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Author Topic: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion  (Read 20089 times)

Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #160 on: November 04, 2018, 01:01:20 PM »
https://twitter.com/CrStuartJames/status/1058916789759836160
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Offline Stillwater

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #161 on: November 04, 2018, 04:54:41 PM »
$53 BILLION.   :yikes: The price for doing nothing.

Offline #Metro

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #162 on: November 04, 2018, 08:42:20 PM »

Quote
$53 BILLION.   :yikes: The price for doing nothing.

I generally don't trust a forward-looking statement. You have to see how it was derived.
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #163 on: November 05, 2018, 01:34:41 AM »
Brisbanetimes --> We are spending billions on infrastructure but still struggling to keep up

Quote
Record infrastructure spending in NSW and Victoria is struggling just to maintain current assets, new figures show, as transport and other services groan under the weight of population growth.

The KPMG analysis of state and federal government capital expenditure shows of the 4 per cent growth in public spending on infrastructure, more than 3.5 per cent is needed just to cover depreciation and population growth, leaving a fraction for a "pure" net increase in stock.

Victoria has the lowest net increase of all the eastern states, courtesy of a population boom that has seen Melbourne become one of the fastest growing cities in the developed world at close to 3 per cent annually.

The headline figures of $80 billion being spent on new infrastructure over the next four years in NSW and $40 billion in Victoria - up to double the average of the previous decade - mask the daily struggle of infrastructure to keep up.

KPMG chief economist Brendan Rynne said just "to stand still" Australia needs to spend about $45 billion on public sector assets each year.

"Every politician loves to be seen at the turning of sod of a government project, a new railway, a new highway, or the commissioning of a new bit of kit, like a new frigate or a new MRI machine," he said.

"One challenge though is for the public to understand whether enough is being spent, and just looking at annual spend levels doesn’t provide a full picture of the situation."

He said Commonwealth infrastructure spending peaked in 2010 through federal government stimulus during the global financial crisis and continued to grow after but state and local government expenditures pulled back until 2016.

Since then, both Victoria and NSW have been lifting their investment through large projects such as the Metro Tunnel in Melbourne and Sydney's light rail.

On a per capita basis smaller population jurisdictions such as South Australia and the Northern Territory, are spending relatively more than the more populous states.

Mr Rynne said that despite those larger investments, public infrastructure spending remained inadequate - with total government spending reaching $86 billion in 2017, $14 billion short of the approximately $100 billion required to maintain and create better services.

But his report, first presented at the Australia Institute's revenue summit, found that the government had been good at maximising public sector investment during economic downturns to stimulate the economy.

"That is, when the economy is running strong and the private sector is growing its investment spend, public sector spending should taper off a bit – in essence so it doesn’t add to any inflationary pressures building up in the economy – and when the economy is slowing, public sector spending should ramp," he said.

Economists are expecting slightly weaker growth figures for the next quarter when the national accounts are released in December after a bumper three months to September saw Australia hit 3.4 per cent - among the fastest rates in the developed world.

Soft inflation figures released on Wednesday have some floating the prospect of the Reserve Bank cutting interest rates, despite the bank maintaining the next move will be up. The board is due to meet again on Tuesday.

“With the September inflation rate coming in at 1.9 per cent, which is below the Reserve Bank target, the case is building for an interest rate cut," said Ernst & Young's, Sydney Managing Partner, Andrew Price.

He said the the negative wealth effect of falling house prices, combined with tight credit conditions and low inflation would bring monetary policy back to the fore.

“The Sydney housing market is facing its most significant downturn since the 1990s," he said.

"Reserve Bank policy will now determine whether it’s a correction or a crash.”
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #164 on: November 05, 2018, 07:30:00 AM »
I am extremely suspicious of consultant reports like the above.

If true, these proposals will price themselves out of existence with costs like that.

Raw spending is also a poor way to look at "investment".

As we have seen, it is entirely possible to spend big on infrastructure and get poor benefit.

Sinking funds into mass park and ride, for example.

On the other hand, cost neutral projects like mass bus reform would give enormous benefit.
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #165 on: December 11, 2018, 01:49:34 AM »
https://twitter.com/railbotforum/status/1072156098444980225
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #166 on: December 11, 2018, 10:42:14 AM »
https://twitter.com/InfraAust/status/1072289894234415104
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #167 on: December 11, 2018, 10:43:31 AM »
https://infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/policy-publications/publications/planning-liveable-cities.aspx

Planning Liveable Cities: A place-based approach to sequencing infrastructure and growth

Planning Liveable Cities: A place-based approach to sequencing infrastructure and growth is the eighth paper in Infrastructure Australia's Reform Series.

The paper provides advice to governments, industry, and the community on how to appropriately sequence the delivery of housing and infrastructure.

Based on a review of Australia's five largest cities – Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide – the paper finds there are six challenges common to all of these cities when sequencing infrastructure and housing. The paper makes nine recommendations for an overhaul of the way we deliver new housing and infrastructure in our largest cities, proposing changes to current planning systems, governance frameworks, and funding arrangements to better manage our rapid population growth.

Documents --> https://infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/policy-publications/publications/planning-liveable-cities.aspx
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #168 on: December 12, 2018, 02:08:11 PM »
Definitely more infill is needed to increase density. Apartment design needs to be tweaked so we have unique structures not just square boxes. More 3-4 bedroom apartments should be built in the mix and compulsory cross ventilation factored in for each new build. Mixed use in some areas E.g. Residential, Retail and offices are essential for the viability of new apartment builds.

Transit oriented developments ✓
Density infill leading to a viable driverless Metro network ✓
1,2,3,4 Bedroom Apartments✓
Mixed Apartment Developments with full line supermarkets, gyms, offices. etc...
Active transport and segregated Bikeways✓
Traffic calming✓
Pedestrian and cycle priority  at inner city and suburban intersections✓
Regional cities connected with fast electric  rail Bne to Toowoomba, Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast/Bundaberg✓
Plus more......✓

Offline Stillwater

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #169 on: January 14, 2019, 12:07:46 PM »
Infrastructure Australia new head, Romilly Madew, was head of the Green Building Council of Australia … so will we see more public transport projects on the IA priority list as opposed to roads-based initiatives?

We should not get our hopes up though.  Governments look to IA not so much to produce a 'priority list' of projects, but a menu from which to choose.  If project No.5 on the list happens to be in a marginal electorate around election time, it tends to go to the top of the list magically, and gets funded.  Also, expect some whacky announcements being made at election time along the lines of "we will fund this project, subject to a business case analysis by Infrastructure Australia".  In other words, projects not on the list find their way on the IA projects list based upon political whim.

Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #170 on: January 14, 2019, 12:51:52 PM »
https://twitter.com/InfraAust/status/1084597839311777792
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #171 on: January 28, 2019, 01:31:04 PM »
John Menadue – Pearls and Irritations

LUKE FRASER. The roads that ate the Australian economy – Part 1 of 2

>>  https://www.johnmenadue.com/luke-fraser-the-roads-that-ate-the-australian-economy-part-1-of-2/

LUKE FRASER. The roads that ate the Australian economy Part 2 of 2

>>  https://www.johnmenadue.com/luke-fraser-the-roads-that-ate-the-australian-economy-part-2-of-2/

Worth a read ..

Luke Fraser is the founder and principal of a transport policy and investment advisory. In 2012 he was appointed to the board of the Prime Minister and Premiers Road Reform Project. From the late 1990s he spent over a decade in Canberra in several APS executive, Commonwealth government chief of staff and national industry CEO roles across the transport and defence sectors.
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #172 on: February 11, 2019, 08:19:35 PM »
Quote
This Thursday, @InfraAust will launch the 2019 #InfrastructurePriorityList. One of the most significant publications in our 10-year history, it identifies the investments we need to improve Australian living standards and #productivity. #infrastructure #auspol https://t.co/FFAgCuFLtQ


https://twitter.com/InfraAust/status/1094745998662938626

Offline Stillwater

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #173 on: February 11, 2019, 10:49:04 PM »
Just in time for Coalition and Labor to trawl through the projects, compare them with marginal seats and announce key projects in the lead-up to the May federal election.  Don't expect projects near the top of the list to be funded if they are needed urgently but happen to be in a safe seat.  Pollies always see this list as a menu, not a schedule of projects to be rolled out in order.

Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #174 on: February 14, 2019, 02:02:36 AM »
Couriermail --> Pacific Motorway upgrade hits the fast lane

Quote
FIXING traffic chaos on the Pacific Motorway all the way from Brisbane’s southern suburbs to the border has been added to the latest list of national priorities by Infrastructure Australia.

Almost $2 billion of upgrades to separate sections at the northern and southern ends of the M1 had previously been included in the list. But the independent body now says the whole route from Eight Mile Plains to Tugun should be treated as a single high priority initiative.

Infrastructure Australia acting CEO Anna Chau said it was important to view it as one corridor and there was a risk that in solving one bottleneck, the problem was just moved further along.

The move adds improvements to an additional 50km of the crucial route between Daisy Hill and Nerang and Infrastructure Australia says the issue is so critical it should be addressed within five years to alleviate crippling congestion.

“The M1 motorway is one of the busiest roads in Australia, carrying in excess of 150,000 vehicles per day, including over 12,000 heavy vehicles,’’ the new report says.

“The section between Eight Mile Plains and Tugun cannot currently accommodate this volume of traffic and, as a result, experiences frequent and prolonged periods of congestion.

“Current traffic volumes exceed the design capacity of the motorway, creating congestion with nationally significant impacts on productivity,” it says.

“The lack of an alternative route exacerbates congestion issues when there are incidents on the motorway.”

Fast population growth across the region, especially on the Gold Coast, and people commuting to Brisbane to work are driving the increase in traffic.

Without action, the report warns, congestion will cost 89,767 “vehicle hours’’ of delays every day by 2036.

The State and Federal Governments last year agreed to pay about $1 billion each to improve the M1 sections between Eight Mile Plains and Daisy Hill, and between Varsity Lakes and Tugun.

The high priority initiative now adds stretches from Daisy Hill to Loganholme, and from Loganholme to Nerang.

The costs involved are not yet known.

The M1 fix is one of four Queensland projects added to the latest Infrastructure Australia priority list.

The others include addressing congestion and accidents by upgrading the Centenary Motorway in Brisbane’s western corridor. Weekday traffic levels are projected to soar from 100,000 to 150,000 by 2036.

The proposal includes on and off-ramp improvements, greater use of smart traffic technology and widening the road.

Upgrading the Warrego Highway between Ipswich and Helidon Spa, east of Toowoomba is a new priority initiative, aimed at improving safety, capacity and floodproofing. The rate of fatal crashes there is up to 10 times motorway standard.

The report also prioritises better public transport between Broadbeach and Burleigh Heads on the Gold Coast, probably by expanding the light rail system to take pressure off the roads.

Nationally, the Infrastructure Australia list has a record 121 proposals worth $58 billion. New additions include a national charging network for electric vehicles and a program to ease overcrowding in remote housing.
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Offline Stillwater

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #175 on: February 14, 2019, 08:41:22 AM »
It is interesting that IA puts Beerburrum-Nambour rail upgrade (a High Priority Project) ahead of CRR (a High Priority Initiative).  Splitting hairs, I know.  Much of the overall list seems worthy of immediate or 'near term' action.

Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #176 on: February 14, 2019, 08:50:32 AM »
2019 Infrastructure Priority List: Project and initiative summaries

https://infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/policy-publications/publications/Infrastructure-Priority-List-Project-and-Initiative-Summaries-2019.aspx
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #177 on: February 14, 2019, 08:58:25 AM »
It is interesting that IA puts Beerburrum-Nambour rail upgrade (a High Priority Project) ahead of CRR (a High Priority Initiative).  Splitting hairs, I know.  Much of the overall list seems worthy of immediate or 'near term' action.

It's somewhat embarrassing for our state government that it is still unable to get CRR above initiative. Other states have their respective acts together, here the bumblers are still there bumbling.

#2tracks was a high priority project 10 years ago ...
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #178 on: February 14, 2019, 09:01:05 AM »
https://twitter.com/ozbob13/status/1095818328935825408
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #179 on: February 14, 2019, 11:29:00 AM »
https://twitter.com/ozbob13/status/1095852844727492608
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #180 on: April 29, 2019, 11:47:59 AM »
https://twitter.com/InfraAust/status/1122662712381546496
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #181 on: May 13, 2019, 01:49:07 PM »
https://twitter.com/railbotforum/status/1127782514976681984
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #182 on: August 13, 2019, 02:06:49 AM »
The Australian --> Billions for big projects must roll on: report

Quote
A $200 billion ­investment pipeline in major projects over the next five years must be replicated on a rolling basis for the next 15 years and beyond to prevent living standards from going backwards, a landmark infrastructure audit has warned.

It shows that Scott Morrison’s $100bn infrastructure spending boom and ­record levels of state funding for key projects will not be enough to ease the pressures posed by a growing population.

The Infrastructure Australia report finds that living standards are under threat from spiralling road-congestion costs, rising ­energy bills, growing pressure on utility networks and a need for more investment in inner-city health and education services.

The audit lashes governments for inadequate spending and policy inconsistency, which it argues have stalled private investment in key sectors including energy generation and transmission.

According to Infrastructure Australia — set up by Labor in 2008 to advise all levels of government on infrastructure needs — the annual cost of road congestion is projected to grow by $18.9bn to $38.8bn in just over a decade, without further investment.

It finds that energy prices have risen 50 per cent since the last audit, an increase it blames on an “absence of decisive federal leadership”, a “lack of certainty on ­energy or emissions policy” and a “lack of co-ordination across Australia’s governments on how best to manage changes” in the country’s energy mix.

“The result has been a worse deal for many users,” it found.

Infrastructure Australia chairman Julieanne Alroe warned that inaction on the agency’s reform blueprint would cost the economy tens of billions of dollars in extra congestion, higher prices and lost time each year.

Ms Alroe said that, although government spending was at ­record levels, there was “much more to do” to ensure businesses could compete on the world stage.

“Rather than a short-term boom, the historic level of activity we are seeing in the sector must, and is likely, to continue for the next 15 years and potentially ­beyond,” Ms Alroe said.

“This must be the new normal if we are to meet the challenges and opportunities ahead.”

Australia’s population is forecast to increase to 31.4 million people over the next 15 years. Infrastructure Australia says that spending in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth is failing to keep pace with population growth — especially in the outer suburbs.

While 96 per cent of people living in the inner city are within walking distance of public transport, only 34 per cent of Australians living in the suburbs are able to walk to a transport connection. Those in regional and remote areas are worse off, with services falling “below what is ­acceptable” for a developed nation.

Ms Alroe said these remote communities were struggling with overcrowded social housing, limited access to drinking water, inadequate transport and poor telecommunications, which led to poorer health standards and a lower quality of life.

The report also ramped up calls for greater investment in ­infrastructure on the fringes of cities and outlined an ­urgent need for governments to address the growing skills gap, which poses a threat to the rollout of an elevated program of construction.

Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe has pleaded for ­increased spending on public works to stimulate the stagnating economy and revive flagging productivity; and Australian Industry Group chief Innes Willox has pushed Scott Morrison to tackle the skills shortage, which he said was threatening the delivery of the unprecedented pipeline of infrastructure projects.

Deputy Prime Minister ­Michael McCormack has spruiked the more than 270 major projects under construction or development, but the level of spending on major projects is due to peak in 2022, before declining sharply.

Labor has been pressuring the government to drag forward the timeline for dozens of projects to help kickstart economic growth.

The Infrastructure Australia audit says dense cities such as Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne will require funding for high-capacity public transport and a renewal of inner-city hospitals and schools.

Congestion is resulting in ­extended commuting times, across the nation. Workers on ­average spent 4½ hours a week commuting in 2017, according to the results of the Melbourne Institute’s latest annual household survey — an increase of 23 per cent compared with 2002.

Although $123bn of construction work has started since the inaugural 2015 audit, Infrastructure Australia’s executive director of policy and research, Peter Cola­cino, said the imminent five-year $200bn in spending by federal and state governments needed to be extended into the long term. “The idea that you’re ever finished building is just not right,” Mr Cola­cino said. “I wouldn’t say the picture is bleak — I would say we’re performing quite well. But the pressures are going to continue to grow.”

Dr Kennedy, who takes over from outgoing Treasury secretary Phil Gaetjens next month, ­recently questioned the viability of increasing the number of infrastructure projects planned over the next four years.

With so many large projects on the horizon, Australia faces the prospect of not having enough skilled workers to handle the major works, while city dwellers are at risk of construction fatigue.

Dr Lowe, who appeared before a parliament committee on Friday, called for a range of small-scale projects across regional Australia to be rolled out. Josh Frydenberg has asked Treasury to examine whether some projects in the decade-long infrastructure plan could be brought forward.

Just a third of the $30bn worth of new spending announced in this year’s federal budget was due to be spent over the next four years, and spending will not peak until 2024. However, the government is ­reluctant to threaten its projected surplus.

Over the forward estimates, the Morrison government is expected to spend $42.8bn on a number of federal and joint federal-state projects, including the Melbourne Airport Rail Link, the Western Sydney North-South Rail and the Queensland M1 upgrade.

Mr McCormack, who oversees the infrastructure ministry, said the audit failed to take into ­account $23bn worth of infrastructure spending announced in this year’s federal budget and noted the government was funding 19 items on the agency’s priority list.

Click here to see PDF
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #183 on: August 13, 2019, 05:17:40 AM »
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #184 on: August 13, 2019, 08:23:12 AM »

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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #185 on: August 13, 2019, 12:54:40 PM »
https://www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/publications/australian-infrastructure-audit-2019

Australian Infrastructure Audit 2019

An Assessment of Australia’s Future Infrastructure Needs

Downloads

Australian Infrastructure Audit 2019 - Executive Summary (PDF: 11.44 MB)
 
Australian Infrastructure Audit 2019 - Full document (PDF: 55.82 MB)

Australian Infrastructure Audit 2019 - Media release (WORD: 71.13 KB) 
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #186 on: August 13, 2019, 12:59:34 PM »
Chair's newsletter

Tuesday 13 August 2019   
 
Today, I am proud to share that Infrastructure Australia has publicly launched the 2019 Australian Infrastructure Audit.

The 2019 Audit presents a forward-looking view of Australia’s infrastructure challenges and opportunities over the next 15 years and beyond.

The Audit is a wide-ranging document, totalling 640 pages, with 180 identified Challenges and Opportunities, 350 infographics and more than 2,500 references. It includes the work of over 150 contributors and the views of a further 5000 people who were surveyed as part of our community research.

The document is the culmination of more than 12 months of work. It could not have been accomplished without the expertise and assistance of the many people who engaged meaningfully with us during the drafting process.

I extend my thanks to all our valuable contributors for their impact in shaping this important document.

A different approach

The 2019 Australian Infrastructure Audit is the second of its kind, following our inaugural Audit in 2015. This Audit does a few things differently.

The document examines Australia’s infrastructure needs from the perspective of the user. It focuses on the accessibility, quality and affordability of infrastructure for all Australians and covers the major infrastructure sectors of energy, transport, telecommunications, water – and for the first time – social infrastructure.

Rather than focus on conventional state and territory boundaries, we have framed infrastructure needs by the type of places they serve. The Audit identifies the geographic impact of each challenge and opportunity using four new categories:

Fast growing cities,

Smaller cities and regional centres,

Smaller towns, regional communities and remote areas, and

Developing regions and northern Australia.

Our analysis is supported by a range of new supporting technical reports, including:

Transport network modelling for the nation’s six largest urban conurbations

A survey of 5000 Australians regarding their perceptions of Infrastructure

Analysis of the cost of infrastructure expressed as a proportion of average household incomes across Australia.
 

What’s next for Infrastructure Australia

The Audit is the first step in our policy process to identify nationally significant reform and investment priorities to meet Australia’s long term infrastructure needs.

The breadth of issues identified in the document will inform the the approach and recommendations of the next Australian Infrastructure Plan, as well as our ongoing work in updating the Infrstructure Priority List, an annual pipeline of nationally significant investment opportunities.

We are inviting public submissions in response to the Audit, and warmly encourage you to share your feedback as we begin work on the Australian Infrastructure Plan, due for release in 2021.

It’s critical that we receive a diversity of views, as it will help us to identify the right infrastructure solutions to support Australia’s growth and development over the next 15 years and beyond.

We look forward to receiving your feedback in the coming months.

Kind regards,

Julieanne Alroe

Chair, Infrastructure Australia
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #187 on: August 13, 2019, 03:14:56 PM »
Rail Express --> Infrastructure Australia joins push for more mega projects

Quote
Infrastructure Australia says governments need to spend $600 billion on infrastructure, with a particular focus on high capacity public transport, over the next 15 years, to avoid a significant increase in congestion.

The federal government’s independent infrastructure adviser on August 13 released its first audit of Australia’s infrastructure since 2015, and joined calls from the Reserve Bank and the Opposition for the Coalition to accelerate infrastructure project timelines around the country.

“Rather than a short-term boom, the historic level of activity we are seeing in the sector must, and is likely, to continue for the next 15 years and potentially beyond,” Infrastructure Australia chair Julieanne Alroe said.

“This must be the new normal if we are to meet the challenges and opportunities ahead.

Infrastructure Australia’s 2019 Australian Infrastructure Audit, like the first audit performed in 2015, aims to examine the energy, transport, telecommunications and water infrastructure needs of the Australian community and industry.

Like its predecessor, the 2019 audit called for more public transport funding from governments to avoid congestion, particularly in the outer suburbs of Australia’s four largest cities – Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth – as the nation’s population soars 24 per cent to 31.4 million by 2034.

“Infrastructure in our four largest cities … is failing to keep pace with rapid population growth, particularly on the urban fringe,” Alroe said.

“The dominance of infill development in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane will require investment in high capacity public transport, enhancements to existing energy and water infrastructure, improved shared spaces and a renewal of inner city health and education services.”

The audit estimates the cost of road congestion will grow by $18.9 billion to $38.7 billion in 2031, if enough is not done to address this issue.

“This impacts quality of life, as well as our economic productivity and competitiveness as a nation,” Alroe said.
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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #188 on: August 14, 2019, 06:12:47 PM »
https://ara.net.au/content/ia-audit-shows-congestion-will-continue
Australasian Railway Association (ARA)
Media release

IA Audit Shows Congestion Will Continue

2019 August 13

ARA CEO Danny Broad welcomed todays Infrastructure Australia Audit 2019.
 
“The audit provides a frank, evidence based assessment of the key challenges facing Australia in meeting future infrastructure needs. It is complex and multi-faceted,” he said.
 
“The most considered and challenging finding is that the record investment being made in infrastructure by state, territory and the Commonwealth Governments is not a once in a generation aberration, but is in fact the ‘new normal.’
 
“Governments will be required to continue to build more infrastructure needed to keep pace with Australia’s growing population, and more complex and varied needs.”
 
“The audit finds urban congestion will continue to grow with population unless investment continues to increase. “
 
“A key issue then becomes the ability and commitment of governments to sustain these levels of funding over the medium term.  ARA has estimated that over $150 B has been committed to rail projects alone over a 15 year period.”
 
“Many of the key themes identified in the Audit are already on the ARA public policy agenda.  This audit reinforces the need for Commonwealth and state governments to rise to the challenges, and put in place strategies to address these challenges over the long term,” he said.
 
Relevant findings of the audit include:

The cost of public transport congestion will grow from $175 million in 2016 to $837 million in 2031;

The cost of road congestion will grow from $18.9 billion in 2016 to $38.8 billion in 2031;

There is a need for increasing investment in passenger rail networks. Access to and quality of passenger transport networks is unequal and more difficult to access for financially stressed, people with a disability, people who are older, and those who live in regional and remote communities or the outer suburbs of major cities;

Australia’s freight task is growing rapidly. Congestion on key urban freight routes, inconsistent regulation and bottlenecks continue to hinder freight efficiency.  As cities grow and demands for living space increase, governments must find ways to successfully integrate freight needs into their urban planning;

There is no clear link between expenditure on roads and usage, which means road expenditure is inequitable, inefficient, unsustainable and lacks transparency. Without reform, revenue from fuel excise will decline, drivers will not be charged fairly and people will be incentivised to drive, contributing to congestion.

ARA commends the breadth of the report and commits to making a submission to inform the next Australian Infrastructure Plan.
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #189 on: August 14, 2019, 06:47:49 PM »
I saw the figure of $600 billion over the next 15 years mentioned by the guardian.

In an age where wages are not growing, levying higher taxes on the people is just not going to cut it.

The trouble with IA is they are an agency for concrete. Got a problem? Pour concrete on it.

What about road user charges? Density at stations rather than $60k car parks, and connected bus networks? Much cheaper, and will help!
Negative people... have a problem for every solution.
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Offline techblitz

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #190 on: August 14, 2019, 09:29:49 PM »
Even if they manage to find every single dollar needed for the infrastructure....money for services will be needed too... two horse race instead of 1.....both jostling for much needed funds...

Just save a lot of hassle...curb the rate of population growth..
http://www.sociologydiscussion.com/demography/population-growth/12-main-consequences-of-population-growth/3162

Slow it down to at least NZ/Canada...inch it downwards to 1%.... so we can start making leeway.....but if we did add 450k last year as reported....that is 1.7% which means the other direction..

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/anthony-albanese-calls-for-mature-debate-on-population-growth/ar-AAFKLwd?ocid=spartanntp

Thankfully the lesser of two weevils albo is coming to the table....all going well that means both the coalition & labor will distance themselves from krudds signature big Australia policy......albanese has only changed his tune because he has seen the crush loading && dwindling green space first hand.....fuelled by greed and incompetence...

Offline #Metro

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #191 on: August 14, 2019, 10:22:02 PM »

It is $2000 per year per person for 15 years to raise $600 BN.

And that's just for the infrastructure construction. We have not even got to operational costs.

A lot of the transport money pot is being spread far too thinly, trying to connect places that are ~ 50 km away which have no infrastructure connection (e.g. Yarrabilba) or spent on high-cost low patronage things like $60K car parks.

A lot of this is coming down to density aversion - not wanting people living next to "my" house. This is the motivation for BCC trying to ban townhouses and duplexes in urban areas.

On top of all of this you have a huge ageing population, which will see an enormous cost explosion in healthcare... I just can't see it happening with that kind of money.
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #192 on: September 10, 2019, 01:23:12 AM »
Highway, rail among four Queensland projects to get green light


Brisbanetimes------>https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/politics/queensland/highway-rail-among-four-queensland-projects-to-get-green-light-20190909-p52ph8.html


Quote
Highway, rail among four Queensland projects to get green light

FELICITY CALDWELL SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

Gold Coast light rail stage 3A will link Broadbeach South to Burleigh Heads. Credit:Glenn Hunt

"With 88 per cent of trips currently by private vehicle and less than 5 per cent by public transport, urban congestion is a major challenge and this is expected to worsen as the Gold Coast's population grows by an estimated 55 per cent to 928,000 people by 2041."

The Queensland government estimated the cost of congestion between Broadbeach and Burleigh Heads was $38 million last year, which would increase to $145 million by 2041.

However, Ms Madew said the total benefits of stage 3A were close to its total costs.

"We identified two key factors that are critical to delivering value for money: land use changes to promote urban renewal and increase density in surrounding areas, and encouraging more residents to leave the car at home and use the light rail instead."

Ms Madew said the Queensland government and Gold Coast City Council would need to take proactive steps to encourage people to use the next stage of light rail, which ran through a less densely populated area.

Travel times on light rail will be similar to existing bus services, even though light rail should be more reliable and comfortable for passengers, Infrastructure Australia said.

The service will operate every 7.5 minutes on weekdays between 7am and 7pm, and every 10 minutes on weekends.

The addition of Gold Coast light rail stage 3A to the priority list comes after a funding stoush between the state and federal governments.

Last month, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced a $351 million commitment to Gold Coast light rail stage 3A, which would extend the G:link by almost seven kilometres and include eight new stations.

Ms Palaszczuk said the Queensland government's contribution was about half the $709 million total cost and called on the federal government to to pledge $269 million.

"Currently, the $112 million (or 16 per cent) the federal government has committed falls well short of a fair funding agreement and is just not good enough for the people of Gold Coast," she said in August.

But LNP leader Deb Frecklington accused the Premier of "playing politics" and leaving a $150 million shortfall.

Gold Coast light rail stage 3A is due to be completed by 2023.

Three Bruce Highway projects were also added to Infrastructure Australia's priority list: Cooroy to Curra section D: Woondum to Curra; Deception Bay Road interchange upgrade; and Maroochydore Road interchange project.

Ms Madew said the Deception Bay Road interchange upgrade was a key connection for people driving from Moreton Bay and surrounding regional areas, and would also cater for freight travelling to Brisbane.

"However, safety on the interchange is a key challenge, with 255 crashes occurring at this interchange or on connector roads in the decade to 2017," she said.

The business case argued the project would increase evening peak speeds from 23km/h to 50km/h by 2031.


Infrastructure Australia List-----> https://www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/search-priority-list-map
« Last Edit: September 10, 2019, 01:29:26 AM by verbatim9 »

Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #193 on: September 10, 2019, 08:42:31 AM »
https://twitter.com/InfraAust/status/1171191270355550209
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #194 on: December 05, 2019, 01:42:40 AM »
https://twitter.com/ozbob13/status/1202251702008573957
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #195 on: December 05, 2019, 01:44:10 AM »
^ this the former LM that thought trams in the Brisbane River ( " Cleveland solution " ) and a rubber tyred metro with less capacity than the busway they were designed to replace were both good solid ideas.

 :fp:
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Offline ozbob

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #196 on: February 26, 2020, 08:27:14 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Faster journeys on Sydney-Canberra trains among 'priorities'

Quote
Slow trips for passengers travelling on the ageing rail line between Sydney and Canberra have been singled out by the country's top infrastructure adviser, which favours an upgrade to tracks and railway signalling to enable faster services.

Infrastructure Australia has put the rail corridor and several highway upgrades, including a 33-kilometre stretch of the Great Western Highway in the Blue Mountains, on its latest list of priority projects it wants state and federal governments to target.

It comes ahead of the expected release in the coming months of a report by British rail expert Andrew McNaughton on potential high-speed rail routes in NSW. The Sydney-Canberra route was one of four he canvassed for his report, which was completed at the end of last year.

Infrastructure Australia said the 320-kilometre line from Sydney to Canberra was "constrained by terrain, ageing infrastructure and track sharing with freight movements", leading to long journey times.

It takes about four hours to travel by train between Sydney and Canberra, compared with three hours by car. As a result, just 1 per cent of people travelling between the two cities use trains.

"Improving rail services in this corridor would provide more transport options for travellers, improve travel-time reliability for rail passengers and reduce pressure on the air corridor," Infrastructure Australia said.

It said potential upgrades could include track straightening and duplication, electrification of the line, signalling improvements and new trains.

The potential role of high speed rail should also be considered, it said.

ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr said both his government and its NSW counterpart believed improving the line was a priority, and he was encouraged that Infrastructure Australia had recognised the need for faster trains.

"This isn’t about ‘high speed’ or ‘very fast’ rail – it’s about improving the existing corridor, reducing travel times and making rail more competitive than driving or flying," he said.

NSW Regional Transport and Roads Minister Paul Toole said the government was "taking the time to get" right the vision for a fast rail network, and would update the public as "soon as we have more to say".

"This network has the potential to reduce travel times by 75 per cent," he said.

Infrastructure Australia also identified as "priority initiatives" an upgrade to the Great Western Highway between Katoomba and Lithgow, and improvements to the Princes Highway from Nowra on the South Coast to the Victorian border.

The Great Western Highway passes through towns such as Blackheath, which led to "congestion, safety risks from heavy vehicles ... and additional travel costs for freight".

Mr Toole said the government was investing $2.5 billion towards upgrading the Great Western Highway, and a similar amount for the Princes Highway.
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #197 on: February 26, 2020, 03:47:08 PM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Faster journeys on Sydney-Canberra trains among 'priorities'

Quote
Slow trips for passengers travelling on the ageing rail line between Sydney and Canberra have been singled out by the country's top infrastructure adviser, which favours an upgrade to tracks and railway signalling to enable faster services.

Infrastructure Australia has put the rail corridor and several highway upgrades, including a 33-kilometre stretch of the Great Western Highway in the Blue Mountains, on its latest list of priority projects it wants state and federal governments to target.

It comes ahead of the expected release in the coming months of a report by British rail expert Andrew McNaughton on potential high-speed rail routes in NSW. The Sydney-Canberra route was one of four he canvassed for his report, which was completed at the end of last year.

Infrastructure Australia said the 320-kilometre line from Sydney to Canberra was "constrained by terrain, ageing infrastructure and track sharing with freight movements", leading to long journey times.

It takes about four hours to travel by train between Sydney and Canberra, compared with three hours by car. As a result, just 1 per cent of people travelling between the two cities use trains.

"Improving rail services in this corridor would provide more transport options for travellers, improve travel-time reliability for rail passengers and reduce pressure on the air corridor," Infrastructure Australia said.

It said potential upgrades could include track straightening and duplication, electrification of the line, signalling improvements and new trains.

The potential role of high speed rail should also be considered, it said.

ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr said both his government and its NSW counterpart believed improving the line was a priority, and he was encouraged that Infrastructure Australia had recognised the need for faster trains.

"This isn’t about ‘high speed’ or ‘very fast’ rail – it’s about improving the existing corridor, reducing travel times and making rail more competitive than driving or flying," he said.

NSW Regional Transport and Roads Minister Paul Toole said the government was "taking the time to get" right the vision for a fast rail network, and would update the public as "soon as we have more to say".

"This network has the potential to reduce travel times by 75 per cent," he said.

Infrastructure Australia also identified as "priority initiatives" an upgrade to the Great Western Highway between Katoomba and Lithgow, and improvements to the Princes Highway from Nowra on the South Coast to the Victorian border.

The Great Western Highway passes through towns such as Blackheath, which led to "congestion, safety risks from heavy vehicles ... and additional travel costs for freight".

Mr Toole said the government was investing $2.5 billion towards upgrading the Great Western Highway, and a similar amount for the Princes Highway.
^^This line will do well as a electrified commuter line.

Offline verbatim9

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Re: Australia Infrastructure including IA discussion
« Reply #198 on: February 26, 2020, 07:11:28 PM »
You can access the full Priority List on our website  https://t.co/WbnApT455S

https://twitter.com/InfraAust/status/1232434886905974785


 

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