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Author Topic: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.  (Read 24999 times)

Offline ozbob

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« Reply #40 on: January 30, 2013, 12:05:28 PM »
Twitter

Julia Gillard ‏@JuliaGillard

"Today I announce that the 2013 federal election will be held on Saturday the 14th of September." - PM

============

Twitter

4m Mark Scott Mark Scott ‏@abcmarkscott

Prime Minister names the election date: Sat 14 September

============

Interesting move ... 
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline Stillwater

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Re: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #41 on: January 30, 2013, 04:09:00 PM »

Don't believe a politicians when he/she says that the only poll that counts is the one on polling day.  Each if us may have only one vote, but we have numerous opportunities to steer the course of the election by playing a game with pollsters.

Over the next nine months, pollsters from both major political parties will be contacting you and others and asking the basic question: 'If an election were held next weekend, which party will you vote for?'

The answer to that question is far more powerful than the vote you lodge on election day.

Right now, strategists for both major parties are looking to where to allocate resources, and the sad truth is those resources will go to marginal electorates.  So the secret to manipulating the best possible outcome for your electorate is to lie to the pollster, but vote according to your own beliefs and feelings on polling day.

I am not advocating that you change your vote other than the way you want to vote, just that you confuse the pollsters at their own game.

If you live in an electorate where a party of either persuasion holds a healthy majority, the party strategists will wipe it off from the outset.  Why put limited resources into electorate where the party is unlikely to change the encumbent member, or a new candidate from the party that holds that seat already.  If your electorate consistently votes LNP, as is the case on the Sunshine Coast for example, your electorate is unlikely to receive a visit from Tony Abbott; or he may come very early in the campaign just to say that he had been there, a fleeting visit.  Likewise, Julia Gillard would prefer to stage multiple visits to marginal seats where the votes can go one way or the other.

The worst thing for electors is to live in a 'safe' seat.  That is not where the election is won.  In marginal seats, on the other hand, the parties have their feelers out, assessing sentiment, discovering the local issues.  So if a seat is marginal and needs a new hospital, or a higher bridge over the creek that always floods, the pollies will promise it.  Bugger the electorate up the road that also needs a bridge, and may have a stronger case for a bridge.

Politics is not about 'serving the people' or some other grand ideal, it is about gaining power, controlling it and exercising it.  Our system of government allows for a limited dictatorship, with the dictator and his/her henchpersons being turfed out every 3 years.  You have a problem on your hands when someone in power cancels the elections and turns the army against the protestors.

However, back to the pollsters and their phone calls.  Just lie.  What's the hurt?

If you are a rusted-on Labor voter in a Labor electorate where Labor has a healthy majority, tell the pollster you are going to vote LNP.  Then vote for Labor on polling day.  Likewise, if a pollster for Labor calls you and you are in a very safe LNP electorate, tell the pollster you are going to vote Labor.  If the polls show a swing is on on in a particular electorate, pollies from both sides will be in like Flynn to promise the new bridge over that flooded creek, or that hospital.

So, the idea is to confuse the pollsters about the voting sentiment, make them think a swing is on in your electorate and it is heading towards being marginal.  Pollies will come running for the photo opportunity - driving the first stake for the hospital, saying that the bricks, surgical wards, doctors and nurses will come after the election, when their party gets into power.  Their only outlay is the cost of a garden stake and sledgehammer from the local hardware store.

Mind you, governments can exact revenge on electorates that don't vote what they perceive is the 'right way' (for them), for instance by cancelling the promised rail expansion 26 days after losing a seat.  Surely governments don't do that, do they?

So, have fun with the pollsters.  Just think that every time you give one of them a false reading for your electorate, you are having a defacto vote, multiple times.  That way you maximise the value of the vote that you cast on polling day -- the vote that really counts, but which has been given greater value through the trick the pollster process.  Happy voting!





Offline ozbob

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« Reply #42 on: January 30, 2013, 04:20:29 PM »
Brisbanetimes --> PM announces election for September 14
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Re: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #43 on: January 31, 2013, 03:15:10 PM »
http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/opinion/political-news/craig-thomson-arrested-by-fraud-squad-20130131-2dmnn.html

Theoretically could affect the above, but I doubt there will be a conviction before August.

Offline ozbob

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« Reply #44 on: February 22, 2013, 06:41:11 PM »
Couriermail --> Galaxy poll finds Kevin Rudd would lead Labor to election victory if he regained ALP leadership
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline Stillwater

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« Reply #45 on: February 22, 2013, 07:07:01 PM »
KRudd leading Labor would make the fight for Fisher very, very interesting.  Maybe we will hit the jackpot and have LNP and Labor in Fisher both promising Beerburrum-Landsborough duplication.

Offline ozbob

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #46 on: February 23, 2013, 02:40:10 AM »
Couriermail --> Galaxy poll result could fuel push for Kevin Rudd comeback as Labor leader
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #47 on: March 02, 2013, 12:10:29 PM »
Brisbanetimes --> Wipeout in the west: voters want Rudd
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #48 on: March 03, 2013, 08:37:15 AM »
Interesting segment on today's Insiders.  Says that 4 of the last 7 elections  the winning side has been this far behind this far out.  Also 1980.

Offline ozbob

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #49 on: March 04, 2013, 06:29:20 PM »
http://anthonyalbanese.com.au/infrastructure-driving-productivity-address-to-the-sydney-institute

Ministerial Speech

Anthony Albanese Minister for Infrastructure and Transport

“Infrastructure: Driving Productivity” – Address to the Sydney Institute

INTRODUCTION

“Productivity isn’t everything, but in the long run it is almost everything.”

So said Paul Krugman in his “The Age of Diminished Expectations”.

It’s no secret that Australia’s overall productivity rate has fallen over the past decade.

There are some who argue that the solution lies totally in industrial relations.

This is ideologically driven.

The fact is that Australia’s labour productivity is in the top dozen of international performers.

As the Australian National University’s Dean Parham pointed out recently, in recent years labour productivity has increased by 3.3 per cent per year.

Whilst this has occurred, capital productivity has actually declined by 4.3 per cent.

So the truth is that addressing productivity requires more than the simplistic slogans of those who would seek to return to WorkChoices under another name.

The Productivity Commission and the Reserve Bank have concluded that much of the decline has been due to specific issues in mining and utilities, with some impact from agriculture.

In mining, because new investment takes years before it leads to output.

In utilities, because increased capital expenditure has occurred often well over levels suggested by demand.

And in agriculture, due to our worst drought in a century.

Many of these factors are working their way through the system.

This is not to argue that productivity will sort itself out.

It is to assert, however, that productivity is a complex issue with many contributing factors and we need a sophisticated approach to address this challenge.

It is also to assert that business, government and the workforce all have a role to play.

Government has a particular role in creating the right environment for firms to operate effectively and efficiently.

Firstly, an environment that facilitates sound decision-making.

Secondly, an environment that assists the building of the capabilities firms need to improve productivity.

On the first, we’ve ensured that our macro-economic policies have maintained a strong and stable economy and maintained growth.

We have also undertaken an ambitious regulatory reform agenda through the Seamless National Economy reforms.

On the second, we have made significant investments in infrastructure, education and skills, as well as science and research.

Tonight I want to highlight the work the Government is undertaking through our infrastructure policy framework and investment to boost productivity.

 

INFRASTRUCTURE AUSTRALIA

Upon coming to office we got the policy framework right.

The establishment of Infrastructure Australia was the first step in delivering major reforms to the way we plan, invest in and build infrastructure.

IA’s priority list now guides government investment.

This is not just an academic exercise.

We have now committed funding to every single, “ready to proceed”, project listed on IA’s first priority list.

IA is also leading important planning work.

It has developed the first ever National Ports Strategy and National Land Freight Strategy.

These Strategies provide blueprints for better long-term planning and future investment.

 

CITIES AND URBAN PLANNING

We have also turned our attention towards planning of our cities.

We have developed Australia’s first ever Nation Urban Policy.

This development is consistent with what is a historical distinction between the major Parties.

From Whitlam’s Department of Urban and Regional Development, to ‘Better Cities’ under Brian Howe, to the current Government’s initiatives, Labor governments believe that our national government must be engaged in cities.

In contrast, the Coalition has seen this as a State and Local Government responsibility.

After all, the Leader of the Coalition has stated:

“Transport infrastructure is a state responsibility.  The Commonwealth Government should no more have to fund … [it] than the State Government should have to buy new tanks for the army.”       

While Australia is famous across the globe for our farms and our mines, it is our cities that are the powerhouses of our economy.

Our cities produce 80 per cent of our national wealth, yet they face unprecedented challenges to ensure they improve their productivity, sustainability and liveability.

When we came to office, Commonwealth involvement in the planning and development of our cities barely rated a mention in the national conversation.

We are turning this around.

The National Urban Policy released in 2011, marked the first time in our history where the national government clearly articulated our aspirations for our cities.

We also committed to measure our progress towards these aspirations in the annual State of Australian Cities reports, the third edition of which I released in December.

These reports measure progress of the National Urban Policy, and show that implementation is well underway.

We have also been working with the States and Territories to improve the quality of urban planning.

Under a COAG agreement all jurisdictions agreed to a review of their capital city strategic planning systems against nine criteria.

These include preserving future transport corridors, a better balance between land-release and urban in-fill, climate change mitigation, better urban design to reduce water and energy usage, and preparedness for the aging of the population.

We are working with the states to drive this agenda through the Standing Council on Transport and Infrastructure, which I chair.

A key focus of this is to develop a set of common indicators so we can measure progress both over time, and draw comparisons between cities.

These will be identified each year in the State of Australian Cities report.

Consistent with the collaborative approach of the Infrastructure Australia model, I have appointed a National Urban Policy Forum, including peak industry organisations, to oversee this process.

For the first time outside expertise is being brought into the policy development process upfront, rather than just commenting on government decisions after they have been made.

With all of these approaches, the productivity agenda is a common theme.

 

INFRASTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORT INVESTMENT

Infrastructure is the critical enabler of productivity.

The imperative for action is clear.

Over the next two decades Australia’s freight task will double.

Public transport usage will increase by one-third.

International passenger movements through our capital city airports will almost triple.

To meet these challenges, this Labor Government has delivered record infrastructure investment and pursued complementary reforms.

We have doubled the roads budget.

Our road investments are constructing more than 7,500 km of new and upgraded lanes.

This is in addition to more than 14,000 local government road projects under the Roads to Recovery program, 2,000 Blackspot projects, and 300 heavy vehicle safety and productivity projects.

We have increased investment in rail tenfold.

We are rebuilding over one-third of the Interstate Rail Freight Network – over 4000 km of new or upgraded track.

We are taking seven hours off the journey from Melbourne to Brisbane.

We are taking nine hours off the journey from the east coast to the west coast.

We have committed more to urban public transport since 2007 than all previous governments combined since Federation.

This investment is already paying dividends.

The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics estimates that for each dollar spent in our $36 billion dollar Nation Building Program, projects will return $2.65 in benefits.

 

RAIL INVESTMENTS

Our investments are targeting projects that deliver the greatest productivity benefits.

For example, investments to separate the freight and passenger tasks on our busy train networks.

I recently opened the one billion dollar Southern Sydney Freight Line.

This has ended the previous curfew which operated during peak morning and afternoon periods for rail freight from Port Botany because the passenger line received priority.

A common-sense reform, but one which took determination to achieve.

Similarly construction has begun on the Northern Sydney Freight Corridor project.

This will separate freight and passenger lines and improve productivity on what has been the single largest bottleneck on the interstate freight network.

These two projects, and the development of the Moorebank Intermodal Terminal, are vital infrastructure projects for Sydney.

Moorebank will remove 3,300 trucks off Sydney’s roads every single day.

It will create 1700 jobs.

It will enable increased modal shift from road to rail, reducing traffic congestion and delivering benefits for the environment and productivity.

Moorebank is also a great example of how the Government can use its land ownership to facilitate and drive private sector investment in infrastructure.

The Moorebank Intermodal terminal will provide the facilities needed for the next five decades, not just the next five years.

 

ROAD INVESTMENTS

We are also investing significant funds in important road projects in Sydney.

Investments that will ease traffic congestion, reduce commute times and increase productivity.

We invested in a widening of the F5 freeway, which I officially opened last year.

This is one of Sydney’s busiest roads which services more than 80,000 vehicles per day.

We have invested $300 million in the upgrade of the Great Western Highway, which is currently underway.

All up, we have invested $3.2 billion in the Sydney basin in these critical transport infrastructure projects.

Today we announced we would make substantial funds available for Western Sydney motorways.

We want to get the planning right.

This is why we allocated $25 million for this in last year’s Budget.

Common sense tells you that we need to get people to the city on the M4, and freight to the port on the M5.

This contrasts with the other side of politics who are prepared to commit to half-baked proposals.

For the whole of NSW, we are investing $11.6 billion – or one in every three dollars of our Nation Building Program – in the State’s road and rail networks.

In coming months, the full duplication of the Hume Highway will be complete.

Almost two centuries after the explorers Hume and Hovell plotted a path from Sydney south to Port Phillip Bay, Australians will finally be able to enjoy a safe and separated 21st century road between our two biggest cities.

On the Pacific Highway, right now there are more than 1300 people at work on the duplication.

This month the Kempsey Bypass will open.

This includes Australia’s longest bridge – some 3.2 km long – over the Macleay River and floodplain.

Work is going gangbusters on the $1.7 billion Hunter Expressway which is on track to be completed this year.

Under the Nation Building Program we are also investing in ‘smart technology’ to upgrade and better utilise our existing infrastructure.

Through the Managed Motorways Program we are tackling congestion by using the latest technology on some of our major motorways such as the M4 in Sydney.

Smart infrastructure includes entry ramp signalling, variable speed limit signs, lane control, CCTVs, and digital message signs which provide live updates on traffic conditions and delays.

These technologies can mean significant travel time savings and greatly reduce the frustration of the daily commute, and boost productivity.

Future construction projects will be required to incorporate smart infrastructure in the design from the outset.

 

REGULATION

Our infrastructure agenda is broader than investment.

We are delivering historic reforms to the maritime, rail and heavy vehicle sectors.

We are replacing 23 regulatory authorities with just one for each sector.

These reforms will increase the efficiency of the freight transport sector, delivering substantial productivity gains and boosting national income by up to $30 billion over the next two decades.

The COAG Infrastructure Working Group that I chair, has also been rolling out reforms to streamline procurement processes.

Reforms to reduce red-tape, deliver greater competition within the construction sector, and promote a seamless national economy.

For example, the National Prequalification System in the construction industry which means a private contractor registered in one State can now have their qualifications automatically recognised nationwide.

National policies and guidelines for PPPs and Alliance Contracting have been developed to standardise project appraisal techniques.

These will drive greater value for money.

Another initiative, led by my Department, was the development of the National Infrastructure Construction Schedule – the NICS.

I am particularly proud of this one-stop‑shop web-site, which details every major economic and social infrastructure project in planning or being delivered by governments around the country.

The NICS provides a deeper pipeline of construction projects.

Right now, the NICS site lists more than 90 projects worth over $60 billion.

The recent Industry and Innovation Statement is a major new initiative aimed at boosting opportunities for local companies and suppliers to win more work on major projects in Australia.

The NICS is already assisting with this in the construction sector by providing greater transparency to suppliers and constructors.

This website has been a huge success with over 1.8 million hits, including much interest from overseas.

Another important initiative of my Department is work on patronage risk and better forecasting practices.

Late last year I launched a report into the phenomenon of over-optimistic bidding on toll road projects, and my Department is now following up with further work.

Addressing this issue is important in order to underpin a strong PPP market.

It is clear that an increased level of private investment in infrastructure will be required if Australia is to meet our infrastructure needs.

Recognising this, I created the Infrastructure Finance Working Group which comprised nine experts from the private and public sectors.

This group investigated ways to improve the capacity of governments to invest in infrastructure projects, and ways of attracting greater private sector investment in infrastructure.

The group’s report delivered thirteen recommendations and presented a range of options for consideration by State and Federal governments.

We have begun to implement measures in response to these.

 

SYDNEY AIRPORT

Before I conclude, I want to make some comments about the Sydney infrastructure issue that has been on the agenda for longer than I have been around.

I talk of course of the need for a second Sydney airport.

I believe we are making progress toward actually getting an outcome that will stick.

We are doing this through an evidence-based approach.

The Joint Study on Aviation Capacity in the Sydney Region, jointly chaired by my Department and the NSW Government, shows that Sydney’s aviation infrastructure will not cope with future demand.

Capacity pressure is already evident at KSA.

Passenger numbers in the Sydney region will double by 2035.

They will quadruple by 2060.

Bearing in mind how long an airport takes to build, it is imperative that we act sooner rather than later.

This will require a few preconditions.

Firstly we need strong political leadership and a bipartisan approach.

This requires a recognition that saying no to a second airport for Sydney is saying no to jobs, no to economic growth, and no to Sydney’s future position as a global city.

The Joint Study shows that unmet demand for aviation in Sydney will cost the national economy $6 billion by 2035 and $34 billion by 2060.

Sydney is the linchpin of our aviation network, as four out of ten flights in Australia pass through Sydney.

When Sydney is disrupted the whole network is disrupted.

That is why this is a national productivity issue.

Sydney is already losing out on economic activity, and growth is slowing compared to its rivals of Melbourne and Brisbane.

While 50 per cent of international flights were to and from Sydney in 2000, this share has dropped to 41 per cent.

In 2011, Melbourne’s international traffic grew at 10 per cent – nearly four times the rate of growth in Sydney.

Sydney is now the worst mainland capital for on-time flights.

The opposition to a second Sydney airport ignores that this is an economic issue.

As Premier O’Farrell said last year:

“The fact is that no other part of Sydney is going to be contaminated by the sort of noise that is connected with an airport.”

He has argued that a second Sydney airport should not be in NSW, but in Canberra.

The Greens political party argue that Kingsford Smith Airport should be closed down, and they oppose Badgerys Creek, Richmond and Wilton.

I presume that under the Green’s proposal people could just parachute into the city of Sydney.

The critics of aviation often raise High Speed Rail in a manner that pretends that this infrastructure project is free from any environmental or disruptive consequences.

As a High Speed Rail train passes, the noise level will reach 100 decibels.

The study I’ve commissioned into High Speed Rail from Melbourne to Brisbane proposes a track that is approximately 1750 km long.

Importantly it includes over 144 km of tunnelling, much of it in Sydney, which is the only way a High Speed Rail line can be built.

It requires a substantial corridor in as straight a line as possible, in order to facilitate the 350 km/hr speeds.

This is not to argue against such a project.

It is simply to assert that modern vibrant cities require infrastructure development, and that infrastructure development by definition will have effects that are not desirable or perfect.

I predict that when I release the High Speed Rail study in coming months, some of the strongest opposition to the reality that such an ambitious proposal represents, will be from those who embrace the abstract idea of High Speed Rail.

But as a concept, not as the reality that has a wide corridor, major tunnelling, significant noise impacts, and that’s before we consider the significant economic costs.

 

WHAT NEXT?

While I’ve covered some of the achievements of this Labor Government to date, I’ve only scratched the surface of our ambitious productivity agenda.

I’ve also made the point that there is much more to be done to arrest the decline in national productivity.

In my portfolio we will continue to pursue reforms across a wide range of areas.

For example, the Infrastructure Working Group will continue to reform procurement processes.

We will also continue to work on problem areas like patronage risk, and implement other measures in line with the Infrastructure Finance Working Group’s report.

Such reforms are not easy, but they are necessary.

We will also continue to tackle the big problems and provide leadership.

Our major infrastructure challenges like Sydney’s second airport will not go away. They will only become more urgent.

More broadly, the Labor Government will continue to implement our wide-ranging reform agenda to support productivity growth.

And we will continue to strengthen this agenda.  It’s not just about the roll out of reforms and programs underway.

As the commodities boom tapers off, the productivity imperative gets bigger and more urgent.

It is no longer somewhat disguised by the high terms-of-trade.

Labor’s approach to productivity rejects a WorkChoices approach.

After all there is no point having a wages race to the bottom, as there is always another country with lower labour costs.

To maintain our high standard of living, but remain competitive and increase productivity will require more innovative work and management practices and other measures to make our economy more efficient.

For our part we will continue to take the high road to productivity.

Through cooperative workplaces, working smarter, improving skills and education, encouraging innovation and adaptability, and providing better infrastructure.

That is Labor’s way.


[ENDS]
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Offline Stillwater

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #50 on: March 04, 2013, 06:56:44 PM »
Interesting comment in Mr Albanese's speech, quoting Mr Abbot, the alternative prime minister: “Transport infrastructure is a state responsibility.  The Commonwealth Government should no more have to fund … [it] than the State Government should have to buy new tanks for the army.”

So, LNP federally has a policy that transport infrastructure is a state responsibility.  I wonder what Newman, Emerson et al think about that as they both call on the federal government to fund what their dear leader and party believes to be a 'state responsibility'?

Offline #Metro

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #51 on: March 05, 2013, 04:32:16 AM »
Quote
Interesting comment in Mr Albanese's speech, quoting Mr Abbot, the alternative prime minister: “Transport infrastructure is a state responsibility.  The Commonwealth Government should no more have to fund … [it] than the State Government should have to buy new tanks for the army.”

This is NOT correct. Section 51 of the Australian constitution gives power of the Commonwealth over rail specifically:
http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/coaca430/s51.html

Quote
Legislative powers of the Parliament [see Notes 10 and 11]
                   The Parliament shall, subject to this Constitution, have power to make laws for the peace, order, and good government of the Commonwealth with respect to:

                (xxxii)  the control of railways with respect to transport for the naval and military purposes of the Commonwealth;

                (xxxiii)  the acquisition, with the consent of a State, of any railways of the State on terms arranged between the Commonwealth and the State;

               (xxxiv)  railway construction and extension in any State with the consent of that State;
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somebody

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #52 on: March 05, 2013, 11:35:07 AM »
Quote
Interesting comment in Mr Albanese's speech, quoting Mr Abbot, the alternative prime minister: “Transport infrastructure is a state responsibility.  The Commonwealth Government should no more have to fund … [it] than the State Government should have to buy new tanks for the army.”

This is NOT correct. Section 51 of the Australian constitution gives power of the Commonwealth over rail specifically:
http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/coaca430/s51.html

Quote
Legislative powers of the Parliament [see Notes 10 and 11]
                   The Parliament shall, subject to this Constitution, have power to make laws for the peace, order, and good government of the Commonwealth with respect to:

                (xxxii)  the control of railways with respect to transport for the naval and military purposes of the Commonwealth;

                (xxxiii)  the acquisition, with the consent of a State, of any railways of the State on terms arranged between the Commonwealth and the State;

               (xxxiv)  railway construction and extension in any State with the consent of that State;
Refer to the bit I've underlined.  Clause xxxiv is a complete waste of time due to that.  The feds can do anything they want with the consent of a state.  I'm not sure why the authors of the constitution couldn't see that either, unless they were just trying to make a "motherhood statement".

Offline Golliwog

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #53 on: March 05, 2013, 11:43:23 AM »
I'd also point out the that's talking about what the Feds have the power to do, where as Mr Abbott's quote is about where the responsibility lies.
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #54 on: March 05, 2013, 11:51:40 AM »
I'd also point out the that's talking about what the Feds have the power to do, where as Mr Abbott's quote is about where the responsibility lies.
Their argument is sleazy at best.  The Feds don't give the states the money to do what they have to do in untied grants so I think the Feds are responsible for the states just on that.

Offline Golliwog

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #55 on: March 05, 2013, 12:00:15 PM »
Oh, I fully agree that the Feds have a responsibility to help out. I was just pointing out that no where did Mr Abbot say it was outside the Feds power to fund PT infrastructure, just that he didn't see it as their responsibility. That said, to quote his views of transport from his book Battlelines:
Quote
“In Australia’s biggest cities, public transport is generally slow, expensive, not especially reliable and still hideous drain on the public purse. Part of the problem is inefficient, overmanned, union-dominated government run train and bus systems. Mostly though, …there just aren’t enough people wanting to go from a particular place to a particular destination at a particular time to justify any vehicle larger than a car, and cars need roads.” P174

“They underestimate the sense of mastery that many people gain from their car. The humblest person is a king in his own car….For people whose lives otherwise run largely at the beck and call of others, that’s no small freedom.” P174.

“For too long, policymakers have ranked motorists just above heavy drinkers or smokers as social pariahs….They’re citizens going to work, doing the shopping, taking the kids to school…” P174
I haven't read his book, but I found these at http://www.tonyabbottexposed.com/2010/07/tony-abbott%E2%80%99s-highlights-from-his-book-%E2%80%98battlelines%E2%80%99/#Transport%20System so not exactly an unbiased source...
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #56 on: March 05, 2013, 12:04:06 PM »
Only Sydney, Brisbane and Hobart have government run bus systems.  MEL+ADL+PER are completely privatised.

Offline SurfRail

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #57 on: March 05, 2013, 12:19:13 PM »
Only Sydney, Brisbane and Hobart have government run bus systems.  MEL+ADL+PER are completely privatised.

Strictly speaking it is:

- Inner Sydney (STA-NSW)
- Brisbane City Council (BT)
- Hobart, Launceston and Burnie (Metro Tas)
- Canberra (ACTION)
- Darwin (Darwinbus) - only a small proportion and the operation is fully integrated for timetabling and other purposes with Buslink who run most of the system.

All of these cities have private operators too (although in the case of Canberra it's only the Deane's buses coming across the border from Queanbeyan).

Perth, Sydney and Brisbane have fully public sector urban and long-distance railways excluding the GSR routes.  Adelaide had a franchisee for the trams and trains but they are now directly administered by the SA government again, and the only long distance trains are run by GSR (The Overland to Melbourne runs with some public funding).  Melbourne and VLine we all know about.
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #58 on: March 05, 2013, 12:53:11 PM »
I didn't think there are any private buses in Tassie except long distance operators?  Obviously, I am counting HBA-LST as long distance even though it is well under 2 hours.

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #59 on: March 05, 2013, 01:23:30 PM »
I didn't think there are any private buses in Tassie except long distance operators?  Obviously, I am counting HBA-LST as long distance even though it is well under 2 hours.

There are a few, not many, and mainly to places a little further afield (eg Hobart to Huon Valley by Tassielink Transit, Hobart to Derwent Valley by O'Driscolls).  Quite a few run with low-floors and are shorter than say the 250.
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #60 on: March 10, 2013, 04:19:39 AM »
Couriermail --> WA election loss adds to Labor woes
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #61 on: March 10, 2013, 04:20:43 AM »
Couriermail --> Labor federal support at 32%: poll
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #62 on: March 10, 2013, 03:36:16 PM »
Couriermail --> Deadline looms for Prime Minister Julia Gillard
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #63 on: March 10, 2013, 07:27:25 PM »
Only Sydney, Brisbane and Hobart have government run bus systems.  MEL+ADL+PER are completely privatised.

You should clarify that "Privatised" does not mean "not govt subsidised"

I caught a private bus from Gosford station for 6 years, I doubt if one trip was actually fully funded by the users on the bus.

I think that was perfectly implicit.
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #64 on: March 12, 2013, 06:26:16 AM »
Couriermail --> Labor bounces back in Newspoll surprise
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #65 on: March 13, 2013, 06:06:56 PM »
Couriermail --> Logan Mayor Pam Parker wants Prime Minister Julia Gillard to visit Logan
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #66 on: March 19, 2013, 03:09:12 AM »
Brisbanetimes --> Ministers desert PM

==============

All over red rover? ....
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #67 on: March 19, 2013, 05:15:20 PM »
Rumour or fact?

=============

Twitter

Tom Steinfort ‏@tomsteinfort

Laurie Oakes reports of moves towards a leadership spill this Friday, with Kevin Rudd backers currently seeing if they've got the numbers
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #68 on: March 19, 2013, 05:33:09 PM »
Bringing Rudd back = Desperation. It may make some Qlder's happy but I doubt it will improve much elsewhere.
Absolutely.

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #69 on: April 04, 2013, 12:08:41 PM »
From Nine NSM click here!

Abbott says no to Vic metro tunnel funds

Quote
A coalition federal government would not invest in urban rail projects such as the proposed Melbourne Metro tunnel, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott says.

Melbourne Metro is a nine-kilometre rail tunnel, which includes five new stations between South Kensington and South Yarra.

The state government has allocated almost $50 million for planning and preparatory work.

Mr Abbott says the commonwealth does not usually invest in metropolitan rail and that situation would continue under a coalition government.

"The commonwealth government has a long history of funding roads and no history of funding urban rail," he told reporters in Frankston on Thursday.

"It's important that we stick to our knitting, and the commonwealth's knitting when it comes to funding infrastructure is roads."

Mr Abbott said he was committed to the East West Link road project being underway within 18 months if he wins power at the September election.

He has promised $1.5 billion in funding for the 18km project, which would connect the Eastern Freeway and the Western Ring Road.
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #70 on: April 04, 2013, 12:13:15 PM »
It's interesting that he's promised to NOT build it before being elected.  Doesn't seem like there was any reason to do that.

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #71 on: April 04, 2013, 12:16:32 PM »
http://www.ara.net.au/UserFiles/file/Media%20Releases/Tony-Abbott-to-grind-Australian-cities-to-a-standstill.pdf

4 April 2013

Tony Abbott to grind Australian cities to a standstill

The Federal Opposition leader has today demonstrated that he simply does not understand public transport.

“Comments today that an incoming Abbott Government would cut all urban rail funding should send shivers down the spine of commuters everywhere” Australasian Railway Association (ARA) CEO Bryan Nye said.

Over the last decade, public transport use has almost doubled in many of our cities, as Australians realise the congestion-busting benefits that rail transport in particular brings.

“We need more investment in rail and other forms of public transport to keep our cities from grinding to a standstill over the next 20 years, not less”, Mr Nye went on to say.

“Clearly not everyone can afford an inner city car parking space, so how does Mr Abbott propose our growing population will get to work each and every day if he refuses to fund public transport?”.

In recent years, all sides of politics have acknowledged that the federal government needs to be a key player in public transport in order to ensure a reasonable economic, social and environmental future for our country. Internationally, progressive and conservative governments from the US to the UK and right across Asia and South America all recognise federal involvement in public transport as a sensible approach.

Mr Abbott’s hands-off approach goes against even his own party. As his predecessor as Leader of the Opposition, Malcolm Turnbull recently commented: “The sheer efficiency of public transport was a great reminder, actually, for all of us as we consider the problems of congestion in our cities—that there is really no way to ease congestion in big cities other than by investing in mass transit”. M Turnbull 20/9/2012

“Leaving public transport solely to the states whilst continuing to fund road projects makes no sense- there is simply no way to coordinate, prioritise and build the public transport our cities need without involvement at a federal level”, Mr Nye continued.

“Investment in public transport has advantages in almost every aspect of our lives. Public transport is healthier for us, it reduces carbon emissions, it is safer and above all it creates communities we would rather live in”, Mr Nye continued.

One single rail line operating at peak efficiency can carry the same number of people as a ten lane freeway, and one bus can take up to 40 cars off the road.

International and Australian research shows that the overall automobile distance driven per capita is starting to level off and even decline, in contrast to a dramatic increase in public transport patronage over the last decade.

Whilst the current Federal Government has invested more in public transport than all previous governments combined, there is still more funding needed to ensure the future economic, social and environmental viability of our cities and regions.
-ENDS-
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Offline petey3801

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #72 on: April 04, 2013, 12:27:58 PM »
Looks like we can say goodbye to CRRLite, let alone CRR Heavy...  :fp:
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #73 on: April 04, 2013, 12:33:15 PM »
Sent to all outlets:

4th April 2013

Position statement: Federal Opposition is wrong on urban rail

RAIL Back On Track strongly supports the Australasian Railway Association in their statement  to the effect that "Tony Abbott to grind Australian cities to a standstill"  (below)

Congestion is chaotic in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane particularly.  The way forward is improved public transport, not more of the failed 1960s roads policies.

At least residents in these cities now know what the Opposition is really thinking.  Thank you, many will now no doubt re-assess their political preference.

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Abbott says no to Vic metro tunnel funds --> http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/2013/04/04/11/51/abbott-says-no-to-vic-metro-tunnel-funds

============================

http://www.ara.net.au/UserFiles/file/Media%20Releases/Tony-Abbott-to-grind-Australian-cities-to-a-standstill.pdf

4 April 2013

Tony Abbott to grind Australian cities to a standstill

The Federal Opposition leader has today demonstrated that he simply does not understand public transport.

“Comments today that an incoming Abbott Government would cut all urban rail funding should send shivers down the spine of commuters everywhere” Australasian Railway Association (ARA) CEO Bryan Nye said.

Over the last decade, public transport use has almost doubled in many of our cities, as Australians realise the congestion-busting benefits that rail transport in particular brings.

“We need more investment in rail and other forms of public transport to keep our cities from grinding to a standstill over the next 20 years, not less”, Mr Nye went on to say.

“Clearly not everyone can afford an inner city car parking space, so how does Mr Abbott propose our growing population will get to work each and every day if he refuses to fund public transport?”.

In recent years, all sides of politics have acknowledged that the federal government needs to be a key player in public transport in order to ensure a reasonable economic, social and environmental future for our country. Internationally, progressive and conservative governments from the US to the UK and right across Asia and South America all recognise federal involvement in public transport as a sensible approach.

Mr Abbott’s hands-off approach goes against even his own party. As his predecessor as Leader of the Opposition, Malcolm Turnbull recently commented: “The sheer efficiency of public transport was a great reminder, actually, for all of us as we consider the problems of congestion in our cities—that there is really no way to ease congestion in big cities other than by investing in mass transit”. M Turnbull 20/9/2012

“Leaving public transport solely to the states whilst continuing to fund road projects makes no sense- there is simply no way to coordinate, prioritise and build the public transport our cities need without involvement at a federal level”, Mr Nye continued.

“Investment in public transport has advantages in almost every aspect of our lives. Public transport is healthier for us, it reduces carbon emissions, it is safer and above all it creates communities we would rather live in”, Mr Nye continued.

One single rail line operating at peak efficiency can carry the same number of people as a ten lane freeway, and one bus can take up to 40 cars off the road.

International and Australian research shows that the overall automobile distance driven per capita is starting to level off and even decline, in contrast to a dramatic increase in public transport patronage over the last decade.

Whilst the current Federal Government has invested more in public transport than all previous governments combined, there is still more funding needed to ensure the future economic, social and environmental viability of our cities and regions.
-ENDS-
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #74 on: April 04, 2013, 12:52:23 PM »
Tony abbott is a rhodes scholar and is not dumb. he's pandering to the clueless middle. These people drive every day and don't understand how PT works. They are the same clueless middle in brisbane that brought down the bus review and even got roped into processing against service improvements to their areas. Politicians are only too happy to pane to this group as these guys are the most valuable to them : the swinging voters.
Negative people... have a problem for every solution.
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #75 on: April 04, 2013, 01:10:52 PM »




 :steam:

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #76 on: April 04, 2013, 01:20:07 PM »
Looks like we can say goodbye to CRRLite, let alone CRR Heavy...  :fp:

You have to wonder what has gone on here.  Feds are presently funding a lot of urban rail projects including electrification Adelaide and track upgrades, Perth sinking rail in the City, MBRL, Gold Coast Rapid Transit, RRL Victoria and so forth.  He has his wires crossed or is it his knitting?
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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #77 on: April 04, 2013, 03:56:20 PM »
Melbourne Age --> Abbott warns Victorian Libs: no money for urban rail

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Offline Fares_Fair

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #78 on: April 04, 2013, 05:57:11 PM »
With reference to today's comments by the Leader of the Opposition, the Hon Tony Abbott MHR.
Infrastructure Australia's primary task is to advise Governments.

About Infrastructure Australia
from their website...
 
Infrastructure Australia is a statutory body, established under the Infrastructure Australia Act 2008 which came into effect on 9 April 2008.

Infrastructure Australia advises governments, investors and infrastructure owners on a wide range of issues. These include:
•Australia's current and future infrastructure needs
•mechanisms for financing infrastructure investments, and
•policy, pricing and regulation and their impacts on investment and on the efficiency of the delivery, operation and use of national infrastructure networks.

Infrastructure Australia's focus is on assisting Australian governments to develop a strategic blueprint for unlocking infrastructure bottlenecks and to modernise the nation's economic infrastructure.

Infrastructure Australia reports regularly to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) through the Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport.


and this ...

June 2012 Report to COAG (Council of Australian Governments) and Assessments.

Media release
13 July 2012
 
Progress and action in infrastructure
 
Infrastructure Australia today released its fourth review of national infrastructure priorities and
performance, highlighting the vital role of infrastructure in contributing to our national productivity and
quality of life. 
 
The report to the Council of Australian Governments, Progress and Action, includes Infrastructure
Australia’s annual infrastructure priority list.  In releasing the report, Chairman Sir Rod Eddington AO
called on governments, industry and the community to look long and hard at our future infrastructure
needs and the sort of cities and regions we want to live in. 
 
“Our communities deserve appropriate, well-functioning infrastructure and we need to examine ways
to provide these assets at least cost to the community. The results of not doing enough are traffic
congestion, poor access to our export gateways, missed economic opportunities and lower quality of
life,” said Sir Rod.
 
 
“We need to continue to identify and assess infrastructure projects and reforms that provide the
greatest public benefits.
  A focus on stronger strategic planning, improved project prioritisation,
reforms to remove red tape and ongoing efforts to get more from our existing infrastructure assets
need our collective attention,” said Sir Rod. 
 
The report recommends some major reforms in the infrastructure sector.
These include: the agreement to establish single national laws and single regulators for heavy vehicle, rail and maritime safety; and
the decision to involve the private sector more in infrastructure debates, including on the peak Ministerial committee on transport and infrastructure.
 
“This is a great start. But governments, industry and the community must row together to ensure that
agreements in principle are translated in to real change,” said Sir Rod.
 
Sir Rod noted, “In just three years, all of the ready to proceed projects identified in Infrastructure
Australia’s first priority list received funding from the Commonwealth, state and territory governments.”
 
“This is an important testament to the regard for Infrastructure Australia’s work across all
governments. We remain committed to working with governments, industry and the community.”
 
Brisbane’s Cross River Rail project, first submitted by the Queensland Government to Infrastructure
Australia in 2008, has been identified as a new ready to proceed project.  It aims to meet increased
transport demand associated with south east Queensland’s rapidly growing population. 

 
Sir Rod concluded, “In an effort to maintain the transparency of our operations, the report, all public
submissions and our assessment of projects rated as threshold or ready to proceed on the priority list
are available at Infrastructure Australia’s website  www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au .
 
« Last Edit: April 04, 2013, 06:04:19 PM by Fares_Fair »
Regards,
Fares_Fair


Offline ozbob

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Re: Federal election 2013: Articles, discussion etc.
« Reply #79 on: April 04, 2013, 06:02:18 PM »
Twitter

Dr Matthew Burke ‏@drmattburke 34s

Am really worried Tony Abbott today effectively told Brisbane to kiss CrossRiverRail and all future rail improvements goodbye.

===============

Twitter

Dr Matthew Burke ‏@drmattburke 2m

Promising never to fund CrossRiverRail, Brisbane's key need, will do Libs no help in Moreton and Griffith. May help KRudd hold his seat.

===============

Dr Matthew Burke ‏@drmattburke 45m

@Robert_Dow Deeply troubling statements from TonyAbbott. Major implications for Bris Adel Melb Syd Perth SunshineCoast Canberra & Hobart.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2013, 06:58:31 PM by ozbob »
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“You can't understand a city without using its public transportation system.” -- Erol Ozan