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Author Topic: Aging population, implications for public transport  (Read 2588 times)

Online ozbob

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Aging population, implications for public transport
« on: July 09, 2011, 01:38:35 PM »
Transport and Multicultural Affairs
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk
09/07/2011

Road safety can get better with age

A new specialist advisory committee will examine the rules around older driver safety in Queensland, Transport Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk announced today.

The Older Driver Safety Advisory Committee would review research relating to older drivers including crash statistics to provide evidence-based recommendations to government.

Ms Palaszczuk said while older drivers weren't over-represented in crash statistics, the community needed to have confidence in the licensing rules surrounding older drivers.

According to the Federal Government's 2010 Intergenerational Report over the next 40 years the ageing of the population will see the number of people aged 65 to 84 years more than double and the number of people 85 years and over more than quadruple.

"Our population is ageing and this is a good opportunity to review the system and make sure we're getting it right," Ms Palaszczuk said.

The advisory committee will be made up of:

·the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety Queensland (CARRS-Q);

·the RACQ;

·General Practice of Queensland;

·Older People Speak Out;

·Council on the Ageing;

·Queensland Health; and

·The Department of Transport and Main Roads.

"The number of drivers aged 75 and over, as a percentage of all drivers, has increased year on year over the past three years, but their involvement in fatal crashes has decreased during the same period," Ms Palaszczuk said.

Ms Palaszczuk said older drivers had a wealth of driving experience, and were likely to be more tolerant and confident on the road.

"Age can diminish some of our senses, but that's why it's mandatory for all drivers aged 75 years and over to have regular medical condition tests," she said.

"Under Queensland laws older drivers - aged 75 and over - are required to have a current medical certificate on them whenever they're behind the wheel."

Ms Palaszczuk said CARRS-Q would undertake research that would encompass interstate data and world's best practice.

"I've asked the panel to review the research and make any appropriate recommendations later in the year," she said.

===============

An aging population with a loss of mobility has significant implications in terms of public transport access.  Something that has not been well handled of late, new thinking needed ..

===============

Brisbanetimes --> Panel to advise on older driver legislation
« Last Edit: July 09, 2011, 03:56:33 PM by ozbob »
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Offline Golliwog

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Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2011, 02:23:41 PM »
I suppose one of the key questions is, while the number of drivers over 75 has gone up, and their involvement in crashes has gone down, what about the severity of those crashes?
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Offline Jonno

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Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2011, 03:19:07 PM »
Topic was discussed on 4BC's weekend breakfast show.  Discussion highlighted that a lack of public transport particularly off-peak services means that the loss of ability to drive equals social isolation.  It is a deplorable situation and I too would drive beyond what is probably safe if that was the alternative.

Just another topic to add to the State Govtbshame file!!

Online ozbob

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Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2011, 03:26:26 PM »
Yes, remember the great Ipswich FlexiLink fiasco, they actually removed bus routes from retirement homes, and residences that folks had settled for retirement on the basis that they had reasonable mobility even if the bus service was not that frequent, but it was there. Some has been put back in Ipswich but we battle on for Goodna/Bell Bird Park, and others.
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Offline O_128

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2011, 03:48:26 PM »
I would actually advocate free PT for pensioners, if I have to deal with one more paying with change for a ticket of trying to use there go card I think ill end up hurting someone. For example The 230 is scheduled to take 15min between Wynnum/Hawthorne roads and Oxford street, most of the times it takes 5-7 minutes however on the bad days where there is a pensioner getting on at every stop it blows out to 15min. I think everyone would benefit just giving them free transport, It works in japan.
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Online ozbob

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2011, 03:52:54 PM »
Good point, some places in Oz do it as well eg. WA.  Might be the way to get everyone on the go card.

http://www.transperth.wa.gov.au/TicketsandFares/SmartRider/BuyingSmartRider/SeniorsSmartRiders.aspx

Quote
Seniors SmartRider

WA Seniors are entitled to travel for free on all Transperth services between 9.00am and 3.30pm Monday to Friday, all day Saturday and Sunday, as well as public holidays. 

The period of free travel commences from the time of the initial tag on and operates until the completion of the transfer period.  During weekdays (excluding public holidays), if a tag on occurs before 9.00am, normal concession fare rules apply for that journey until the expiry of the transfer period, this period being two hours for travel up to four zones and three hours for travel covering five to nine zones.

The free travel entitlements can only be accessed via SmartRider, Transperth’s electronic ticketing system, so you must have a Seniors SmartRider, Pensioner or Veterans SmartRider to travel for free during these times.

SmartRider is available to all seniors who are in possession of a Western Australian Seniors Card. The Seniors SmartRider combines the Western Australian Seniors Card on one side of the card and the SmartRider on the other. The Seniors SmartRider can therefore be used to gain all the usual Seniors Card benefits such as government concessions, business discounts and Transwa concessions.
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Online ozbob

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2011, 04:15:57 PM »
Sent to all outlets:

9th July 2011

Implications of  ' Road safety can get better with age '

Greetings,

The Minister for Transport has announced the formation of 'The Older Driver Safety Advisory Committee' (see below).  A review of motor vehicle licencing for older citizens is not unwelcome, however there are major implications for mobility of older citizens if and when they are no longer able to drive.  Public transport access for all needs to be established and maintained. As was noted in Ipswich when bus routes were removed from retirement homes and residences where older citizens had settled on the basis that access to bus routes was in place, the effects were serious in terms of loss of mobility and subsequent social isolation.  FlexiLink is not a mass solution.

It may well be time to give Seniors access to free public transport during off peak hours and weekends and public holidays.  This is done in Western Australia for example:

http://www.transperth.wa.gov.au/TicketsandFares/SmartRider/BuyingSmartRider/SeniorsSmartRiders.aspx

Quote
Seniors SmartRider

WA Seniors are entitled to travel for free on all Transperth services between 9.00am and 3.30pm Monday to Friday, all day Saturday and Sunday, as well as public holidays.

The period of free travel commences from the time of the initial tag on and operates until the completion of the transfer period.  During weekdays (excluding public holidays), if a tag on occurs before 9.00am, normal concession fare rules apply for that journey until the expiry of the transfer period, this period being two hours for travel up to four zones and three hours for travel covering five to nine zones.

The free travel entitlements can only be accessed via SmartRider, Transperth’s electronic ticketing system, so you must have a Seniors SmartRider, Pensioner or Veterans SmartRider to travel for free during these times.

SmartRider is available to all seniors who are in possession of a Western Australian Seniors Card. The Seniors SmartRider combines the Western Australian Seniors Card on one side of the card and the SmartRider on the other. The Seniors SmartRider can therefore be used to gain all the usual Seniors Card benefits such as government concessions, business discounts and Transwa concessions.

We would hope that before any legislation is enacted all the community has the opportunity to consult on any proposed changes, and that better public transport options are made available for all.  Much better local feeder buses (station buses) are needed to transport citizens to and from key bus and rail stations.  Park n' ride is at best a part solution and what use is it if one cannot drive?

Best wishes
Robert

Robert Dow
Administration
admin@backontrack.org

=====================
http://statements.cabinet.qld.gov.au/MMS/StatementDisplaySingle.aspx?id=75595

Transport and Multicultural Affairs
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk
09/07/2011

Road safety can get better with age

A new specialist advisory committee will examine the rules around older driver safety in Queensland, Transport Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk announced today.

The Older Driver Safety Advisory Committee would review research relating to older drivers including crash statistics to provide evidence-based recommendations to government.

Ms Palaszczuk said while older drivers weren't over-represented in crash statistics, the community needed to have confidence in the licensing rules surrounding older drivers.

According to the Federal Government's 2010 Intergenerational Report over the next 40 years the ageing of the population will see the number of people aged 65 to 84 years more than double and the number of people 85 years and over more than quadruple.

"Our population is ageing and this is a good opportunity to review the system and make sure we're getting it right," Ms Palaszczuk said.

The advisory committee will be made up of:

·the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety Queensland (CARRS-Q);

·the RACQ;

·General Practice of Queensland;

·Older People Speak Out;

·Council on the Ageing;

·Queensland Health; and

·The Department of Transport and Main Roads.

"The number of drivers aged 75 and over, as a percentage of all drivers, has increased year on year over the past three years, but their involvement in fatal crashes has decreased during the same period," Ms Palaszczuk said.

Ms Palaszczuk said older drivers had a wealth of driving experience, and were likely to be more tolerant and confident on the road.

"Age can diminish some of our senses, but that's why it's mandatory for all drivers aged 75 years and over to have regular medical condition tests," she said.

"Under Queensland laws older drivers - aged 75 and over - are required to have a current medical certificate on them whenever they're behind the wheel."

Ms Palaszczuk said CARRS-Q would undertake research that would encompass interstate data and world's best practice.

"I've asked the panel to review the research and make any appropriate recommendations later in the year," she said.
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline BrizCommuter

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2011, 05:30:36 PM »
Improved public transport is essential to reduce the rate of pensioners driving into swimming pools!

Offline HappyTrainGuy

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2011, 10:50:48 PM »
...to reduce the rate of pensioners driving into swimming pools!
On second level buildings  ;D
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Offline dwb

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2011, 10:03:13 AM »
I would actually advocate free PT for pensioners, if I have to deal with one more paying with change for a ticket of trying to use there go card I think ill end up hurting someone. For example The 230 is scheduled to take 15min between Wynnum/Hawthorne roads and Oxford street, most of the times it takes 5-7 minutes however on the bad days where there is a pensioner getting on at every stop it blows out to 15min. I think everyone would benefit just giving them free transport, It works in japan.

They already get a better deal than everyone else. Let's not be so patnernalistic to assume non of them can use go card, and over time let's focus on getting bigger screens and better angles for the tag on/off machines.

Offline O_128

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2011, 01:19:04 PM »
I would actually advocate free PT for pensioners, if I have to deal with one more paying with change for a ticket of trying to use there go card I think ill end up hurting someone. For example The 230 is scheduled to take 15min between Wynnum/Hawthorne roads and Oxford street, most of the times it takes 5-7 minutes however on the bad days where there is a pensioner getting on at every stop it blows out to 15min. I think everyone would benefit just giving them free transport, It works in japan.

They already get a better deal than everyone else. Let's not be so patnernalistic to assume non of them can use go card, and over time let's focus on getting bigger screens and better angles for the tag on/off machines.

Its not that they cant use it, its that they hobble on, go through there bag, find it, bend down to touch on and check the balance, all of which takes a minute.

I also dont get the whole argument from older drivers, sure there are more accidents in the 18-30 bracket but the amount of stupid accidents in older drivers is the problem, P platers speed but they dont run someone down in a carpark or drive into swimming pools.
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Offline Gazza

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2011, 01:49:07 PM »
I would actually advocate free PT for pensioners, if I have to deal with one more paying with change for a ticket of trying to use there go card I think ill end up hurting someone. For example The 230 is scheduled to take 15min between Wynnum/Hawthorne roads and Oxford street, most of the times it takes 5-7 minutes however on the bad days where there is a pensioner getting on at every stop it blows out to 15min. I think everyone would benefit just giving them free transport, It works in japan.

They already get a better deal than everyone else. Let's not be so patnernalistic to assume non of them can use go card, and over time let's focus on getting bigger screens and better angles for the tag on/off machines.
I've never understood why the elderly often have trouble with technology. They mange to use pokies just fine.

Offline BribieG

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #12 on: July 13, 2011, 09:42:05 PM »
Elderly people really were early adopters of the Internet even back in the days of "Geocities" etc as they could bore their relatives in Canada shitless with photos of the grandkids. I'm into my 60s and actually did a degree in Software Engineering at QUT in my mid 50s - just out of interest, as did my sister in law who enrolled at 50.

I think a major problem with elderly and frail-elderly travellers on QR is the provision of lifts. For example on the Caboolture line there are no lifts between Caboolture and Petrie. The idea is to walk around the level crossing to get to the other platform if you can't manage the stairs. Pretty Third World IMHO. In fact I don't think you can use Dakabin at all if you can't use the overbridge. I see that the lift at the centre island at Bowen Hills has had "lift temporarily out of order" sign on for about a month now. Bums need kicking as there's no level crossing option there either.

And quite obviously that's not confined to the elderly, what about disables. Not bloody good enough.

Offline Stillwater

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Re: Aging population, implications for public transport
« Reply #13 on: July 13, 2011, 10:16:31 PM »

From next year, the great wave of baby boomers start to move into retirement.  Now there is an untapped resource for off-peak travel.

 

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