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Author Topic: Rail in the USA, Canada  (Read 20432 times)

Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #80 on: February 05, 2018, 02:15:45 AM »
Couriermail --> Multiple dead and many injured after passenger train collides with freight train in South Carolina

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AT least two people were killed and 70 more were injured overnight when a train carrying 147 people collided with a freight train in the eastern US state of South Carolina, local police said.

The Amtrak train travelling between New York and Miami collided with the CSX freight train and derailed in Cayce, near Columbia, the state’s capital, at around 2.30am (6.30pm AEDT) on Sunday.

Amtrak said in a statement that the lead engine derailed along with some passenger cars. Eight crew members and 139 passengers were on board.

The Lexington County Sheriff’s Department confirmed all passengers had been evacuated from the Amtrak train. Officials added that although 20,000 litres of fuel spilt following the crash, there was no danger to the public.

Speaking to CNN, passenger Derek Pettaway said he was travelling south from Philadelphia to Orlando in a sleeper cabin when he was woken by the impact of the crash.

He added Amtrak staff evacuated passengers in a “really calm fashion.” It is not known how many people were travelling on the freight train, or whether one of the two trains was stationary at the time of the collision.

The Red Cross said it was responding and providing support to victims. The accident comes days after another Amtrak train carrying several dozen Republican politicians including US House Speaker Paul Ryan collided with a garbage truck in Virginia, killing one person and causing six others, including a congressman, to need hospital treatment.

In December, three people were killed when an Amtrak passenger train derailed in Washington state near the city of Tacoma, sending cars flying off a bridge and onto a busy interstate road.
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #81 on: May 01, 2018, 12:52:41 PM »
Grants of 2.6 Billion USD released to improve and electrify California's Rail network.

https://www.progressiverailroading.com/passenger_rail/news/California-distributes-26-billion-for-rail-transit-work--54536

Chosen electric rail stock as pictured

Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #82 on: May 14, 2018, 05:52:42 PM »
" San Francisco has the greatest variety of transit in the United States! Woah!
Trolleybuses, buses, cable cars, streetcars, subways, and light rail!!! "



 :o
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #83 on: May 14, 2018, 07:53:30 PM »
Their trolley buses are great I have been on a couple while I was there a while back to get around. So quiet inside. Roomy too as electric engines don't take up much space in the chassis when compared combustion engines. Perfect!
" San Francisco has the greatest variety of transit in the United States! Woah!
Trolleybuses, buses, cable cars, streetcars, subways, and light rail!!! "



 :o

Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #84 on: May 26, 2018, 04:06:04 PM »
Time Out New York --> In sweeping plan to fix the subway, MTA cuts 24-hour service



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New York City Transit president Andy Byford released his highly anticipated plan on Wednesday, which outlined a medley of initiatives to rapidly modernize the city's transit system. Titled “Fast Forward,” it proposes sweeping changes to the city’s bus system, handicap accessibility and management structure. But the real crux of it, of course, is to fix the subway.

The biggest piece of the plan involves an aggressive approach to upgrading the subway’s signaling system, much of which is more than 50 years old and is considered the single biggest cause of delays and slow service. Currently, the L is the only line that has been fitted entirely with communications-based train control (CBTC), a signal system that allows trains to run faster and closer together and is less prone to malfunctions than the old infrastructure. The MTA is behind schedule and over budget on rolling out the technology on the 7 line, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2018. Those two lines cover just 900,000 of the subway’s 5.7 million daily riders, and previous estimates have said that it will take another 40 years to get CBTC rolled out across the system.

Byford aims to change that.

In the first five years of the plan, the MTA aims to upgrade five different lines with the new technology, including the busy Lexington Avenue Line, which carries the 4, 5 and 6 trains, and the Eighth Avenue Line, which carries the A, C and E. The entirety of the G, chunks of the E, F, M and R in Queens, and the F in South Brooklyn will also see upgrades. Those lines would bring the number of straphangers taking lines equipped with CBTC to 3 million—the plan aims to bring that number to 5 million within 10 years.

In slashing the time it will take to overhaul the signals by 30 years, service will inevitably have to be cut during construction. The MTA does not have a clear idea of what those cuts will look like, but the plan does say that there will be continuous night and weekend closures for up to two-and-a-half years on each line that is being upgraded. Byford says that weekday service will be maintained during the CBTC implementation and additional bus service will be provided where necessary during outages, but the general gist is that subway service is going to get even worse before it gets better.

This temporary elimination of 24-hour service on some lines will surely be a hard pill to swallow for many New Yorkers, but it’s not something that should come as a shock. In November, the president of the Regional Plan Association said that “the era of the 24/7 subway system in New York City has come to an end” during a presentation of the local think tank’s 61-point Fourth Regional Plan.

What’s sure to be even more controversial than the service cuts is the actual cost of the plan—MTA chairman Joe Lhota was mum about its price tag.

“All estimates are premature and inevitably not accurate,” he said at Wednesday’s MTA Board meeting. “The point of today’s presentation is not about numbers, but it’s to show that we can and we will modernize the New York City subway system.”

Still, sources leaked estimates to both The New York Times and the Post on Tuesday night, projecting the total cost at $19 billion on the low end and all the way up to $37 billion on the high end. If those numbers are even remotely accurate, it presents a massive challenge for transit advocates and politicians alike. The funding would have to be approved in Albany and signed off on by Governor Andrew Cuomo, who controls the MTA. Considering that the $880 million price tag on last year’s Subway Action Plan led to months of quibbling between Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio, one shouldn't expect that Byford’s plan will have an easy approval process.

Even so, MTA Board members hailed the plan and were optimistic that it would garner funding and support.

“While the cost of these initiatives over the long term is being formulated, I think it’s important for us whenever this number does come out to not be affected by sticker shock,” MTA Board member Veronica Vanterpool said during Wednesday’s meeting.

“At the end of the day, what it’s really going to come down to is how much the citizens of the state of New York are going to be willing to pay to have a world-class transit system,’ added Peter Ward, another member of the board.

Byford is no stranger to this kind of political vitriol surrounding massive transit projects. A veteran of the London Underground, Sydney’s transit system and the Toronto Transit System, he says he's up for the fight.

“I was used to a tough political environment in Toronto,” he said on Wednesday. “I like the fact that transit is a hot potato. If people were passive about transit it would suggest to me that they didn’t really care about it, but it's good that there's this very active debate.”
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Offline Lungfish

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #85 on: July 03, 2018, 09:50:17 PM »
An interesting read on Andy Byford and his challenges with the New York MTA.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/07/09/can-andy-byford-save-the-subways

Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #86 on: July 27, 2018, 05:07:17 PM »
https://twitter.com/Rainmaker1973/status/1022408774492020736
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Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #87 on: October 21, 2018, 04:21:17 PM »
https://twitter.com/airplusnews/status/1053370404201476102
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Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #88 on: November 02, 2018, 04:20:19 PM »
CBC --> Churchill residents rejoice as rail service gets back on track


Hudson Bay Railway locomotives travelled the repaired track to Churchill Wednesday night, for the first time in nearly a year and a half. (Cameron MacIntosh/CBC )

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1st rail cars in over a year arrived in northern community Wednesday night

Residents of Churchill have taken to the streets to celebrate after the federal government announced full passenger and freight rail service should be restored to the northern Manitoba community by the end of the month.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the announcement at the Port of Churchill this morning, as hundreds of residents gathered for a street party to celebrate the arrival last night of the first train into Churchill in 18 months.

"Churchill, as Canada's only Arctic deep water port, is something I'm very optimistic about," Trudeau said.

"Supporting the North is of fundamental importance to the future of Canada."
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Offline SurfRail

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #89 on: May 19, 2019, 06:00:41 PM »
First full day of wandering around Vancouver. 

Funnily enough, of all the cities I could draw a comparison with, parts of KL are pretty close - elevated automatic trains and stations, random towers in the skyline surrounded by green etc.   

I don't think there is any way any part of SEQ will ever have a mass transit system as good as Vancouver's.  It is simply not possible.  Even their ticketing system works better from the fare structure to the fare gates (which are exactly the bloody same as ours).  Queensland is a joke perpetrated on its own residents.
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #90 on: July 02, 2020, 08:09:01 PM »
CalTrain Electrification

« Last Edit: July 03, 2020, 01:09:38 AM by ozbob »

 

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“You can't understand a city without using its public transportation system.” -- Erol Ozan