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Author Topic: QR Accessibility Report  (Read 4325 times)

Offline dwb

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QR Accessibility Report
« on: May 13, 2011, 05:50:39 AM »
Queensland Rail recently undertook some engagement about accessibility. The results are an interesting read, and I hope that some of the feedback is implemented in the station upgrade program.

The page with information can be accessed http://www.queenslandrail.com.au/AllStations/Pages/Accessibilitysurvey.aspx
And the report can be downloaded http://www.queenslandrail.com.au/AllStations/Documents/queensland-rail_accessibility-report_2011.pdf


Quote
Accessibility Report

Our Accessibility Survey invited our customers to share their views, advice, comments, and suggestions on current access to our services and plans for the future. 
 
The survey was made available via the Queensland Rail website, email distribution to disability and community organisations and promoted at City Network Stations.  We asked specific questions in relation to our stations, trains and staff and, encouraged general feedback relating to accessibility.

The results of the survey will help provide greater strategic direction through ensuring the voice of our customers and community are heard.  Enabling us to support our community by delivering an accessible rail network.

Click here to download the Accessibilty Report: Survey and Workshop 2010-2011


Information and feedback

Overall, respondents identified speaking directly to Queensland Rail staff (42%) and checking our website (50%) as their main methods for finding information about station accessibility.

The Queensland Rail website was also identified as the preferred means of receiving this information (63%).

The results showed a strong recognition that the provision of information and the opportunity to provide feedback were important to all respondents.

Our staff

Overall respondents rated our standards of customer service highly.

Responses showed our staff

 - Are polite and friendly (85%)
 - Anticipate customer needs (69%)
 - Provide helpful service (84%)
 - These positive results reflect those achieved in the City Network TransLink customer satisfaction survey, where high levels of satisfaction with customer service are apparent.

Your City network stations

Respondents were provided with two options per category to choose between in relation to station upgrades.   Respondents consistently identified related issues they considered would improve station accessibility.

The most common response by all respondents was a preference to upgrade smaller suburban stations, in particular, those stations with access via stairs only.  In general, respondents identified temporary access solutions as an acceptable alternative to permanent solutions.

A summary of responses relating to City Network stations is provided in the table below:
Access Concern   Preferred Option   Alternative Option
Station Access Upgrades   Upgrade suburban stations (83%)   Upgrade larger stations
Highest priority   Upgrade stations with stair access only (83%)   Upgrade stations with limited access (17%)
Important   Installing station lifts and ramps (56%)   Reducing the gap between train and platform (44%)
Existing steep ramps   Retain steep ramps after lifts installed (96%)   Remove steep ramps (4%)
Access Solutions   Temporary solutions at more stations (60%)   Permanent solutions at fewer stations (40%)
Other strong trends regarding station improvements included:

 - Hazard Tactiles on all platform edges as a public safety initiative
 - Improve quality and quantity of signage (including, more information about which trains leave from which platform)
 - Increase undercover waiting areas
 - More visual or digital information for customers in addition to enhanced auditory information, via the PA system.
 - Hearing Loops

The survey findings indicate that half of the respondents (50%) are satisfied with the availability of information in relation to location of hearing loops at stations. Only 2% considered more information as necessary.  A total of 59% of respondents believe the level of hearing loop information provided is effective.

Some of the general comments about hearing loops are listed below:

 - “I wear hearing aids but don't require the loops. I find most people are already aware of loops.”
 - “Signage in language the user understands eg ‘hearing augmentation’ not user friendly, mention T switch.”

Tactiles

Respondents consistently identified hazard tactiles as a useful reminder to be careful near the platform edge (66%) and, clearly indicate the location of the yellow safety line (63%).

Some of the general comments about tactiles are listed below:

 - “They [tactiles] are a great help in making me feel safer. These should be on ALL suburban stations.”
 - “I don’t have a visual impairment but I find the tactiles useful in making the yellow line more visible/obvious when I drive over them in my wheelchair.”
 - “Directional tactiles also useful when locating entry/exit point.”

Your train

Overall the results showed a strong recognition that use of the boarding ramp can be requested by any customer, if necessary (73%).

The most highly rated responses showed that, if required, respondents:

 - Could reasonably access wheelchair allocated spaces on board services (39%).
 - Could access priority seating (43%).
 - The majority of respondents used either the wheelchair allocated spaces (29%) or priority seating (46%).
 - As part of the survey, respondents were also asked the following open ended question:  What methods could be used to ensure allocated spaces are made available for customers who use wheelchairs or mobility scooters?

Respondents identified similar strategies, which they considered would be most effective.  Key points are summarised below:

 - Wheelchair allocated spaces located immediately to the left or right of the carriage vestibule and doorways.
 - Remove barriers or fold down seating encroaching on wheelchair allocated spaces.
 - Voice announcements advising other customers to be considerate, vacate allocated spaces as required and staff to visually monitor spaces.
 - Suggested that designated pram zones are established to free up space.
 - Colour priority seating differently to other seats.
 - Survey feedback will be further analysed to inform future enhancements to stations, infrastructure projects and rollingstock upgrades.

Survey Respondents

The majority of respondents identified as having a disability (75%), knowing someone with a disability or working in the disability sector (53%).

Overall, respondents used the City Network services on a regular basis (82% identified as everyday commuters, frequent travellers or travelling often).

Accessibility workshop

Queensland Rail held an Accessibility Workshop to review customer feedback in relation to accessibility and promote collaborative input and solutions from Queensland Rail’s senior management and disability sector organisations.

Members of our Senior Executive Leadership Team attended the workshop along with representatives from key organisations, including, Vision Australia, Spinal Injuries Association, Better Hearing Australia, Queenslanders with a Disability Network and Cerebral Palsy League QLD.

Workshop participants were provided with three topics following an analysis of customer feedback.

Summary of key findings - Accessibility Workshop

1. Difficulties at the point of boarding or disembarking from a train relating to: staff assistance, use of access ramp, train/platform interface and train at capacity.

Description: There is a vertical and horizontal gap between the train and platform at a number of stations on the City Network. Queensland Rail provides an access ramp for customers to negotiate these gaps, if requested and certain safety requirements are met.  We have received feedback from customers relating to independently negotiating these gaps, receiving assistance/customer service, other customers boarding first and use of the access ramp.

Key discussion points

 - Innovative design for carriages
 - Raising the height of platforms
 - What needs to occur to remove the need for direct assistance?
 - Options for customers to indicate a need or preference for assistance?

Responses

Use of the access ramp/innovations:

 - Reliable, independent access is preferred, through a combination of innovative solutions for both platforms and rollingstock.
 - Mechanically operated ramps preferable as direct assistance methods are prone to human error.
 - Suggested that a hydraulic lifting device be used to change the angle of the ramp.
 - Caution that hydraulic ramps are ‘fraught’ on buses (i.e. don’t work/high failure rate) - Not good until a fail-safe solution is possible.
 - Making the portable ramps wider to full doorway.
 - Low tech, easy to deploy ramps and well-trained Guard offering appropriate assistance – is a good solution.

Assistance:

 - Suggestion to have a security code operated/self operated facility to request assistance with boarding.
 - Provide push button communication facility with the guard as it is sometimes difficult for customers to see the guard when waiting on the platform.   Additionally, a call button inside the carriage to request assistance.

Platform height:

 - Overall support for raising the height of platforms (in particular, at the boarding point if it is not possible to raise the full length of the platform).    - It is anticipated that this would remove/reduce the vertical gap between the train and platform but a horizontal gap would still remain.
 - Suggested that a ‘gap filler’ be used to reduce the horizontal gap.
 - Lowering the suspension of the carriages to reduce vertical gap will increase independent access

Other comments

 - “Visual displays put in the middle of the carriages for full spread of information, include emergency announcements.”
 - “Hand rails for ramps.”
 - “Review train stopping marks and identified issues with stopping patterns at particular stations.”
 - “Communication of assisted boarding points – better visibility of information regarding boarding point.”

2. Which stations are selected for an access upgrade: how is this decided, transparency of prioritisation and influence from community?

Description: We have 145 stations on the City Network (not inc. the two airport stations) out of these, 63 stations are classed as providing ‘independent access’.  The remaining stations provide either assisted access or stair access.

Independent Access - the ability to enter a station, get to the platform and go between platforms independently without using stairs via a compliant ramp, pathway or lift.

Assisted access - the ability to enter a station, get to the platform and go between platforms via a steep ramp or rail crossing.  People with mobility aids or difficulties with walking may want to be accompanied by a travelling companion for assistance.

Stair access - to enter the station, get to the platform and go between platforms necessitates the use of stairs.
In accordance with the Federal Disability Discrimination Act, 1992 (DDA), the upgrade of rail stations is progressed by Queensland Rail on a multi-level approach.  This approach comprises funding from government, compliance with progressive timeframes and identification of stations where greatest need exists.  Factors taken into account include patronage, current access, intermodal interchange facilities, projected population growth, nearby hospitals, aged care facilities, schools, businesses, other local attractors, and the proximity of the subject station to other stations nearby that are already accessible.


Responses

Prioritisation:

 - Prioritisation criteria used by Queensland Rail should be shared with the disability community and promoted in the public domain to ensure people know how and why decisions are being made.
 - Stations with stair access should have priority over stations with some access and, accordingly, the stations should be weighted more heavily in any assessment.
 - Queensland Rail should still pursue interim measures which can enhance access in addition to full station upgrades (eg. Information for customers with a hearing impairment or tactiles for customers with a vision impairment).
 - Possibly conduct research into the percentage of South East Queensland’s population that can use stairs? Take people with temporary disabilities, parents with prams and older people into consideration.
 - Create a forum where the disability community can choose what stations should be upgraded.
 - There should be a commitment to ensure to funding to achieve accessibility at all stations.
 - Intelligent long term planning needs to be undertaken, with development proposals for hospitals, shopping centers, childcare centers, nursing homes to be linked to the planning processes for public transport provision.

Proximity of other accessible stations:

Should be based on patronage and access to attractors (eg nursing homes etc), and based on a demonstrated need rather than proximity.
Other comments

 - “TGSI’s [tactile ground surface indicators] are a good confidence booster. Cheaper than a lift, can’t afford not to have them!”
 - “Glass access ports [glass barriers or screens along the length of platforms and sliding doors aligned with carriage doors] like Tokyo Subway / KGS system.”
 - “Do Community engagement / mapping, and look at past or future disability services to plan station upgrades. For example, a suburb used to have visibility services. The service relocated, but those people still live in that suburb.”

3. Getting the balance right: assistance available vs independent travel, too much vs too little information.

Description: Queensland Rail has received customer feedback on appropriate levels of assistance depending on a customer’s requirements.    How do we take this into consideration whilst ensuring that we are promoting independent travel and providing accessible services?

Queensland Rail has a renewed focus on providing customer service excellence – ‘delivering customer service excellence is crucial to building a reliable business with loyal customers.’  Our commitments are acknowledged in our Customer Service Charter, which was launched in December 2010.  The charter outlines key areas that are important to our customers; safety, time, information, comfort, surroundings, personal service and feedback. 

Key discussion points

 - How much assistance is too much?
 - Respect, boundaries, dignity, privacy?
 - How information is provided?

Responses

Dignity, respect and assistance:

 - Encourage staff to build-up a rapport with regular customers with disabilities.
 - Consider staff training organised through disability organisations (On-going staff education/package).
 - Ensure staff are trained in how to best offer and provide assistance.  For example, prompts for station staff on offering assistance, direct instructions/procedures for assistance to station staff.
 - Monitor response times after contacting a Guard via the onboard emergency help button (what happens if it is a dangerous situation?) Safety very important.

Information:

 - Provide an “SMS service register” - Customers with disabilities (or their families) submit their details on a voluntary basis, and are notified in case of diversions, breakdowns etc.
 - Audio/visual information - Simple symbols eg. ‘Exit’, use of arrows on platforms, written, verbal announcements, informal communications, SMS/emails (Different communication mediums to cover all customers).
 - Important to provide the right information – think about what is critical for a customer with disabilities when planning a journey (i.e. lifts working, is there an accessible toilet?)
 - A system needs to be created. This is not just Queensland Rail’s responsibility, but the wider community - we all have a social responsibility.
 - Provide information for customers on how to seek assistance in extraordinary situations.  For example, how to use the emergency and disability assistance phone, what to do if worried about personal safety, developing a ‘Plan B’, use of the core zone.   Develop information sessions to train/educate travelers
 - Changing the wording on the assistance phone so it’s not just ‘emergency’ and teach people how to use (eg. features and locations).

Conclusions

The feedback from the workshop has been distributed internally to the relevant business areas with Queensland Rail.  Solutions and recommendations will be reviewed and where appropriate, investigated and progressed.

Additionally, feedback will be presented to and reviewed by members of Queensland Rail’s DDA Reference Group.  Members of this group are drawn from a cross section of community and advocacy groups representing people with disabilities.  Workshop and survey feedback will inform the priorities of this group for 2011 and Queensland Rails Accessibility Team.

justanotheruser

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2011, 08:54:35 PM »
I believe they have untill 2026 to make all stations wheelchair friendly or face fines.  The rubbish arrangements now of catching a train in the opposite direction to your destination and changing at another station are awful. Especially when the train to your destination leaves 5 minutes before you get there meaning a long wait in off-peak.

Online ozbob

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2011, 03:56:24 AM »
Queensland Rail, along with many other operators around the nation has inherited an aging transport infrastructure set up in a different era.  It is long and expensive task making all stations fully DDA compliant.  QR do put a lot of effort in engaging with the community who have particular issues.  I have attended accessibility  workshops and seminars and have been extremly impressed with the dedicated efforts to fix everything up.  But it is huge task and one that is very dependent on funds. For example a station like Taringa has to be rebuilt essentially, and there are many others.  Some of these stations are 80 or 90 years old, it takes time.  It is not a perfect world, but they are getting there.  I am very aware of the inconvenience some passengers face daily, but QR does what it can to assist.  As do construction alliances when appropriate.

The whole notion of 'fining' the operators is just nonsense.  It is fining ourselves.  Rather, step up efforts to get funding for QR to continue their extensive upgrade programs
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Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2011, 06:42:22 AM »
I believe 100% compliance with DDA must be by 2022.

Offline Golliwog

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2011, 08:24:42 AM »
I believe 100% compliance with DDA must be by 2022.

But if we put that on the pedestal as the major achievement we want, are the services going to stagnate? There's only so much money to be spread around, I would rather targeted station upgrades whilst continuing to upgrade the service frequency. While making all stations DDA compliant would be fantastic, I would prefer they consult with those who really need it and focus on the stations that they actually use first.
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Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2011, 01:01:29 PM »
I believe 100% compliance with DDA must be by 2022.

But if we put that on the pedestal as the major achievement we want, are the services going to stagnate? There's only so much money to be spread around, I would rather targeted station upgrades whilst continuing to upgrade the service frequency. While making all stations DDA compliant would be fantastic, I would prefer they consult with those who really need it and focus on the stations that they actually use first.

2022 was the deadline from the legislation I believe passed Federally in 1999. We're talking about a long time here and if you think you can only do targeted upgrades then you don't understand the objectives of the act, nor the difficulties faced by disabled people in the community.

justanotheruser

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2011, 03:46:00 PM »
Queensland Rail, along with many other operators around the nation has inherited an aging transport infrastructure set up in a different era.  It is long and expensive task making all stations fully DDA compliant.  QR do put a lot of effort in engaging with the community who have particular issues.  I have attended accessibility  workshops and seminars and have been extremly impressed with the dedicated efforts to fix everything up.  But it is huge task and one that is very dependent on funds. For example a station like Taringa has to be rebuilt essentially, and there are many others.  Some of these stations are 80 or 90 years old, it takes time.  It is not a perfect world, but they are getting there.  I am very aware of the inconvenience some passengers face daily, but QR does what it can to assist.  As do construction alliances when appropriate.

The whole notion of 'fining' the operators is just nonsense.  It is fining ourselves.  Rather, step up efforts to get funding for QR to continue their extensive upgrade programs
Considering the amount of time rail operators have had to do this work and some (yes NSW I'm looking at you!) refusing to cater to passengers needs and requests but rather responding with "Sorry there is no room in the architects plan for a lift" I have very little sympathy. Perhaps instead of doing simple cosmetic appeareance facelifts they could put some of that money into actually making all stations accessable.

Offline mufreight

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2011, 07:20:15 PM »
2022 was the deadline from the legislation I believe passed Federally in 1999. We're talking about a long time here and if you think you can only do targeted upgrades then you don't understand the objectives of the act, nor the difficulties faced by disabled people in the community.

Yet despite the awareness of the requirements of this Federal leglislation the platforms at Brunswick Street (Fortitude Valley) and Indooroopilly were not raised so that they would be compliant in their rebuilds nor has Oxley and Darra where not only were old platforms rebuilt but new platforms have been built that do not comply with the Federal disability access leglisation.
How many more of these on the cheap upgrades will take place, it will be far preferable to upgrade these stations that are to be upgraded to full compliance even were it to mean that less of these tart ups such as at Oxley took place each year are undertaken each year.
The funds are limited that is fact but preferable that these upgrades be to a standard that is fully compliant rather than half do more stations none of which will be compliant in 2022.

Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2011, 12:02:09 AM »
I understand what you are saying mufreight and I agree to a certain extent. Where major upgrades have been undertaken platforms should have ben raised along the full length.

However, the disability community is not just composed of those in wheelchairs and the disability community is not the only one that benefits from station upgrades, general users, young and aged and even the general community still benefit from minor works such as the installation of TGSIs, hearing loops, new information screens and signage. The cost of these is minor compared to a rebuild yet still make significant improvements for many people who use the station in the meantime while waiting for a more major upgrade to provide accessibility and architecturally improved stations to occur.

I think, and the disability community who QR engaged with seems to too, that in the interim improvements should be spread across a greater number of stations, rather than at just a few major rebuilds. If you haven't already I would highly recommend you read the original link.

What your contention is probably really with, is that this is not a $200mil station renovation program. This is more like $100mil in station upgrades (the likes of Eagle Junction) and $100mil in overdue maintenance and minor works. For example if I just repaint my house or change a lightbulb, I don't call it a renovation... only if I'm changing the flooring, verandah, toilets, roof, adding an extension do I then call it a renovation.

But, the pollies obviously decided they liked the sound of a $200mil better.... you could probably say they added an extra inch to make themselves feel bigger than they actually are!

Offline mufreight

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2011, 10:39:46 AM »
The raising of platforms not only impacts on disability access but also on the safety and ease of access for all commuters with a reduction in dwell times adding to the reliability of timetabled operation of services.
As an aside to this were an entire section of line equipped with full height platforms then subject to the provision of closed circut video equipment the enabled the visibility of the entire length of the train by the drivers driver only operation would be possible making the possibility of higher frequency services without additional staff.

At Taringa due to the confined width of the rail corridor the present station should be a total rebuild with the island platform on the mains rermoved and rebuilt on the Toowong side of the existing station to allow the reconstruction and widening of the platform on the subs to make both platforms compliant in terms of both width and height in accordance with the 2022 requirements.

justanotheruser

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2011, 01:37:43 PM »
2022 was the deadline from the legislation I believe passed Federally in 1999. We're talking about a long time here and if you think you can only do targeted upgrades then you don't understand the objectives of the act, nor the difficulties faced by disabled people in the community.

Yet despite the awareness of the requirements of this Federal leglislation the platforms at Brunswick Street (Fortitude Valley) and Indooroopilly were not raised so that they would be compliant in their rebuilds nor has Oxley and Darra where not only were old platforms rebuilt but new platforms have been built that do not comply with the Federal disability access leglisation.
How many more of these on the cheap upgrades will take place, it will be far preferable to upgrade these stations that are to be upgraded to full compliance even were it to mean that less of these tart ups such as at Oxley took place each year are undertaken each year.
The funds are limited that is fact but preferable that these upgrades be to a standard that is fully compliant rather than half do more stations none of which will be compliant in 2022.

Have you got a link to those requirements. I'd be interested in reading them.

Offline Gazza

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2011, 03:14:56 PM »
Yet despite the awareness of the requirements of this Federal leglislation the platforms at Brunswick Street (Fortitude Valley) ...were not raised
I thought FV was raised for at least part of the length.

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2011, 03:21:04 PM »
Yes, so called 'camel humps' --> http://railbotforum.org/mbs/index.php?topic=145.msg2675#msg2675
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somebody

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2011, 04:53:03 PM »
The one I just don't understand is Fortitude Valley.  There really was no excuse for not doing the job properly.  In some cases, when the rear 3 cars are locked the camel humps do not line up with any opening door!  With the length of the closedown, doing the job for the full length along a straight platform edge would have added little if any time to the closedown.

I also don't understand what is with the idea that we should do 8 projects half baked rather than doing 6 jobs properly.  Salisbury-Kuraby, MCH-KEP, CAB-Beerb, I am looking at you!

At Taringa due to the confined width of the rail corridor the present station should be a total rebuild with the island platform on the mains rermoved and rebuilt on the Toowong side of the existing station to allow the reconstruction and widening of the platform on the subs to make both platforms compliant in terms of both width and height in accordance with the 2022 requirements.
I'm probably going to raise some ire here, but I don't see the need for the platform on the mains at Taringa at all.  If there is really going to be a closedown preventing access to the suburbans, then provision of a bus service is significantly cheaper than wasting millions on a platform which will rarely be used.

Offline SurfRail

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2011, 05:40:50 PM »
I'm probably going to raise some ire here, but I don't see the need for the platform on the mains at Taringa at all.  If there is really going to be a closedown preventing access to the suburbans, then provision of a bus service is significantly cheaper than wasting millions on a platform which will rarely be used.

I'm on your side.  My preference would have been to convert the line to up-up-down-down for simpler interchanging between express and all stations runs, but the Richlands junction pretty much prevents that... 

Instead, you could simply have a single island platform between the suburbans at every station except Milton, Indooropilly and Darra (express interchanges/junctions) and Toowong (too expensive to rebuild and 3/4 may be used eventually).  Corinda does not need more than 2 platforms for the services it sustains.  Long term, the tracks should be slewed around Oxley to provide 2 express tracks through where the poorly design (and superfluous) 3rd platform is, and the existing freight track can probably be left in place on the other side.
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Online ozbob

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2011, 05:48:10 PM »
One of the big advantages is the redundancy of the 4 platforms through from Corinda to town.  Often the suburbans are on the mains for various reasons.  I have a feeling though that the peak express bypassing of Toowong is only a temporary timetable thing -  the public squeals are going to be big come June 6 I think.   I have little doubt that the LNP will go to the next election with a commitment to make the expresses stop at Toowong .. there is a lot of local politics involved ...
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Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2011, 10:33:54 PM »
I also don't understand what is with the idea that we should do 8 projects half baked rather than doing 6 jobs properly.  Salisbury-Kuraby, MCH-KEP, CAB-Beerb, I am looking at you!


Most of the stations in the upgrade program that are getting money spent on them aren't getting anywhere near the $33mil spent on Fortitude Valley or $26mil spent on Indooroopilly. If it is a major upgrade then I fully agree, they should be done properly, but practically speaking they will need to spend money on stations before they get major upgrades, so they might as well just get on and spend the money so everyone can have better information, TGSIs, signage and lighting because its just not possible to go out an spend $30mil on 146 stations or however many they have at once (that is ~$4.4billion). So in the meantime, they are spending $200mil on 50 stations... you can't have everything at once, its a fact of life!

Offline petey3801

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2011, 10:34:59 PM »
One of the big advantages is the redundancy of the 4 platforms through from Corinda to town.  Often the suburbans are on the mains for various reasons.  I have a feeling though that the peak express bypassing of Toowong is only a temporary timetable thing -  the public squeals are going to be big come June 6 I think.   I have little doubt that the LNP will go to the next election with a commitment to make the expresses stop at Toowong .. there is a lot of local politics involved ...

I, for one, certainly hope the expresses don't start stopping at Toowong. The "express" trains are slow enough as it is, without adding yet another stop!
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Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2011, 10:39:42 PM »
Have you got a link to those requirements. I'd be interested in reading them.

My understanding is that the Act refers to an Australian standard, rather than spelling out all the requirements at once.

HREOC A brief guide to DDA
http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/dda_guide/dda_guide.htm

Wikipedia entry
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disability_Discrimination_Act_1992

The Act as hosted by comlaw.gov.au
http://www.comlaw.gov.au/ComLaw/Legislation/ActCompilation1.nsf/0%2F/31452800B62A28B7CA256FC00020014A/$file/DisabilityDiscrimination1992_WD02.pdf

DIP Transit Oriented Development Guide (I believe it has a chapter that includes the QR station technical standards which references requirements like visual difference in TGSIs, ramp angles, ballustrade heights, lighting requirements etc.)
http://www.dlgp.qld.gov.au/local-area-planning/transit-oriented-development-guide.html

Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2011, 10:43:18 PM »
Further, there is an interesting tender available from WA about accessibility at http://bit.ly/lSCyVC

Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2011, 10:52:05 PM »
A quick skim of the act and it refers to "disability standards"... after googleing for "disability standard access to public transport" I found the link to the standard, also hosted on comlaw.gov.au

http://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/F2005C00261

Also, the target date for full compliance with the standards, is generally 2022, however rail and tram are extended to 2032.

Offline mufreight

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2011, 07:12:38 AM »
One of the big advantages is the redundancy of the 4 platforms through from Corinda to town.  Often the suburbans are on the mains for various reasons.  I have a feeling though that the peak express bypassing of Toowong is only a temporary timetable thing -  the public squeals are going to be big come June 6 I think.   I have little doubt that the LNP will go to the next election with a commitment to make the expresses stop at Toowong .. there is a lot of local politics involved ...

I, for one, certainly hope the expresses don't start stopping at Toowong. The "express" trains are slow enough as it is, without adding yet another stop!

Petey3801, the timetable commencing from June 6th has sufficent fat in the running times for the express services to make the stop at Toowoong without any change to the timetabled running times between Darra and Roma Street.

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2011, 07:50:46 AM »
Petey3801, the timetable commencing from June 6th has sufficent fat in the running times for the express services to make the stop at Toowoong without any change to the timetabled running times between Darra and Roma Street.
Most of the fat is in the Indro-Darra section though.  Just over 60km/h average speed Milton-Indro isn't half bad with the numerous 50km/h speed restrictions in that section.  Although I have an issue with 3 minutes Milton-Roma St on the mains. (1.5km)

Offline petey3801

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2011, 08:52:26 AM »
One of the big advantages is the redundancy of the 4 platforms through from Corinda to town.  Often the suburbans are on the mains for various reasons.  I have a feeling though that the peak express bypassing of Toowong is only a temporary timetable thing -  the public squeals are going to be big come June 6 I think.   I have little doubt that the LNP will go to the next election with a commitment to make the expresses stop at Toowong .. there is a lot of local politics involved ...

I, for one, certainly hope the expresses don't start stopping at Toowong. The "express" trains are slow enough as it is, without adding yet another stop!

Petey3801, the timetable commencing from June 6th has sufficent fat in the running times for the express services to make the stop at Toowoong without any change to the timetabled running times between Darra and Roma Street.

And you're naive enough to think they would add a stop without putting more time into the Timetable (whether there is enough 'fat' in it or not!)?
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Online ozbob

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2011, 09:13:32 AM »
Came into town this morning on the 7.43am ex Darra limited express, stops Oxley Corinda Indooroopilly Toowong then Roma St,  Central  8.06am - 23 minutes.  Might be the last time for this pattern for me ...
« Last Edit: May 18, 2011, 07:36:33 PM by ozbob »
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Offline mufreight

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2011, 07:29:55 PM »
One of the big advantages is the redundancy of the 4 platforms through from Corinda to town.  Often the suburbans are on the mains for various reasons.  I have a feeling though that the peak express bypassing of Toowong is only a temporary timetable thing -  the public squeals are going to be big come June 6 I think.   I have little doubt that the LNP will go to the next election with a commitment to make the expresses stop at Toowong .. there is a lot of local politics involved ...

I, for one, certainly hope the expresses don't start stopping at Toowong. The "express" trains are slow enough as it is, without adding yet another stop!

Petey3801, the timetable commencing from June 6th has sufficent fat in the running times for the express services to make the stop at Toowoong without any change to the timetabled running times between Darra and Roma Street.

And you're naive enough to think they would add a stop without putting more time into the Timetable (whether there is enough 'fat' in it or not!)?

Even were they to add a minute to the timetable to service a station that has the passenger loadings of Toowoong is no great tragedy and of minimal effect.  Passenger services are that, a service for passengers and making the services as passenger friendly as possible encourages patronage.

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2011, 09:17:34 PM »
I'm probably going to raise some ire here, but I don't see the need for the platform on the mains at Taringa at all.  If there is really going to be a closedown preventing access to the suburbans, then provision of a bus service is significantly cheaper than wasting millions on a platform which will rarely be used.

I'm on your side.  My preference would have been to convert the line to up-up-down-down for simpler interchanging between express and all stations runs, but the Richlands junction pretty much prevents that... 
The other point is that the elimination of the platform could allow for a straighter path and a higher speed through this section.

Offline mufreight

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2011, 06:40:06 PM »
I'm probably going to raise some ire here, but I don't see the need for the platform on the mains at Taringa at all.  If there is really going to be a closedown preventing access to the suburbans, then provision of a bus service is significantly cheaper than wasting millions on a platform which will rarely be used.

I'm on your side.  My preference would have been to convert the line to up-up-down-down for simpler interchanging between express and all stations runs, but the Richlands junction pretty much prevents that... 
The other point is that the elimination of the platform could allow for a straighter path and a higher speed through this section.

The simple answer, redundency.

somebody

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2011, 06:59:22 PM »
I think we may have to agree to disagree on that point.

Offline Golliwog

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2011, 08:08:43 PM »
I think we may have to agree to disagree on that point.

I'm with mu on this one. Redundancy of this type is necessary.
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Offline dwb

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Re: QR Accessibility Report
« Reply #30 on: May 20, 2011, 04:22:52 AM »
The simple answer, redundency.

So all the global metro systems around the world with two tracks and two platforms??

I agree with Simon, it's something that can be solved through operational approach.

 

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