport was in desperate need of improvement, how to tackle the issue caused fiery debate at Thursday's ordinary meeting.

A majority of Sunshine Coast councillors voted in favour of having more public consultation on the region's mass transit plan before it was progressed to the State Government for a detailed business case.

The notice of motion to not progress the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit plan without more feedback was initially tabled by Councillor Joe Natoli and later amended by Cr Christian Dickson.

The plan outlines ways to address public transport between Caloundra and Maroochydore, with light rail the preferred option.

But some councillors and a community group, Mass Transit Action Group, have raised concerns about the lack of knowledge about infill development associated with the light rail proposal.

Cr Dickson said residents wanted to be consulted about the options on the table.

A need for a public transport plan was initially touted in 2012 in the council's Line in the Sand report.

Consultation was undertaken in 2014 to help form the strategic business case.

The State Government has promised to chip in $7.5 million towards the $15 million detailed business case, hoped to be finalised next year.

After today's vote, residents will have their say on the current draft plan before it is passed to the government to work on the final business case.

The motion was voted in seven to three with councillors Dickson, Natoli, Ted Hungerford, Jason O'Pray, David Law, Maria Suarez and Winston Johnston in favour.

Councillors Peter Cox, Terry Landsberg and Mayor Mark Jamieson voted against it.

Cr Rick Baberowski did not vote due to ill health.

Cr Suarez said the need for a usable public transport system was not up for debate, but rather the associated infill development being proposed.

"Cr Cox mentioned that it's been highlighted in various documents but really that information should still go hand-in-hand (with the mass transit plan) when we do go out for consultation," Cr Suarez said.

"It'll let the community understand the intent of the mass transit plan and allay some of the fear and misinformation."

Councillors Landsberg, Cox and Jamieson contested recent claims that the light rail would result in high-rise development along the coastal strip.

"Mass transit systems do not require high rises to be effective and efficient," Cr Landsberg said.

"It requires appropriate densities near mass transit stations, whether it's 400m to a kilometre away," Cr Landsberg said.

He said people making those claims hadn't done their homework and delaying the process would lead to higher car usage, more traffic congestion and less productivity.

Cr Jamieson said great work had been done on the plan during the past 10 years.

He hit back at criticism from Kawana MP Jarrod Bleijie, who this week described the plan as the "biggest risk" to the region's lifestyle.

"I've put more thought into what the Sunshine Coast needs in terms of transportation than Mr Bleijie," Cr Jamieson said.

"He doesn't have a plan at all.

"The roads are choked, they're failing now but we have no plan, nothing.

"Why isn't he being held to account for what's he's not doing?"

While further consultation could delay the process by a few months, Cr Johnston said it was worth it.

He said there needed to be more consideration into the feed in transport to the system.

"Before we invest $7.5 million (for the detailed business case) we need to know what we're investing in is what the community will accept," Cr Johnston said.

Cr David Law said the consultation should take into account the region's population growth forecast, which is 518,000 residents by 2041.
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Jonno

Widening freeway to 6 or 8 lanes? "Why hadn't this started already!!!"

verbatim9

#151
They better hurry up an implement a plan, because the longer they wait, the harder it will be, to persuade people to switch from private vehicles to mass transit and active transport.

Stillwater

In the lead-up to the state election, mischief makers are saying that Gold Coast scale high rise will be required along the full length of the proposed light rail route to justify its construction.  People are not so much against lights rail, or the route, but the thought of the high rise that might accompany it. 'We are not the Gold Coast' is how the people of the Sunshine Coast describe their community.

ozbob

Sunshine Coast Daily --> Gold Coast rail report raises concerns about local push

QuoteAn Infrastructure Australia report which found urban congestion could increase on the southern Gold Coast if land use changes for the next stage of light rail took place has raised concerns with some questioning the Sunshine Coast's push for its own system.

The Infrastructure Australia evaluation of the Gold Coast business case for the next stage, published in August last year stated its belief that the forecast benefits from road decongestion and land redevelopment within the corridor were disproportionately high, and it would expect higher public transport benefits for a project of the size and nature of the Gold Coast third stage.

The report also found the project's "strategic merit" was dependent on appropriate land use changes and a mode shift to light rail being achieved.

Infrastructure Australia was also "surprised" to see bus rapid transport had a higher capital cost than a comparable light rail option in the Gold Coast Stage 3A business case.

The advisory body found the level of quantitative analysis for short-listing options on the Gold Coast was "very limited" for a project of its size.

The report stated that would be a contrary outcome to the desired effect of reducing urban congestion, if all proposed land use changes came into effect.

Only a marginal increase in public transport mode share was projected in the Gold Coast Stage 3A business case, from 5.3 per cent, to 5.9 per cent by 2041.

A PwC interim report into a Sunshine Coast mass transit system found stage one of a light rail system from Maroochydore to Kawana would deliver a 2.4 per cent reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled by 2041.

Infrastructure Australia found without a stronger mode shift to public transport, the project may not address underlying congestion issues in the southern Gold Coast corridor.

The advisory body also stated its concerns that the State Government's forecast land use changes, and associated benefits, had been overstated in the business case.

Infrastructure Australia considered the 6.7km Stage 3A of the Gold Coast network, which has been funded by the Federal Government ($269 million), State Government ($351 million) and Gold Coast Council ($92 million), to have benefits "close to its total costs".

"Despite having a comprehensive public transport network, the Gold Coast has high levels of car dependency, with 88 per cent of trips by private vehicle and less than 5 per cent by public transport," the report stated.

"Without action, the proponent has estimated that private car trips could increase significantly by 2041, while the public transport mode share would remain at around 5 per cent."

A Sunshine Coast Council spokesman, responding to questions put by the Daily, said the organisation "remains focused on planning for an effective public transport network for our region".

The spokesman said questions relating to the investigations undertaken for Gold Coast public transport were "best directed to those involved in the project", but did note the state and federal governments had both agreed to contribute funding to Stage 3A on the Gold Coast.

"Light rail isn't the only solution being considered for the Sunshine Coast and that has been made very clear in the stages of work published to date on the Mass Transit business case development project," the spokesman said.

The spokesman said three options for stage one of the mass transit solution currently proposed to be taken forward to full analysis of benefits and costs, as part of the preliminary business case, were:

- An upgrade of bus lanes on the sides of the major roads, with new, specially-branded buses to provide a "Quality Bus Corridor"

- A bus rapid transit system much like light rail but with electric buses up to 25m long

- A light rail system with 45m-long trams running in their own right of way, mostly in the centre of the major roads

"Council is yet to consider the final preliminary business case findings," the spokesman said.

The spokesman said the success of any mass transit system relied on people "shifting their reliance on private vehicles" and council planning would look at "all measures to facilitate that behaviour change".

"If we want our Sunshine Coast to continue to be an attractive, liveable location as it inevitably grows to more than 518,000 people in the next 20 years, then an efficient and accessible public transport network is critical," the spokesman said.

The spokesman said council's plan, which reflected the intent of successive planning schemes and regional plans over the past two decades, was to contain expansion to approved areas - Maroochydore, Birtinya, Caloundra and the new communities at Caloundra South and Palmview - and to build a second connecting transport network.

"This plan contains urban sprawl," the spokesman said.

"The decision on the viability of the project will be a matter for the Queensland Government, which is the authority responsible for public transport."

Retired engineer John Malloy, a former business case expert for major coal and energy projects worth north of $500 million each, said he feared Sunshine Coast Council was going about the process the wrong way.

He said he was concerned the process wasn't focused on first improving the existing bus services, and lobbying State Government to do that, then creating a critical mass of users on a "flexible and efficient" bus service, which could then create demand for a fixed-line transport system like light rail.

"Then you densify (after the fixed line is in place)," Mr Malloy said.

"We're doing it in the opposite direction (by seeking light rail approval, then approving densities along the corridor before the light rail network is in place)."

He said his analysis of light rail systems in major cities across five continents, spanning cities in Africa, South America and the US, had found all had started with improved public transport systems, built a large user base on buses, and then shifted to a fixed-line service.

"This isn't rocket science," he said.

"I think there is an element of ego to this."

He said he was also concerned by what he said appeared to be a reluctance to release a post-project review of earlier stages of the Gold Coast light rail system.

Coast councillors last week voted not to progress the Preliminary Draft Business Case to the State Government until further community consultation was carried out.

A special meeting was also scheduled for this Thursday for council to outline its next steps for the mass transit plan.

Questions the Daily put to Sunshine Coast Council:

Q: Is council aware of the Infrastructure Australia (IA) report into Gold Coast Light Rail Stage 3A?

Q: Is council concerned about any of the findings in that report?

Q: The State Government business case found only about a quarter of the first round transport benefits of the project were attributed to public transport users, with the remaining benefits resulting from road decongestion and land redevelopment within the corridor. IA believes these benefits are disproportionately high and would expect public transport benefits to be higher for a project of this size and nature. Does this cause any concern for Sunshine Coast Council, in relation to expected benefits from a Sunshine Coast light rail system?

Q: The report found the project's "strategic merit" will be dependent on the appropriate land use changes being realised and mode shift to light rail being achieved. Is this the same case with the Sunshine Coast? Ie, a light rail system will not stack up without increased population through infill development/redevelopment in the corridor?

Q: Can urban renewal be achieved on the Sunshine Coast through infill development in the enterprise corridor, without light rail? Why wouldn't a rapid bus or alternate transport mode work?

Q: IA was surprised to see in the Gold Coast Stage 3A business case that bus rapid transport had a higher capital cost than a comparable light rail option. Does council expect similar findings for the Sunshine Coast, and has there been indications in the work done to-date, that that will be the case? If so, how is that possible?

Q: IA also found the level of quantitative analysis for short-listing options for Gold Coast Stage 3A was "very limited" for a project of its size. What quantitative analysis is/will council be doing, and on what options?

Q: IA also found that if all proposed land use changes proposed in the business case took place, urban congestion in the southern Gold Coast would increase once the project is completed, a contrary outcome to the desired effect of reducing urban congestion. Why would a Sunshine Coast light rail system be any different? Won't the effect of the infill development required increase overall congestion, even with the expected uptake of a light rail/mass transit system?

Q: What alternatives is council considering? Is there any prospect of future infill development and urban transformation along the railway towns instead? Would the CAMCOS corridor not serve the identified hubs of the hospital and Maroochydore CBD effectively enough, to avoid major infill and increased density along the coastal spine, and alleviate the need for a multi-billion dollar mass transit system? What efforts, if any, are going into those initiatives?

Q: The Gold Coast Stage 3A business case only projected a marginal increase in public transport mode share, from 5.3% without it, to 5.9% with it by 2041, and without a stronger mode shift to public transport the project might not address underlying congestion issues in the southern Gold Coast corridor. The PwC interim report into a Sunshine Coast mass transit system found Stage 1 of a light rail would deliver only a 2.4% reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled by 2041. Does council consider this enough of a benefit to justify the project?

Q: IA also stated its concern that the State Government's forecast land use changes, and the benefits from them, were overstated. Is council concerned the benefits of land use changes for the Sunshine Coast Project may also be overstated? What guarantee is there that they aren't, and won't be as the business case process progresses?

Q: IA considers Gold Coast Stage 3A to have total benefits "close to its total costs". Is this what council is aiming for on the Sunshine Coast? What guarantee is there that this network's benefits would significantly outweigh the costs, to ensure it's value to the community?
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SurfRail

I see that every city has its retinue of retired engineers who have absolutely no experience in transport systems and how that relates to land use, but feel free to hold forth on the subject anyway.

I wonder if Bill Hauff is still alive or if he got struck by a tram.
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Jonno

This is the same group that barely raises an eyebrow over widening freeways to 4-5 lanes...each way!!! Their mode bias is showing!!!

ozbob

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Sunshine Coast Daily --> Release of comprehensive mass transit report delayed

QuoteThe release of the latest report on the Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Plan has been delayed until later this year.

The draft Preliminary Business Case and Options Analysis is expected to be "hundreds of pages" long and outline options and challenges of creating a new public transport network for the Sunshine Coast.

Its release has been delayed after Sunshine Coast councillors last week voted in favour of more community consultation on the plan before it was passed to the State Government.

Project manager Ken Deutscher said the technical report should be released with accompanying information when council was ready to undertake community consultation.

Several proposals are being considered to address public transport issues including a quality bus corridor, bus rapid transit system and light rail.

The preferred option is a 23km light rail line with 16 stations from Maroochydore to Caloundra.

The latest report, now called Options Analysis, assesses land use, transport and liveability and other challenges, however does not address the alignment of the mass transit system or property requirements.

Mr Deutscher said expert advice on timing for consultation recommended the council delay the release of the report until later this year, before starting the six-week community consultation in February next year.

It said that would allow for time to plan a quality engagement program, avoid school holiday and election periods and other council consultation processes.

Mr Deutscher said it was important to "hold conversations, not broadcasts".

The feedback will be used to form a new draft Preliminary Business Case and Options Analysis to give to the government for its development of a detailed business case.

Cr Peter Cox agreed the report should be released with additional information to help residents comprehend it.

He asked Mr Deutscher if releasing the report earlier would undermine the consultation process.

"It has the potential, because it is a technical document," Mr Deutscher responded.

"I'd say it's better to hold it, develop the material to go with it and go out in an organised way because there's no rush on this so let's do it well and do it properly."

If light rail goes ahead, the estimated opening date for the first stage from Maroochydore to Kawana has been delayed from 2025 to 2027.

He said the additional public feedback was not a problem for the mass transit project team, and that they were "looking forward to it".

Mr Deutscher said consultation was not initially included before passing the preliminary business case to the State Government because the end project would not be delivered by the council.

"Many of the decisions we're not going to be in control of because 70 per cent of these roads are state controlled.

"We can advocate but we can't plan.

"We do have control over land use planning and the urban realm and the look and feel of the project.

"We understand the community is quite rightly saying we want to see some of these things now."
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Sunshine Coast Daily --> 'Not like Gold Coast': Transit boss reveals new figures

QuoteThe project manager behind the region's mass transit plans has rejected claims it would result in Gold Coast-style development along the Sunshine Coast's coastal strip.

Ken Deutscher, who has been involved in the mass transit plan since 2011, on Thursday presented a project update, including time frames for additional community consultation.

The Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Plan Options Analysis discussed several options to address public transport issues.

The preferred option is a 23km light rail line from Maroochydore to Caloundra with 16 stations.

Consultation is expected to begin early next year on the options analysis report, before a final report is passed to the State Government for a detailed business case.

One of the slides presented to councillors was titled "not like the Gold Coast".

It compared the estimated average dwellings per hectare if light rail was to go ahead between the first leg of Maroochydore and Kawana with the Gold Coast.

Mr Deutscher said the light rail option could result in an additional 27,011 dwellings between Maroochydore and Kawana, equal to 22 dwellings per hectare.

He said that was 9575 more dwellings than what was expected to be in the area in 2041 without light rail or a mass transit plan.

He said the Gold Coast's Surfers Paradise and Main Beach had an average of 350 dwellings per hectare.

"(22 properties) can fit by putting in significant new buildings in current centres, and the periphery of those centres such as areas like Cotton Tree which are in that catchment," Mr Deutscher said.

He said it could result in redevelopment along Nicklin Way, but that it would be driven by private developers rather than land being acquired by the State Government.

"The stations will attract people and if you've got a big box white goods warehouse there, you'll have people just walking past it, because you can't load a fridge onto a mass transit vehicle," Mr Deutscher said.

"If it's a big block, the message will get through to the owner that they could do something better with that block ... it's that sort of opportunistic urban transformation that would occur."

Mr Deutscher, who was involved in the 2012 Line in the Sand report on the need to improve public transport on the Sunshine Coast, said that at the time he wondered if the community would be supportive of it.

"There was a task force formed which included business and community groups and it was really encouraging because they showed they knew the issues associated with growth management," he said.

"One said to me 'if you've been here five years you think it pretty much stays the same but once you've been here a while you realise the rapid speed of change'."

The State Government's Shaping SEQ plan estimates the Sunshine Coast's population will increase by about 200,000 by 2041.

Division 1 councillor Rick Baberowski, who has held the transport portfolio for eight years, said the council did not have "a secret plan for massive high-rise development".

"I like many others went into politics to protect the Sunshine Coast's character," he said.

"I owe nothing to developers and if there was a secret plan to turn the Coast into the Gold Coast I would fight it."

He rejected claims that it would result in an additional 80,000 dwellings between Maroochydore and Kawana.

"Some critics, including Cr Joe Natoli, have been using theoretical maximum capacity numbers instead of actual projections with population," Cr Baberowski said.

"This greatly exaggerates how much growth mass transit would lead to around the stations.

"These numbers are technical calculations of how many people could theoretically fit in an area if it was developed to maximum capacity with no consideration on real life constraints.

"Maximums don't happen and if they did, the Sunshine Coast would already have roughly double its current population.

"In reality the projection for the area is not 80,000, but more like 20,000."

Cr Natoli was sceptical of the figures and said he still believed it was possible the project could result in the additional 80,000 dwellings.

"I'm not misleading anyone, but the question is, if we are going to meet those targets (of 200,000 population growth by 2041), where are we going to put these people?" he said.

"If we're not going to put them in this corridor, where do they go?"

He said the project could result in "wall to wall development" and that during community consultation the council must not downplay the impact light rail could have.
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