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Author Topic: Rail in the USA, Canada  (Read 11521 times)

Online ozbob

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Rail in the USA, Canada
« on: February 26, 2011, 06:28:15 AM »
Chron - Houston and Texas News --> Thanks to Utah, Metro will get rail cars in 2012  Piggy-backing on Salt Lake deal benefits agency
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 06:34:05 AM by ozbob »
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2011, 12:44:38 PM »
The Gazette --> Will Iowa get its own Zephyr?
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Offline Stillwater

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2011, 02:36:33 PM »
The story discloses an interesting fact ... Amtrac requires communities on its subsidised services (subsidised by the state) to purchase and maintain (and staff, if necessary) their local railway station.

Offline Fares_Fair

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2011, 02:38:19 PM »
.. pulling out the paint brushes, brooms, hoses and litter picker-upperers
(with extension handles for reaching between the tracks).

Regards,
Fares_Fair.
Regards,
Fares_Fair


Offline O_128

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2011, 02:42:32 PM »
.. pulling out the paint brushes, brooms, hoses and litter picker-upperers
(with extension handles for reaching between the tracks).

Regards,
Fares_Fair.

Itd be a good idea to hand over railway stations to the local communities for maintanence etc, let them do what they want with them for example build shops.
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2011, 03:20:37 PM »
Not quite the same thing, but ...

http://www.transadelaide.com.au/AM/adopt_station.htm

Offline Stillwater

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2011, 11:20:27 PM »
Actually, I think that would work on some stations in SEQ.

Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2011, 03:35:35 AM »
--> http://www.greatamericanstations.com/

Revitalizing America's Train Stations
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2011, 04:29:53 AM »
USA Today --> Amtrak, 15 states get Florida's $2B in high-speed rail money
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2011, 04:32:25 AM »
US Department of Transportation --> Latest awards bring US closer to national high-speed passenger rail network
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2011, 04:33:02 AM »
New York Times Editorial http://mobile.nytimes.com/article?a=786917&f=28&p=0

The Rejected Windfall by Florida

Quote
EDITORIAL
The Rejected Windfall by Florida
Published: May 10, 2011

After Gov. Rick Scott of Florida thoughtlessly rejected $2.4 billion in federal aid for a high-speed rail line, he claimed last month that he was doing a huge favor for the national Treasury, which he expected would give away the money in tax cuts. That was nonsense, of course; Mr. Scott was really doing a favor for train passengers in the Northeast, Midwest and California, which were given $2 billion of his money on Monday for better service. Florida voters might want to think about that decision as they sit in traffic jams, burning up $4-a-gallon gasoline. In fact, some of them clearly have thought about it because Mr. Scott now has some of the worst approval ratings of a Florida official in the last decade. He has joined other newly elected Republican governors so rigidly opposed to the Obama administration that they are willing to harm their states to score points. The result is a crazy quilt of state relationships with Washington, stitched more with ideology than reason.None of the money in Monday's announcement will be going to Wisconsin, for example, where Gov. Scott Walker has also decided that his strapped state could do without rail improvements and the construction jobs that go with them. Nor will it go to Ohio, where Gov. John Kasich preferred rejectionism to the improvement of rail service among the state's largest cities, which could have produced 16,000 jobs.Instead, it will go to 15 states that have more farsighted leadership, who understand the important role federal dollars can play in stimulating the economy, moving people quickly from place to place and reducing tailpipe emissions. Some of those states are led by Republicans: Gov. Rick Snyder of Michigan happily stood beside Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood on Monday to accept nearly $200 million to upgrade the rail line between Dearborn and Kalamazoo, the bulk of the Chicago-Detroit corridor.


The difference between states that want better infrastructure and those that do not is likely to grow in coming years. Some states will accept federal aid and tax themselves to pay for better trains, upgraded roads and bridges, and effective water systems. Others will not.In the Northeast, several Amtrak corridors will be upgraded, including a sliver of the Acela line and the Empire line through upstate New York. The Chicago-St. Louis corridor will be improved, and $300 million will be invested in the high-speed project between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Texas is accepting $15 million to start work on a fast line between Dallas and Houston. Transportation is not all that is at stake. Last year, Utah Republican lawmakers tried to refuse $101 million in federal money intended to save teachers' jobs; they backed down when it was clear that Washington could send the money directly to school districts. Oklahoma and other states have rejected federal dollars connected to health care reform. Earlier this year, Missouri nearly rejected extended jobless benefits for 10,000 residents after a handful of Republicans said the money was wasteful.Refusenik Republicans glorify shopworn principles like smaller government and states' rights. They will have to defend them to their voters when the public hears the passenger trains whistling from the next state over
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Offline Zoiks

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2011, 10:53:25 AM »
Im glad we have not gotten to this point yet in Australia

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2011, 05:55:54 AM »
From toledoblade.com click here!

Michigan: All aboard

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Michigan: All aboard

Michigan has made its share of transportation blunders in recent years. Last week, something went very right. U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood came to Detroit and gave the state a $196.5 million check to improve rail service between Detroit and Chicago. “High-speed rail is coming to America,” Mr. LaHood said, “and nothing can stand in the way of it.”

Sadly, that isn’t quite true. Dithering politicians and people with ideological blinders on have worked to block this good idea. Michigan’s money became available because Florida’s Republican governor rejected $2.4 billion in high-speed rail funds.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich also has been shortsighted. He turned down $400 million in rail aid that advocates say would have created 16,000 jobs and generated investment of $3 billion in the state.

Mr. LaHood and Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder are, like Mr. Kasich, Republicans. But they see the bigger picture. The rail aid to Michigan will help shave time off the trip between Detroit and Chicago.

The current condition of the track is a big problem; trains can’t go more than 40 miles per hour much of the way. The federal aid will help Amtrak acquire a stretch of aging track from Norfolk Southern and renovate it.

In three years, speeds of as much as 110 mph should be possible. “When this work is complete, Chicago-Detroit will be a four-hour trip,” said former U.S. Rep. Joe Schwarz, a longtime railroad buff who pushed to make the grant happen.

Amtrak says ridership on the Detroit-Chicago route is up 16 percent over last year. Given the rising price of gasoline and growing inconvenience of air travel, train use should climb even more.

Michigan is getting more than money for the Chicago-Detroit line. The state scored $2.8 million for a new high-speed rail station in Ann Arbor. There is aid to build new locomotives and trains — it’s hoped in Michigan and Ohio factories.

“It’s about economic development, but it’s also environmentally sound and it’s about great quality of life,” Governor Snyder proclaimed in accepting the rail money. There’s a lesson in those words for his counterpart in Ohio.
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Offline johnnigh

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2011, 08:56:30 PM »
Now it's New York's subway system that has lost its CEO to a progressive system.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/01/opinion/gov-cuomos-subway-system.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=tha211

Quote
Gov. Cuomo’s Subway System
Published: July 31, 2011
For two years, Jay Walder, an internationally known transportation expert, has been running the antiquated New York City mass-transit system with quiet efficiency. He has limited the failures dramatically, started new countdown clocks in subways and cut costs — $500 million last year, more than $600 million in 2011.
Now, after serving only two years of his six-year contract, Mr. Walder is deserting New York City for the sleek new system in Hong Kong. And that means someone has to take ownership of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the largest public system in the country.

You can be forgiven if you think the official with ultimate responsibility is Mayor Michael Bloomberg, but it is actually Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The governor, who, incidentally, commutes from Westchester to Albany by car or plane, doesn’t talk much about the system. Now he has to take charge. He can start by hiring — and supporting — the best, independent-minded transit professional to do the crucial, if often thankless, job of running the authority.

Persuading a noted expert to take on the burden will not be easy. Besides the noticeable problems — from dirty subway corridors to century-old tracks and tunnels — there is a general failure in New York and Washington to recognize the importance of public transit. Albany’s bailout for the authority in 2009 provided short-term stability, but a five-year, $24 billion capital plan is fast going broke.

To keep the operating budget balanced and to deal with a $9 billion gap in the capital plan over the next three years, the authority plans to borrow heavily. The Walder plan depends on $2.2 billion in federal loans and $4.7 billion from other sources, bringing the authority’s total debt to more than $36 billion. Operating funds now being used for capital expenses would be used to service the debt.

This borrowing would save the Second Avenue subway in Manhattan, the link between the Long Island Rail Road and Grand Central Terminal and $18 billion in work on tracks, stations and other basics. But what happens in later years, when the cost of this debt rises?

A better solution would be more financial support from the city, the state, as well as car drivers and businesses that benefit from the system. Another fare increase should be a last resort.

The $12 billion operating budget proposed for 2012 makes risky assumptions: More than 60 unions will have to agree to pay freezes; fares will automatically go up 7.5 percent in 2013 and in 2015; Albany would keep the authority payroll tax that suburban legislators bitterly oppose.

Mr. Cuomo’s choice to manage the system will tell a lot about how he governs. Until recently, governors picked loyalists or political favorites. Mr. Cuomo’s choice should have the strongest possible résumé and a clear mission: to provide the best service for 8.5 million commuters.

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2011, 03:36:40 PM »
From the Washington Post click here!

To put America’s travel leadership on track, focus on rail

Quote
To put America’s travel leadership on track, focus on rail

By ROBERT THOMSON, Published: August 4

Dear Dr. Gridlock:

The car might be king today, but as crude oil supplies diminish and gas eventually hits $10 a gallon, trains are going to look mighty attractive. Kudos to Jim Churchill of Alexandria for laying out a six-point plan for revitalizing the region’s railroads [Dr. Gridlock, July 14].

There is an old aphorism that one should not put forth a stinting plan, but rather a scheme bold enough to command attention and inspiration. Churchill’s plan does this by postulating a mix of light-rail commuter and intercity high-speed rail routes.

Contrast his vision with the government’s now-dead concept for 85 miles of high-speed rail in Florida. If the government had postulated building 850 miles of high-speed rail in the Northeast corridor, the wisdom of the vision would have been more evident, and funding would have followed.

As someone who has written about airline travel and aviation safety for more than 10 years, and who has traveled on Japan’s regional railways and its high-speed Shinkansen (bullet) trains, I have seen what freedom from cars and trains is like and what trains represent in the way of a pleasant and economical means of getting around.

Churchill’s plan is the minimum necessary to reduce our reliance on road transportation and the resulting gridlock. Ending the national love affair with suburbia, strip malls, edge cities and other such examples of bad architecture, bad planning and counterproductive zoning would mark a huge blow for common sense.

Not to mention our growing dependence on foreign petroleum, an enormously counterproductive habit from an economic, foreign-policy and industrial-base standpoint.

Our addiction to cars and trucks will be increasingly expensive. Within 10 years, domestic airline travel will shrink by one-third, and the cost per ticket will rise 50 percent. Routine trips by air will be for the privileged few. The interstate trucking industry will be dead, killed by high fuel prices.

Trains will take over interstate cargo hauling, and trucks will be used primarily for intrastate and local deliveries. Cars will become an increasingly expensive luxury.

All to the good, I believe. The traffic in the Washington region is obscenely congested. Tokyo, Paris, London and their radiating superhighways are similarly clogged. London’s recent effort to limit car traffic in the central city has made it a more livable place.

How to pay for rail transport? For petroleum, we send billions of dollars each month to feudal monarchies, antidemocratic autocracies and otherwise incompetent regimes. Redirect that river of dollars to alternative domestic transportation needs.

Our oil addition has led to some counterproductive effects: money flowing offshore; dependence increasing; a huge military presence in the gulf; an aggravation of global warming; urban sprawl; and technological stasis.

Churchill’s rail plan is vital and necessary to get America on track, so to speak. Our country should be a leader in railroad technology. Sadly, we’re not. I run out of fingers listing the countries that surpass the United States in rail infrastructure, technology, speed, safety, personal comfort and convenience.


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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2011, 06:06:10 AM »
Fox Business --> Record Amtrak Passengers Hint at Growing Demand for High-Speed Rail
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #16 on: December 06, 2011, 08:03:19 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZN5tYIBvlA&sns=fb

Huh, what is the axle loading .. ?  LOL
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2012, 03:13:00 PM »
Transportation Nation --> New York’s Lost Subways
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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #18 on: April 06, 2012, 06:36:26 PM »
An interesting video, track laying in the USA on upgraded rail line Chicago to St. Louis

--> http://www.wimp.com/traintrack/
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Offline Golliwog

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2012, 12:13:40 AM »
An interesting video, track laying in the USA on upgraded rail line Chicago to St. Louis

--> http://www.wimp.com/traintrack/
Cool. Haven't seen one replacing the track like that. I have seen a similar one though but they were contructing the line from scratch installing track, sleepers, pads, clips and ballast.
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Offline SurfRail

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2012, 06:55:46 AM »
Would this be similar to the "pony express" method used by ARTC to replace the sleepers on the Brisbane-Sydney line?

(As opposed to the much less successful side insertion method used on the line from Albury to Melbourne...)
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Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2012, 10:16:49 AM »
From  the New York Times click here!

CHICAGO — When it comes to rail traffic, Chicago is America’s speed bump.

Quote
CHICAGO — When it comes to rail traffic, Chicago is America’s speed bump.

Shippers complain that a load of freight can make its way from Los Angeles to Chicago in 48 hours, then take 30 hours to travel across the city. A recent trainload of sulfur took some 27 hours to pass through Chicago — an average speed of 1.13 miles per hour, or about a quarter the pace of many electric wheelchairs.

With freight volume in the United States expected to grow by more than 80 percent in the next 20 years, delays are projected to only get worse.

The underlying reasons for this sprawling traffic jam are complex, involving history, economics and a nation’s disinclination to improve its roads, bridges and rails.

Six of the nation’s seven biggest railroads pass through the city, a testament to Chicago’s economic might when the rail lines were laid from the 1800s on. Today, a quarter of all rail traffic in the nation touches Chicago. Nearly half of what is known as intermodal rail traffic, the big steel boxes that can be carried aboard ships, trains or trucks, roll by or through this city.

The slowdown involves more than freight. The other day, William C. Thompson, a project manager for the Association of American Railroads, stood next to a crossroads of steel in the Englewood neighborhood pointing to a web of tracks used by freight trains and Amtrak passenger trains that intersected tracks for Metra, Chicago’s commuter rail. The commuter trains get to go first, he said, and so “Amtrak tells me they have more delays here than anywhere else in the system.”

More delays than anywhere else in the Chicago area? No, he said. “In the entire United States.”

Now, federal, state, local and industry officials are completing the early stages of a $3.2 billion project to untangle Chicago’s rail system — not just for its residents, who suffer commuter train delays and long waits in their cars at grade crossings, but for the rest of the nation as well.

The program, called Create (an acronym for Chicago Region Environmental and Transportation Efficiency Program), is intended to replace 25 rail intersections with overpasses and underpasses that will smooth the flow of traffic for the 1,300 freight and passenger trains that muscle through the city each day, and to separate tracks now shared by freight and passenger trains at critical spots. Fifty miles of new track will link yards and create a second east-west route across the city, building redundancy into the overburdened system.

Fourteen of the 70 projects have been completed so far, and 12 more are under way, including the $140 million “Englewood flyover,” or overpass.

While much of the country’s attention in transportation issues is focused on high-speed rail projects trumpeted by the Obama administration, Create is largely about bringing old-fashioned low-speed rail up to modern standards. Innovative financing combines federal, state and private money from various programs, including the federal stimulus packages. Create even uses some funds tied to high-speed rail, since many of the projects are being designed to accommodate those lines in the future.

One of the biggest holdups for freight traffic is that Chicago’s crowded rails must also get hundreds of thousands of commuters to work and home mornings and evenings, and so by an agreement known as the Chicago Protocol, the shared tracks and intersections belong to passenger rail during rush hours.

The progress of a few recent trains as measured by the railroads shows how the delays occur. Among them was a coal train traveling 1,100 miles east from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming.

The train reached Chicago in 60 hours; its average speed, with delays for traffic control and a delivery schedule on the first leg, was 18 miles per hour. Within the “corral” of the greater Chicago area, the average speed dropped to 3.9 miles per hour, the pace of a rapid walk. It took more than 10 hours to move the 40 miles across the city. It had to stop completely on the outskirts of town during commuter rush hours and wait its turn at “interlockings” — go-slow rail intersections like the one at Englewood. Once outside Chicago, the train’s average leapt to 36 miles per hour.

Some of the causes of delay might have seemed outdated in the 20th century, much less the 21st, like manual switches that engineers have to throw after their trains have passed. Create is replacing them with electronic switches and online traffic control networks, but until then engineers at some points have to get out of their cabins, walk the length of the train back to the switch — a mile or more — operate the switch, and then trudge back to their place at the head of the train before setting out again.

Chicago had lived with its rail anachronisms and idiosyncrasies for decades, but everything fell apart in a 1999 blizzard that paralyzed the city’s rails and backed up train traffic across the United States for months.

“The traffic just kept coming and coming and coming,” said David Grewe, a supervisor for Union Pacific Railroad. “We basically waited for the spring thaw.”

The resulting plan to fix its rail problems started with efforts to reduce delays by improving coordination among the six freight rail companies, an effort that includes Mr. Grewe, as well as Metra and Amtrak. “You would have thought that coordination would have taken place in the past,” Mr. Grewe said. “Unfortunately, it didn’t.”

Mr. Thompson, the rail association’s program manager for Create, said that building during a recession had produced a bonus, as construction companies eager to get the work have come in under budget on every project. “It’s a very good time to be building infrastructure,” he said.

With more than a dozen of the smaller projects in place, rail officials say they have already seen some reduction in delays, said Joe Shachter, director of public and intermodal transportation for the Illinois Department of Transportation, with bigger improvements to come. “The next two or three years in particular we think are going to show great advances,” he said.

But the full benefits will be felt only if all of the projects can be completed, Mr. Thompson said: a knot of interrelated problems requires a network of solutions.

And there lies a potentially larger problem than anything in the steel rails that snake across the city. While some of the financing for Create has come from private industry and state bonds, further progress depends almost entirely on the ability of Congress to pass transportation legislation. That legislation has historically been passed in a bipartisan manner. But Congress, eager to squeeze the budget and in continual disagreement about the nation’s priorities, has found itself repeatedly at an impasse over the current transportation bill.

To Brian Imus, staff director of Illinois PIRG, a consumer group, “it seems like as much gridlock as we’ve got with our trains, it’s even worse in Washington, D.C.” 
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Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA
« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2012, 06:33:08 AM »
THE GLOBE AND MAIL --> Rail makes big inroads in oil transport
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2012, 02:19:32 AM »
Daily News --> San Fernando Valley commuters flock to new Expo Line
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2012, 11:36:40 AM »
Interesting paper analysing the cost & operational effectiveness of the introduction of CBTC on the Muni Metro subway in San Francisco. click here.

(The US Department of Transport logo appears to be very similar to TransLink's logo!)

Online ozbob

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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2012, 06:45:57 AM »
The Australian --> Moving freight on track

Quote

THE grand old city of Chicago, 1300km west of New York at the foot of the Great Lakes, has been the heart of the US rail freight system for the past 150 years, and it remains so to this day.

While the US is home of the Kenworth and Mack prime- movers seen all over Australian roads, reform and investment in the past three decades have underpinned a rail renaissance in the country and reinforced its role as the mainstay of the national freight system ...
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2012, 10:13:53 AM »
Townhall com --> Illinois Amtrak train hits 111 mph in test run

Quote
... JOLIET, Ill. (AP) — For the first time on a key Midwestern route between Chicago and St. Louis, an Amtrak passenger train topped 110 mph Friday, ripping through fog-shrouded farm fields and blowing past cars on a parallel highway ...
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2012, 08:11:21 AM »
CoExist --> A Look Inside The Heroic Cleanup Effort In New York’s Subways
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2012, 11:22:59 AM »
Sad level crossing incident Texas.  Appears a truck may have got stuck on the crossing and impacted by a UP freighter ..

Fox News --> At least 4 dead after train crashes into trailer during Texas veterans parade

Quote
... It was not immediately clear what caused the accident, but one witness says the truck may have gotten stuck on the train tracks ...
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2013, 07:25:30 PM »
Steam Revenue Freight - On the Road to Paradise




Quote
Published on 14 Nov 2012

Penn Rail Videos is proud to present, our 300th YouTube video. We knew the footage featured in this video wasn't something that we could just post as a regular video. This footage is incomparable to anything else we have. This is steam pulling revenue freight trains, in the 21st Century. And it's happening on the "Road to Paradise", better known as the Strasburg Railroad. We have footage from three separate visits during 2012. For those not familiar, the Strasburg Railroad within recent years has gotten back into the freight business; transloading to be precise. For the most part, the freight would be handled by the line's SW8, #8618. However very rarely, one of the steam engines would be called upon to perform the said duty. For 2012, the Strasburg Railroad began to make steam-powered freights a scheduled activity ...
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #30 on: February 23, 2013, 03:24:59 AM »
Atlantic Cities --> See Machines Tear Up the Bowels of New York
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #31 on: March 07, 2013, 06:33:36 AM »
The Atlantic --> The Tunnels of NYC's East Side Access Project
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #32 on: May 13, 2013, 10:13:01 AM »
The San Francisco Chronicle --> Amtrak unveils locomotives to replace aging fleet
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #33 on: June 07, 2013, 08:16:29 AM »
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #34 on: July 08, 2013, 08:09:35 AM »
Brisbanetimes --> Death toll mounts as runaway freight train explodes in Quebec
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #35 on: October 08, 2013, 03:31:39 AM »
Atlantic Cities --> Watch Amtrak's Trains Move Along Their Routes in Real Time

Track a train --> http://blog.amtrak.com/2013/09/google-helps-track-a-train/
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2013, 11:06:51 AM »
Brisbanetimes --> Car collides with two trains in US
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2013, 11:43:30 AM »
Apparently Amtrak's total patronage is around 50% of QR's long distance patronage on a per capita basis.

Amtrak - About 36 million trips / about 300 million people

QR - About 1 million trips / about 4 million people
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #38 on: October 16, 2013, 11:59:11 AM »
Interesting thing about Amtrak is that has reversed the slide.  2012 was first pax improvement in 19 years and appears to be gaining a lot now.  They are starting to invest in track upgrades new trains etc. as well.  --> http://www.amtrak.com/servlet/ContentServer?c=Page&pagename=am%2FLayout&cid=1246041980246
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Re: Rail in the USA, Canada
« Reply #39 on: December 02, 2013, 09:37:00 AM »
ABC News --> NY train derailment: Four dead, dozens injured near Hudson River
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“You can't understand a city without using its public transportation system.” -- Erol Ozan