Queensland UTC +10
Terms of use Privacy About us Media Contact

Links

Author Topic: Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...  (Read 40769 times)

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« on: January 10, 2010, 03:52:41 AM »
From the Brisbanetimes click here!

More taxis on the road, but are we getting the service?

Quote
More taxis on the road, but are we getting the service?
CAMERON ATFIELD
January 9, 2010 - 6:03AM

Brisbane's taxi fleet has grown by six per cent in the past three years, thanks largely to an influx of migrant drivers, but questions have been raised over whether the quality of customer service has declined.

A spokesman for Transport Minister Rachel Nolan said there 1867 taxi licences in the Brisbane area, up six per cent from 1760 at the end of 2006.

And additional drivers meant more taxis could operate around the clock.

Taxi Council of Queensland chief executive Blair Davies told brisbanetimes.com.au that the increase was due to the influx of new drivers, particularly from India and Africa, who were particularly keen to seek work as drivers.

"The taxi industry all around the world is one where there's generic skills sets," Mr Davies said.

"If you like talking to people and can drive a car, can find your way around the place and you've got a little bit of get up and go entrepreneurialism, then you'll be able to drive a cab anywhere," he said.

"If you've got the motivation to up and leave your home country and come to another country, chances are you've got the entrepreneurial ticker to drive a cab. Hence you see these guys moving into the taxi industry."

Mr Davies said Brisbane now had a "better stock" of taxi drivers, which translated to more taxis sitting on the city's ranks.

"That translates through to faster services for customers," he said.

But Cab Drivers' Association of Queensland secretary Lee Sims said the influx of foreign drivers had led to poorer customer service, due mainly to language problems and unfamiliarity with local driving conditions.

"Never before have taxi drivers had such a bad reputation with the public," he said.

"The blame is being levelled at the newcomer drivers, but it's not their fault. They're not getting the training."

Mr Sims said it had become easier for taxi companies to run taxis around the clock because the foreign-born drivers were "more pliable" than their Australian-born counterparts.

"Never before could you have every taxi out every night at every rank," he said.

Mr Davies said some of the criticism levelled at foreign taxi drivers, including State MP Vaughan Johnson's comments in November that they "all look the same", had fuelled anger in some circles.

"Overseas born drivers were really up in arms over some of the bad reporting that has been going on and some of the urban myths that because you're brown and you look young, you don't know your way around Brisbane," he said.

"The adverse comments have encouraged some of the redneck elements in our society to be offensive to drivers - more verbally than physically- but it's a worrying thing."

Legislation introduced in November made it compulsory for cab drivers to have held an Australian driver's licence for 12 months and be at least 20 years old.

Mr Sims said the legislation was necessary because drivers who were new to Australian road conditions needed more training.

"They're not being trained and they're being thrust into the public uninitiated. That's why the law was changed," he said.

"Most of them are here to do the best they can - I've never had a problem with their attitude or willingness to help in any taxi I've taken. But they're not being trained properly and they're being thrown out like lambs to the slaughter."

Mr Sims said there was a systematic campaign by taxi companies to hire "cheaper" drivers from overseas.

However, Mr Davies said there had been no such formal campaign.

"What we've found is that the guys, particularly from the (Indian) sub-continent, are coming in and driving a cab and recommending it to their friends," he said.

"It's literally spreading by word of mouth."

Mr Davies said "laconic Aussie" drivers were less likely to promote the profession to their friends as an option.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2016, 02:37:52 PM by ozbob »
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2010, 03:57:12 AM »
Taxis fill a significant public transport role eg -->  Personalised public transport

I don't travel by Taxis a great deal but I have never had any real issues.  The occasional driver hasn't been sure of the best routes but that is to be expected. No matter what the background, there will occasionally be issues with any large group.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2010, 01:33:58 PM by ozbob »
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline #Metro

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19133
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2010, 08:05:38 AM »
I use taxis often to:
* fill in the gaps between the bus,
* to avoid going to the city when I want to travel between suburbs

A rare few of these taxi drivers do not care.
There have been times while they have been driving along a main road talking to their mate
on the phone or texting. Extremely scary stuff.

There is not much that can be done as there are only 2 taxi companies. It's 'take it or leave it'.

IIRC Singapore has smartcard payment in the taxi.
Brisbane should get GoCard for taxis and also for parking meters.
Officers could download a list from the local machine and compare that against the cars parked.
It also makes possible to charge people by the exact amount of time they park rather than force people to move or go back after 2 hours.
Negative people... have a problem for every solution.
Posts are commentary and are not necessarily endorsed by RAIL Back on Track or its members. Not affiliated with, paid by or in conspiracy with MTR/Metro.

STB

  • Guest
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2010, 01:11:12 PM »
I don't think it the Go Card would work for normal everyday taxi fares, but I could see it working for the NightLink Flatfare Taxis.

Offline #Metro

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19133
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2010, 09:00:56 PM »
On an interesting note, other countries don't have a time-and-distance fare.
They have set zones just like public transport. Anyone who can drive can become a driver, but the fare level is set.

This might be one idea as it gives the driver a big disincentive to waste time and go via lengthy routes in an attempt to increase the fare. If Singapore can do it, Brisbane can too. They could charge "as the crow flies" fares.
Negative people... have a problem for every solution.
Posts are commentary and are not necessarily endorsed by RAIL Back on Track or its members. Not affiliated with, paid by or in conspiracy with MTR/Metro.

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2010, 03:46:04 AM »
From the Brisbanetimes click here!

City streets may become 'super cab ranks'

Quote
City streets may become 'super cab ranks'
MARISSA CALLIGEROS
January 15, 2010 - 8:44AM

Entire city side streets could be converted to heavily-patrolled cab ranks by nightfall, as authorities move to curb drunken behaviour around Brisbane nightspots.

The proposed cab "super ranks", to be monitored by CCTV cameras and manned by security guards, are being considered by the joint State Government and Brisbane City Council Trading Hours Working Party, spearheaded by the Premier's Department director-general Ken Smith.

The working party is expected to recommend turning smaller streets off major thoroughfares in Fortitude Valley and the CBD into cab ranks manned by taxi marshalls and security officers.

The working party is due to table a series of proposals within the next month to the State Government's Law, Justice and Safety Committee, which is currently leading a parliamentary inquiry into alcohol-related violence.

It is not clear whether the recommendations include moving existing major secure cab ranks on George Street in Brisbane City and Ann and Wickham Streets in Fortitude Valley which currently operate on Friday and Saturday nights.

''The working party has looked at the structure and management of our taxi ranks, which could include the possible relocation of our ranks,” a spokesman for the Premier’s Department told brisbanetimes.com.au today.

''The restructuring and the management of taxi ranks was one of the major recommendations of the working party.''

Taxi Council Queensland CEO Blair Davies, who is yet to see the working party's report, this morning gave in-principle support to the idea.

However, he warned the establishment of super ranks in side streets, further away from pubs and clubs, could be a "step backwards" if not done properly.

"It is the nature of taxi travel that it is door-to-door. We're not a train service, where people queue at a train station. So we would prefer to have smaller, secure ranks in and around [entertainment precincts] that people can go to," Mr Davies said.

He said ranks on George and Caxton streets in Brisbane's CBD and Wickham Street in Fortitude Valley needed to be patrolled each night of the week, rather than Friday and Saturday nights only, to quell booze-fuelled violence.

"Thursday tends to be a big night at Caxton Street. When our secure rank is not operating and that is at least from Sunday through Thursday, people try and hail cabs whenever they can," Mr Davies said.

He said impatient and tired revellers also took to hailing cabs when queues at super ranks became too long.

This, he said, led to the emergence of unofficial ranks similar to that outside Harry's Fine Food fast-food outlet in Petrie Terrace, where a Brisbane man was punched to death in a row over a cab in 2005.

"There needs to be an education process out there to tell people where the secure ranks if they're not prominently located," Mr Davies said.

"Moving those ranks, out of sight [into side streets], could become a huge issue."
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2011, 10:53:20 AM »
Courier Mail --> Cab fares join ranks of nation's highest
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline dwb

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1924
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2011, 10:57:38 AM »
I don't think it the Go Card would work for normal everyday taxi fares, but I could see it working for the NightLink Flatfare Taxis.

Why not?

Offline Golliwog

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4975
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2011, 11:13:20 AM »
I would think there would be issues with the size of the fare. Sure, if it's just down to the shops or something, it would be fine. But that said, on any decent journey its quite easy to get a fare up around $30 which would chew through go card credit quite quickly.

Plus, the $5 deposit wouldn't be enough to cover extra charges.
There is no silver bullet… but there is silver buckshot.
Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

Offline dwb

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1924
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2011, 11:58:29 AM »
I would think there would be issues with the size of the fare. Sure, if it's just down to the shops or something, it would be fine. But that said, on any decent journey its quite easy to get a fare up around $30 which would chew through go card credit quite quickly.

Plus, the $5 deposit wouldn't be enough to cover extra charges.

I don't think that is a valid excuse...

When you tag on a taxi it could show the available balance so both driver and passenger know what is available for the fare. Plus TL could also easily raise the $250 credit maximum. Many journeys by taxi would be shorter than 5-10km and would easily be payable by go card. I don't think we should inconvenience short trip taxi passengers just because people may not have enough credit on their card... that's like saying that you shouldn't take cash as payment because someone might only have $50 in their wallet and it would "chew through their credit". I'm not suggesting replacing EFT, I'm suggesting an alternative to cash... which is exactly what Go card is, an "electronic purse".

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2011, 03:31:31 AM »
From the Couriermail click here!

More taxis on the road to ruin

Quote
More taxis on the road to ruin

    Robyn Ironside
    From: The Courier-Mail
    August 03, 2011 12:00AM

QUEENSLAND has a higher concentration of taxis than New York City and cabbies say it is costing them their livelihood.

Since 2006, the number of taxis in Queensland has increased more than 10 per cent to 3253, giving the state one cab for every 1411 people compared with New York's one for every 1444.

Cabbies claim the oversupply, along with the current downturn in tourism and retail trade, has reduced demand to as few as five fares in a 12-hour shift.

"You can wait for two hours or more at Brisbane Airport for a fare. There's just too many cabs and not enough passengers," a veteran driver, who did not want to be named, said.

As a result, many cabbies are driving for longer and overriding their in-cab safety system.

Taxi Council of Queensland chief executive Blair Davies confirmed demand had not recovered since the global financial crisis in 2007, when it slumped as much as 30 per cent.

"There are a number of reasons why demand is down. The whole tourism industry is hurting and taxis are very much part of that," Mr Davies said.

"There's also a thinking that people aren't going out to shopping centres as much because they're shopping online and that's hurting cabs as well."

He said the cold and lack of major events was also taking a toll.

"Demand can be very seasonal," he said. "When it warms up we tend to see more people going out and using taxis."

Transport Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said an oversupply of taxis had never been raised as an issue with her.

"I am concerned about excessive workloads and we're doing a lot of work to raise awareness of fatigue risk," Ms Palaszczuk said.

Mr Davies said the problem of cabbies manually overriding their in-cab safety system in order to drive for longer was being addressed.

The Courier-Mail revealed on Monday that drivers were opening their bonnets and re-setting the system so they could drive beyond the 16-hour legal limit.

"The manufacturer is providing a patch for the software so the system cannot be reset so easily," Mr Davies said.

He said the taxi council was aware of the difficulties facing drivers but working excessive hours was not the answer.
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline dwb

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1924
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2011, 09:52:44 AM »
People don't catch taxis cos they're so ridiculously expensive here, and difficult to catch.

Cab drivers here are the pickiest about fares I've ever experienced in the world and sit there with the door locked against regulations - they are not allowed to ask you where you're going and turn your location down, but they do.

somebody

  • Guest
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2011, 11:44:36 AM »
I would think there would be issues with the size of the fare. Sure, if it's just down to the shops or something, it would be fine. But that said, on any decent journey its quite easy to get a fare up around $30 which would chew through go card credit quite quickly.

Plus, the $5 deposit wouldn't be enough to cover extra charges.

I don't think that is a valid excuse...

When you tag on a taxi it could show the available balance so both driver and passenger know what is available for the fare. Plus TL could also easily raise the $250 credit maximum. Many journeys by taxi would be shorter than 5-10km and would easily be payable by go card. I don't think we should inconvenience short trip taxi passengers just because people may not have enough credit on their card... that's like saying that you shouldn't take cash as payment because someone might only have $50 in their wallet and it would "chew through their credit". I'm not suggesting replacing EFT, I'm suggesting an alternative to cash... which is exactly what Go card is, an "electronic purse".
There is no point in having a touch on/touch off system because of the size of the deposit, but payment at the end of the fare by Go Card could be possible.  And if not accepted, alternate payment would need to be provided.

Offline dwb

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1924
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2011, 01:17:13 PM »
I would think there would be issues with the size of the fare. Sure, if it's just down to the shops or something, it would be fine. But that said, on any decent journey its quite easy to get a fare up around $30 which would chew through go card credit quite quickly.

Plus, the $5 deposit wouldn't be enough to cover extra charges.

I don't think that is a valid excuse...

When you tag on a taxi it could show the available balance so both driver and passenger know what is available for the fare. Plus TL could also easily raise the $250 credit maximum. Many journeys by taxi would be shorter than 5-10km and would easily be payable by go card. I don't think we should inconvenience short trip taxi passengers just because people may not have enough credit on their card... that's like saying that you shouldn't take cash as payment because someone might only have $50 in their wallet and it would "chew through their credit". I'm not suggesting replacing EFT, I'm suggesting an alternative to cash... which is exactly what Go card is, an "electronic purse".
There is no point in having a touch on/touch off system because of the size of the deposit, but payment at the end of the fare by Go Card could be possible.  And if not accepted, alternate payment would need to be provided.

I would tend to agree, when you hop into a cab you don't have to have your credit card pre-swiped or show cash in your wallet... however it seems that taxi companies are going to use the line that customers will hop in and then at the end of the journey say they didn't realise they didn't have any credit on their go card (exactly as may happen now), but I think they will try and suggest it may increase the amount that happens. Enabling a tag on facility would then also give TL and the cab companies locational data - point to point for journeys which would be useful indeed. It would also enable the cabbie to see what balance you have available and would presumably reduce fraud from the taxi perspective - it would only be able to charge what the fare is, not higher, which happens if the taxi driver "accidentally" types in the incorrect amount on the EFTPOS/credit card machine.

somebody

  • Guest
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2011, 01:38:26 PM »
Good points there.  Perhaps if there is a display of how much credit is/was available the cabbie can ask for evidence of cash once the credit has run out.

Online SurfRail

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6946
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2011, 05:15:35 PM »
The "Licence Raj" system is what is causing the high fares.  Why in hell can't I buy 10 roadworthy vehicles, 10 people to drive them, a basic booking system and set out to undercut Cabcharge with fare 3 times cheaper?

There is no correlation between the $400,000 + cost of a taxi licence and the service we are getting, so I don't buy the arguments about deregulating the whole industry.  I am not interesting in gilding the lily for conglomerates when all I am paying for is a trip home.

somebody

  • Guest
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2011, 06:58:38 PM »
The "Licence Raj" system is what is causing the high fares.  Why in hell can't I buy 10 roadworthy vehicles, 10 people to drive them, a basic booking system and set out to undercut Cabcharge with fare 3 times cheaper?

There is no correlation between the $400,000 + cost of a taxi licence and the service we are getting, so I don't buy the arguments about deregulating the whole industry.  I am not interesting in gilding the lily for conglomerates when all I am paying for is a trip home.
Just improve the PT and there is less demand for taxis.

Sydney has a far more effective taxi system in my experience and has the exact same "Licence Raj" system as you call it.

Offline dwb

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1924
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2011, 08:55:06 PM »
Just improve the PT and there is less demand for taxis.


You can't be serious?!

Taxis are a key component of public transport. They work hand in hand. If taxis are cheaper then *some* (maybe not you, but some other) people may get rid of (or not in the first place) buy their second car (or even their first!). Having less cars at home makes people use PT more. People only will get rid of their cars (or 2nd cars) if they have contestable options.... PT is not always contestable, nor is walking or riding, and carshare may not be available where they live (it is not currently in Brisbane AFAIK), so having a backup (affordable/reliable/easy to hail) taxi is important. You see this is world city after world city - taxis enable people to get rid of or never get cars. Ergo, taxis entirely support public transport patronage.

Personally I think taxis should be more regulated (in the Translink hut, or at least partly in the Translink hut) rather than deregulated, but I think the Yellow/White duopoly doesn't work as is. Licences should be sold for owner drivers, not dodgy owners who buy up all the licences and underpay staff on the race to the bottom.

Offline O_128

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2591
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2011, 10:08:23 PM »
Was funny in london, I decided to get a cab and everyone went no they are so expensive, cost about 10$ to get across town at midnight.  ;D It costs me 20 to get from the city to norman park after midnight here
"Where else but Queensland?"

Offline AnonymouslyBad

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 144
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2011, 10:14:26 PM »
I would tend to agree, when you hop into a cab you don't have to have your credit card pre-swiped or show cash in your wallet... however it seems that taxi companies are going to use the line that customers will hop in and then at the end of the journey say they didn't realise they didn't have any credit on their go card (exactly as may happen now), but I think they will try and suggest it may increase the amount that happens. Enabling a tag on facility would then also give TL and the cab companies locational data - point to point for journeys which would be useful indeed. It would also enable the cabbie to see what balance you have available and would presumably reduce fraud from the taxi perspective - it would only be able to charge what the fare is, not higher, which happens if the taxi driver "accidentally" types in the incorrect amount on the EFTPOS/credit card machine.

Taxi drivers do have the right to ask for a deposit or proof you can pay, and occasionally they do. Obviously it depends on the circumstance, someone making a short trip or dressed for work will never get asked, but the passenger stumbling to a cab after far too many on a Saturday night may be a different story ;)

It'd be nice if taxi fares could be paid on go card, but that means taxis would need all the go card equipment. And I seriously doubt many people would have enough money on their go card for a substantial taxi fare, among the other issues. This could all be overcome of course, but ultimately to roll out go card facilities would cost big money, and I'd rather TL spend their limited funds on actual public transport honestly.

And yes, cabs here are far too expensive!

somebody

  • Guest
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #20 on: August 04, 2011, 11:48:43 AM »
Just improve the PT and there is less demand for taxis.


You can't be serious?!

Taxis are a key component of public transport. They work hand in hand. If taxis are cheaper then *some* (maybe not you, but some other) people may get rid of (or not in the first place) buy their second car (or even their first!). Having less cars at home makes people use PT more. People only will get rid of their cars (or 2nd cars) if they have contestable options.... PT is not always contestable, nor is walking or riding, and carshare may not be available where they live (it is not currently in Brisbane AFAIK), so having a backup (affordable/reliable/easy to hail) taxi is important. You see this is world city after world city - taxis enable people to get rid of or never get cars. Ergo, taxis entirely support public transport patronage.

Personally I think taxis should be more regulated (in the Translink hut, or at least partly in the Translink hut) rather than deregulated, but I think the Yellow/White duopoly doesn't work as is. Licences should be sold for owner drivers, not dodgy owners who buy up all the licences and underpay staff on the race to the bottom.
That was a bit of an over reaction wasn't it?  I said *less* demand, not *no* demand.

Offline dwb

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1924
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2011, 05:23:58 PM »
That was a bit of an over reaction wasn't it?  I said *less* demand, not *no* demand.

I dunno, your comment seemed too dismissive to me but maybe I've got baggage from too many people suggesting government should have nothing to do with carshare, when clearly it has at the very least a supporting regulatory role through allocation of onstreet car spaces... and carshare is proven to be highly PT and AT supportive, just like taxis.

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2011, 08:07:32 PM »
Transport and Multicultural Affairs
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk
02/09/2011

Fairer deal for Qld cabbies

September 2, 2011

Fairer deal for Qld cabbies

A fairer deal for taxi drivers and owners in sharing fare box receipts came into force throughout Queensland yesterday (Thursday, September 1).

Transport Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said the new laws covering taxi bailment agreements would ensure the interests of cabbies and operators were protected in their workplace agreements.

"Taxi drivers generally are not employees of the owners," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"They enter bailment agreements that govern how much each party will earn from fare box receipts.

"Disputes about what is a fair agreement have historically been a major issue for the taxi industry.

"Now the government has worked with all parties in the industry to develop a standard that will work for all owners and drivers.

"The new bailment agreement laws take into account who pays for such things as fuel, cleaning and vehicle maintenance.

"It will provide drivers with greater protection in their commercial negotiations with owners.

"A better deal for drivers will make taxi driving a more attractive job, encouraging more people to join this growing industry."

Ms Palaszczuk said the new laws required all taxi drivers and operators to have signed, written bailment agreements in place, so that both parties are aware of, and understand, the agreed terms under which the taxi is being worked.

"Drivers and operators will need to make sure the bailment agreement covers information such as the driver's personal injury insurance cover, as well as details about the payment arrangements," Ms Palaszczuk said.

Ms Palaszczuk said the reforms also provided new protections to taxi drivers by restricting the use of set pay-in arrangements to drivers who have held driver authorisation in Queensland for at least 12 months.

"While some experienced drivers prefer set pay-in arrangements, where the driver agrees to pay a set amount to the owner rather than a share of fare box receipts, new drivers may not have the knowledge to understand if paying a fixed amount is the best option for them," she said.

"These amendments will provide long-awaited and necessary levels of protection for our taxi drivers whose daily efforts play a critical role in providing a flexible, responsive 24 hour service for all Queenslanders.

"This initiative is one of 47 reforms under the Queensland Taxi Strategic Plan (2010- 2015), which was released in November last year.

"This government is committed to ensuring we retain a world class taxi system for all Queenslanders, both for passengers who use taxi services and for those who sit behind the wheel delivering them."
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline O_128

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2591
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2011, 08:33:31 PM »
A world class taxi system would look like new york. Fares are cheap enough not to own a car. Why not let independents run there own taxi?
"Where else but Queensland?"

Offline dwb

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1924
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #24 on: September 02, 2011, 08:48:02 PM »
A world class taxi system would look like new york. Fares are cheap enough not to own a car.

haha +1. yeah, "world class" my ass!

Offline Stillwater

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5680
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2011, 09:02:18 PM »
Why do the spin doctors want to put the words 'world class' into every government media release?

Offline Fares_Fair

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4510
  • Duplicate the Sunshine Coast Line (#2tracks)
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2011, 09:07:14 PM »
Why do the spin doctors want to put the words 'world class' into every government media release?

You assume they mean this world ... there's much less competition on other worlds.  :-r

Regards,
Fares_Fair.
Regards,
Fares_Fair


Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2012, 04:50:04 AM »
Couriermail --> National survey finds confidence in Queensland taxi industry lowest out of all states
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline O_128

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2591
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2012, 04:44:55 PM »
Out of curiosity would Go carding be a good idea for fares? the city glider shows you can have different fares so why not adjust it, you touch on in the cab and then touch off,
"Where else but Queensland?"

somebody

  • Guest
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2012, 04:48:34 PM »
the city glider shows you can have different fares so why not adjust it, you touch on in the cab and then touch off,
What?  How's it show that at all?

Offline Gazza

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4646
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2012, 05:00:21 PM »
Out of curiosity would Go carding be a good idea for fares? the city glider shows you can have different fares so why not adjust it, you touch on in the cab and then touch off,
CityGlider has standard TL fares. Originally Newman was possibly gonna go it alone, but thankfully TL came to the table.

Offline Stillwater

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5680
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2012, 05:25:54 PM »
Heck, in Liverpool, it's possible to purchase an all-in-one tourist ticket, valid for three days, with access to visitor attractions and 'free' (apart from initial purchase price) bus travel.  Food discounts as well.

http://www.yourticketforliverpool.com/

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2012, 05:20:41 AM »
From the Brisbanetimes click here!

Minister coy on bugged cabs

Quote
Minister coy on bugged cabs
May 30, 2012 - 5:11AM

Queensland's transport minister is staying coy on whether the new government could push ahead with plans to allow passenger conversations to be recorded in cabs.

But Scott Emerson has vowed to ensure the Privacy Commissioner's views are properly taken into account when his department presents a policy paper on the potential capture of audio alongside security camera video.

The minister's comments come ahead of a separate push today by the Taxi Council of Queensland to condemn violence against taxi drivers, including a mob attack in Brisbane at the weekend.

The idea of recording audio in cabs was recommended in a security camera discussion paper released by the Department of Transport and Main Roads under the Bligh government last year.

The paper said camera systems initially supplied and installed in cabs by VerifEye did not have the capability to record audio, but some operators may have chosen to adopt a more sophisticated model since this time.

While some of these systems may be equipped with an audio function, it could not be enabled due to a legislative ban, the paper said.

The capture of audio simultaneously with the images would “provide greater certainty with regard to investigations, particularly in situations of conflicting statements”, the 2011 discussion paper said.

When he was the opposition's transport spokesman, Mr Emerson raised privacy concerns over the recommendation.

brisbanetimes.com.au understands the department is finalising a policy paper on the future of taxi security cameras and it will be presented to Mr Emerson for consideration.

Mr Emerson last night did not respond directly to questions about his stance on the matter, but said he would properly consider privacy issues.

“My concern with this [discussion] paper was that the previous government chose to bypass the Privacy Commissioner before it was released,” he said.

“I've asked that this proposal be considered by the Privacy Commissioner and their feedback incorporated in the department's policy paper when it's presented to me.”

Acting Queensland Privacy Commissioner Lemm Ex said yesterday such proposals always had pros and cons.

He said it was crucial people were made “well aware” before the journey began that audio recording would be undertaken.

“There might be such things as two people from an organisation who might be discussing commercial-in-confidence material or it might be office gossip so people should be aware that any discussion they might have will be recorded,” he said, calling for adequate signage if the proposal was adopted.

The second concern was how the material would be stored and accessed.

“These were covered off to a large degree in the previous discussion paper so I would anticipate that those similar issues would be addressed on any new proposal going forward,” he said.

Mr Ex said the privacy issues related to both passengers and drivers.

“This is a form of workplace surveillance,” he said.

Mr Ex said he did not think he would not go as far as to suggest cab drivers should verbally tell their passengers about the audio recording, so long as people were generally aware.

He suggested a publicity campaign if the government adopted the proposal, saying the deterrence benefit of having the security camera technology rested on people knowing about it.

Mr Ex also said it was important to ensure there were clear guidelines about how the audio could be used, saying it should be focused on crimes and not extended in the future to training purposes or general amusement.

“We have to be mindful there's no function creep,” he said.

Mr Ex said taxi drivers being part of the private sector were not covered by Queensland's information privacy act, which he oversaw, so his comments represented his personal views.

Wellington Combined Taxis in New Zealand last year announced it would not proceed with plans to record conversations in cabs following a passenger backlash.

The former chief executive of the Taxi Council of Queensland, Blair Davies, last year backed calls to allow audio recording, saying it was an issue of safety and there was “no real privacy risk”.

He said concerns about privacy were raised when cameras were first introduced but significant protections were put in place to ensure images were only downloadable for approved purposes.

New Taxi Council of Queensland chief Benjamin Wash was unable to comment last night, but is due to front the media in Brisbane today to raise unrelated concerns about violence against cab drivers.

Mr Wash is expected to disclose details about an attack by a mob of drunken partygoers at the weekend that left a young driver fearing for his life.

Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/minister-coy-on-bugged-cabs-20120529-1zh51.html
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #33 on: June 01, 2012, 02:55:00 AM »
From Melbourne but interesting  ...

Melbourne Age click here!

Taxi fare hikes for peak times

Quote
Taxi fare hikes for peak times
Colin McKinnon
June 1, 2012

A RADICAL overhaul of the Victorian taxi industry promises to deliver more taxis, better qualified and higher-paid drivers - but more expensive fares at weekends and for short trips.

A year-long inquiry into Victoria's ailing taxi system by Professor Allan Fels made 145 recommendations, including a tough new Greater Melbourne Knowledge test to ensure drivers know city landmarks and suburbs.

The pain of fares on Friday and Saturday nights rising at least 20 per cent would be offset by cheaper weekday fares. As well, short trips would cost more and longer trips less, to address complaints that drivers routinely refused to pick up people for short journeys.

''The public has little confidence in the system as it stands today - the industry needs to take strong medicine, to reverse the stagnation and possible decline of the industry and to set it in a new direction,'' Professor Fels said when releasing the report.

Taxi drivers largely endorsed the proposals as offering them a better deal, but the Victorian Taxi Association said there was already adequate competition in the industry.

Professor Fels insisted major structural reform was necessary and the proposals would put hundreds more cabs on the roads at peak times. Taxis were a critical industry, with 5258 licences in Victoria, generating revenue of between $700 million and $800 million a year.

''Victorians and visitors to the state expect our taxis to be available when and where needed by customers; to arrive when booked and to be on time; to be safe, reliable and affordable; and to have drivers who know where they are going and are customer-friendly,'' he said.

The quality of drivers would be enhanced through more stringent entry and training standards. .

The Greater Melbourne Knowledge exam would rigorously test drivers' knowledge of the city, the English language, safety requirements and customer service skills.

It would be challenging, but not as rigorous as the famous London Knowledge test, which takes drivers three to four years to learn and complete, he said.

The cost of getting a licence would be slashed to put more cabs on the road. Approved applicants could obtain a licence for $20,000 a year for five years in Melbourne and slightly less in country Victoria.

''Metro taxi licences have cost as much as $500,000, which leads to higher fares, higher costs for operators and lower driver payments,''' Professor Fels said.

But the inquiry rejected full deregulation, where licences would have been available for a small administrative fee. Professor Fels, writing in today's Age, said this would have meant the value of licences would ''fall to zero''.

Existing licenses would continue to be bought and sold in the same way and licence holders could continue to assign their licence to a third party.

Professor Fels said the average wage of Melbourne cab drivers was about $13 an hour. The new minimum hourly rate would be several dollars higher than that, especially on Friday and Saturday nights when higher fares would kick in. Under the proposals, drivers would receive 60 per cent of fares and cab owners 40 per cent. Now, drivers receive no more than 50 per cent of fares and often less.

Hawa Add, a 60-year-old driver from North Melbourne, said ''short trips are difficult because so many times we drive the cab around with no passenger inside after a short trip. And why not take a test? It's important.''

Mukhtiar Tanoli, 45, a driver from Tarneit, said it was a ''good

start''. ''The test of knowledge is good,'' he said. ''A driver needs to know the landmarks and his way around.

''We might get $16 to $25 an hour under this plan on some nights. But the industry is struggling and it could lead to small and even some big operators struggling more and possibly going out of business.''

The Victorian Taxi Association, representing cab owners, said it disagreed with some recommendations.

''We think there's strong competition already in the industry,'' said spokesman David Samuel. ''The new discounted licences will devalue existing licences and I don't think the report will bring better outcomes.''

But the Federation of Community Legal Centres, which has represented several taxi drivers in legal disputes, endorsed the proposals to improve working conditions for drivers and to make comprehensive insurance compulsory.

''In Victoria, taxi drivers have hardly any rights, earn little money and have almost no bargaining power in the workplace,'' community lawyer Lucie O'Brien said.

Most drivers were international students or recent immigrants. ''They have no minimum wages, sick leave, annual leave, superannuation or rights against unfair dismissal,'' she said

The Victorian Council of Social Service endorsed a proposal for a more accessible taxi system, including a central booking service for wheelchair-accessible taxis.

The report will be open for six weeks of public consultation before being sent to the state government. Transport Minister Terry Mulder said: ''At the end of this process we will have a better system.''

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/taxi-fare-hikes-for-peak-times-20120531-1zkt3.html
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #34 on: September 09, 2012, 02:43:34 AM »
From the Couriermail click here!

Taxi fares in Queensland to increase at start of school holidays

Quote
Taxi fares in Queensland to increase at start of school holidays

    by: Renee Viellaris
    From: The Sunday Mail (Qld)
    September 09, 2012 12:00AM

TAXI fares across the state will increase later this month.

Despite cost of living pressures hitting households after increases in private health insurance, power prices and child care, the Queensland Government approved the statewide fare hike.

The 2 per cent increase, revealed late this week in the Government Gazette, will add an extra 80 cents for every 10km travelled from noon. It takes effect at the start of the school holidays on September 22.

Transport Minister Scott Emerson said an average fare of $20 would cost passengers only 41 cents more.

Queensland is the second most expensive state in Australia to catch a cab but the industry has defended the rise, describing it as "modest".

Taxi Council of Queensland president Max McBride said it was the industry's first rise in about 15 months, despite being hit by rising fuel costs and expensive compulsory third party insurance.

Mr McBride said most passengers would not notice it.

"It will only apply to the kilometre rate (rising in southeast Queensland from $2.06 a km to $2.14 a km)...it's a very small increase," Mr McBride said.

"The public will understand it's more than reasonable."

Industry expert John Rahilly admitted the start of the increase was "unfortunate timing" for parents travelling during the school holidays.

Mr Rahilly said the rise was in line with inflation and he did not expect any further increases in the short term.

Mr Emerson said the Government was committed to lowering the cost of living for families and "this will be reflected in the budget on Tuesday".

"While a 2.07 per cent taxi fare increase has been approved, this is lower than the last three years of fare increases under the previous Labor Government of 2.39, 2.27 and 4.4 per cent," he said.

"Queensland's increase is also lower compared to the recent NSW approved increase of 3.7 per cent in July."

Labor's transport spokeswoman Jackie Trad said the increase was another broken government promise.

The rise comes as the industry considers plans to roll out a new metering system controlled by a dispatch centre, and not the driver.

Mr McBride said the system was being discussed.

Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #35 on: September 09, 2012, 01:51:07 PM »
Taxi fares have gone up 2.39 + 2.27 + 4.4 + 2.07 = 11.13%

Public transport fares 65% over the same period

Quote
... Mr Emerson said the Government was committed to lowering the cost of living for families and "this will be reflected in the budget on Tuesday" ...

 :is-
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2012, 09:23:23 AM »
http://www.tcq.org.au/about-tcq/tcq-media

12 Sep 2012
Taxi Council warns disabled and aged passengers of budget fine print
 
The Taxi Council of Queensland (TCQ) is concerned that changes to the Taxi Subsidy Scheme in yesterday’s state budget will disadvantage the most needy and vulnerable in the community.
 
From July 1 next year, a new annual limit of $400 per person will be placed on travel under the scheme, meaning higher users will have to pay more or forgo travel.
 
Chief Executive Officer of TCQ Benjamin Wash said the changes were made without industry consultation and may have a major impact on the lives of the aged and people with disabilities.
 
He explained that based on an average fare under the scheme, eligible users will be limited to less than one taxi trip per week.
 
“Many mobility impaired customers work in regular jobs and need travel up to twice per day. In addition elderly customers tend to travel twice per week – or 100 plus trips per year - simply for normal grocery shopping.
 
“Others travel more than twice per week for medical and other reasons.”
 
Mr Wash said the changes, which were “snuck into the budget” come only weeks after the Newman Government scrapped the proposed $6.50 wheelchair subsidy for the industry.
 
“The changes announced in the budget don’t make any sense. They affect the more vulnerable people in the community as well as taxi drivers, who are small business people, and they don’t save the Government much.”
 
“The Government has kept the same overall allocation to the scheme but reduced the ability of people to use it. It’s like saving money by stealth.”
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #37 on: September 18, 2012, 09:25:22 AM »
http://www.tcq.org.au/about-tcq/tcq-media

12 Sep 2012
Taxi Council warns disabled and aged passengers of budget fine print
 
The Taxi Council of Queensland (TCQ) is concerned that changes to the Taxi Subsidy Scheme in yesterday’s state budget will disadvantage the most needy and vulnerable in the community.
 
From July 1 next year, a new annual limit of $400 per person will be placed on travel under the scheme, meaning higher users will have to pay more or forgo travel.
 
Chief Executive Officer of TCQ Benjamin Wash said the changes were made without industry consultation and may have a major impact on the lives of the aged and people with disabilities.
 
He explained that based on an average fare under the scheme, eligible users will be limited to less than one taxi trip per week.
 
“Many mobility impaired customers work in regular jobs and need travel up to twice per day. In addition elderly customers tend to travel twice per week – or 100 plus trips per year - simply for normal grocery shopping.
 
“Others travel more than twice per week for medical and other reasons.”
 
Mr Wash said the changes, which were “snuck into the budget” come only weeks after the Newman Government scrapped the proposed $6.50 wheelchair subsidy for the industry.
 
“The changes announced in the budget don’t make any sense. They affect the more vulnerable people in the community as well as taxi drivers, who are small business people, and they don’t save the Government much.”
 
“The Government has kept the same overall allocation to the scheme but reduced the ability of people to use it. It’s like saving money by stealth.”

This will have a devastating impact on many disabled people who are taxi dependent.

This morning on 612 ABC Brisbane this issue was raised a number of carers phoned in to discuss just how severe this will be on many disabled members of our community.

My comment which was read out on radio:

===========

Twitter

Robert Dow ‏@Robert_Dow

@612brisbane Steve, go card easily rorted for free travel by the able, disabled folks grounded ... time for a fare review I think ...
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #38 on: September 20, 2012, 08:35:22 PM »
Thank you ..

============

Minister for Transport and Main Roads
The Honourable Scott Emerson

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Panel to review taxi scheme

Disability and community groups will be invited to join a panel to make recommendations on the future of Queensland's taxi subsidy scheme.

Transport and Main Roads Minister Scott Emerson said membership of the scheme had almost doubled since it was last reviewed in 2008.

“The scheme is overdue for review so my Department will sit down with community groups, disability groups and the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services to look at the future needs of members,” Mr Emerson said.

“I want to hear from the panel about how we can continue to meet the challenge of sustaining the scheme, particularly in difficult financial times.”

Membership of the taxi subsidy scheme is currently 51,600 and this number is expected to continue to grow.

The 2012-13 Queensland budget included an annual $400 cap which would cover more than 80 per cent of current members and save up to $7.5 million a year when implemented from July 1, 2013.

“The poor fiscal situation left by the former Labor government means we need to look closely at all programs to make sure they are being run as effectively as possible,” Mr Emerson said.

“Over the last couple of days I’ve raised concerns with the Premier and we agreed that the scheme needs to be reviewed to remain affordable and meet community expectations.

“I’m also keen to look at better coordination of information for similar transport schemes such as Queensland Health’s Patient Travel Subsidy Scheme, DETE’s School Transport Assistance Program for Students with Disabilities, Centrelink’s Mobility Allowance, DVA’s Recreation Transport Allowance and Local Government’s Council Cabs.”

Membership of the panel will be finalised in the coming weeks and the first workshop will be held later this year with the review to be completed before mid-2013.
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Online ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Taxis & Ridesharing - articles, discussion ...
« Reply #39 on: October 08, 2012, 03:27:07 PM »
Brisbanetimes --> Taxi refusals just not fare
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


“You can't understand a city without using its public transportation system.” -- Erol Ozan