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Author Topic: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)  (Read 43944 times)

Online ozbob

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TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« on: October 26, 2008, 01:22:55 PM »
The term TOD, Transit Oriented Development is now being used more and more.  

What is a TOD?

http://www.dip.qld.gov.au/urban-planning/transit-oriented-development.html

Quote
Transit Oriented Development

Transit oriented development is a concept which involves concentrating a mix of uses ? housing,  shops, offices and other facilities ? around transport hubs such as train stations and busway stations.

Precincts where transit oriented development principles are applied are called transit oriented communities.

Transit oriented development is a key policy of the SEQ Regional Plan and supports delivery of a range of key government priorities relating to climate change, housing affordability, congestion and health and physical activity.

TODs are planned for Albion, Wooloongabba and Milton.  Springfield was touted as being 'TOD like' but unfortunately the most important ingredient is still to come (the railway ...).

Some more links well worth exploring:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transit-oriented_development

http://www.transitorienteddevelopment.org/

http://www.dpi.wa.gov.au/cityregionalplanning/15677.asp

http://www.urbanecology.org.au/topics/transitorienteddevelopment.html
« Last Edit: April 07, 2010, 11:14:58 AM by ozbob »
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Offline Derwan

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2008, 09:02:46 AM »
The concept of a TOD is a good one - but consideration must be given for the increased patronage of services.  It is not a simple matter of plonking the development over a railway station and expecting the current level of service to cater for it.
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Offline O_128

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2008, 07:40:05 PM »
I would expect that when albion is TOD is built it will be refubished al-la fortudude cally though with reference to its past and the surrounding area,outhbank is also poised for a TOD as is springfield and a TOD at cleveland is being investigated
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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2008, 08:05:42 AM »
From the Brisbanetimes click here!

Why transit-oriented is the new black

Quote
Why transit-oriented is the new black
Shannon Molloy | November 18, 2008

Property insiders have turned the term "transit-oriented development" into industry buzzwords in recent years, but it isn't all fluff; experts believe Brisbane's future must be built around train lines and bus terminals.

----------
PHOTOS: Brisbane's transit-oriented developments  external link Brisbanetimes
----------

Constructing a mixed-use development of residential, commercial and retail space on top of public transport infrastructure is not a new idea.

Major cities in Europe and North America embraced the idea of living and working around bus, tram and rail nodes decades ago, Colliers International research analyst Lachlan Walker said.

Geared around creating "walkable communities", randport-oriented develoments - or TODs as they are known - bring together a range of uses and are designed to link working, living, learning and entertainment.

A central aim is slash people's reliance on cars, which is critical in a city like Brisbane where traffic congestion is a growing problem.

"TODs usually result in reduced car usage, reduced car ownership, increased use of public transport, reduced carbon footprint, increased local business activity and more efficient use of existing infrastructure," Mr Walker said.

"Residents can fulfil most of their daily needs within a short walk of their home, and are more likely to use public transport to travel further from home."

Property analyst Michael Matusik said the model also offered the potential to create a cheaper living option for residents, with reduced transport costs and improving housing affordability.

"TOD concepts can be applied to create new community hubs or transform existing areas, and can be an alternative to the ever-rising cost of car travel," Mr Matusik said.

The design theme is also a return to more traditional concepts of neighbourhoods and villages, albeit with a modern twist, he said.

"Historical photographs often reveal railway stations surrounded by stores, hotels, offices and multi-family housing that were linked to adjacent downtown areas.

"As populations expanded, properties near railway stations were acquired to accommodate commuter parking needs, eventually creating a no-man's land separating communities from their transit stations."

Despite the potential for smart development, Mr Matusik said there were some barriers in the form of poor transport design and community fears that TODs will harm the character of their neighbourhoods.

In Brisbane, several transit-oriented projects are either underway or in their final stages of planning and the first should start taking shape as early as 2011.

"Developers have recognised the benefits and a number of projects in various stages of planning have been designed around the principal of TOD," Mr Walker said.

Union at Milton was one of the first publicly-touted developments to centre itself around existing and future public transport facilities.

The $250 million development will consist of two buildings, 11- and 30-stories tall, with a range of residential, commercial and hotel options.

To the north of the city, The Mill at Albion will see the area around the local train station transformed into a vibrant precinct that also embraces urban renewal principles.

Buranda Village is a large-scale TOD on the fringe of Woolloongabba that sits between a busway and train station on Logan Road.

The ambitious project includes eight buildings, with the tallest standing at 32-storeys, and mixes residential, commercial, retail and hotel uses with a range of lifestyle offerings.

When complete, the Buranda Village community will dwarf the Emporium development at Fortitude Valley on which it is modelled.

Mr Walker said the RNA Showgrounds precinct, Hamilton North Shore and parts of Yeerongpilly and The Gabba have also been earmarked for future TOD sites.
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Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2010, 05:11:32 PM »
From the Brisbane mX 1 February 2010 page 2

Building on track

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Jon Bryant

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2010, 06:28:50 AM »
To make TOD's successful we also need to change our transport planning approach.  Under our current approach almost 70% of trips will still be assumed to be by car.  TOD's need to be designed with a active and public transport at around 60%.

Offline Derwan

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2010, 08:43:43 AM »
So it's the council's fault that no work has commenced?
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Jon Bryant

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2010, 09:10:25 AM »
The GFC took a lot of heat out of the urgency to develop but the approval process has taken a long long time as TOD's planning requirements are usually outside the requirements of town planning (i.e. highets, densities, car parking, etc).  Plus there is the QR/Transport to work with as well on station redevelopment, air psace rights and or sale/lease of QR property (i.e. the car parks). 

All in all they are complex proposals (I worked on the original Cannon Hill and Fitzgibbon TOD proposals).  It helps if the planning is already in place but in many cases it is not and that's where it gets complex.  Thus it is critical the town plans are changed now to allow for TODs and for QR/Transport to be ready and willing to work.  Not say this is not happening because there are signs that it is. 

I think incentives and contribution reductions need to also be considered to encourage this type of development.

Offline O_128

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2010, 04:31:26 PM »
The GFC took a lot of heat out of the urgency to develop but the approval process has taken a long long time as TOD's planning requirements are usually outside the requirements of town planning (i.e. highets, densities, car parking, etc).  Plus there is the QR/Transport to work with as well on station redevelopment, air psace rights and or sale/lease of QR property (i.e. the car parks). 

All in all they are complex proposals (I worked on the original Cannon Hill and Fitzgibbon TOD proposals).  It helps if the planning is already in place but in many cases it is not and that's where it gets complex.  Thus it is critical the town plans are changed now to allow for TODs and for QR/Transport to be ready and willing to work.  Not say this is not happening because there are signs that it is. 

I think incentives and contribution reductions need to also be considered to encourage this type of development.

what cannon hill TOD?? also we are starting to get somwhere. Wynnum central station and surrounds has permission for upto 12 stories which is a start.
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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2010, 06:24:58 PM »
It is a long storey and best told over a beer. Yes the urban planning is getting there the the transport planning however assumes PT will always play a minor role and we had beeter build enough road space to cater for it all.   

Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2010, 11:10:10 AM »
Minister for Infrastructure and Planning
The Honourable Stirling Hinchliffe
07/04/2010

Minister considers calling-in proposed Milton Transit Oriented Development

Minister for Infrastructure and Planning Stirling Hinchliffe is considering calling in a 31-storey proposed Transit Oriented Development (TOD) at Milton City train station.

On 3 February 2010 the Brisbane City Council (BCC) approved a development application by FKP for the mixed-use development at Cribb Street and Railway Terrace Milton. This approval is due to be appealed in the Planning and Environment Court by a local resident's action group due to concerns regarding compliance with the existing town plan.

Mr Hinchliffe said he would consider calling-in the proposal on the grounds of state interest and to allow the project to be reassessed ahead of lengthy court action that could jeopardise the potential development.

A TOD is a mixed-use precinct built walking distance from an existing or future rail, light rail or busway station that allows people to live, work and play closer to central Brisbane with reduced reliance on cars. For more than five years, the South East Queensland Regional Plan has identified that TODs in urban growth areas, specifically including Milton, would help address population growth issues such as traffic congestion, housing affordability and the effects of climate change.

"Following my own considerations, and approaches by the applicant and Brisbane City Council, I am considering whether or not to call this development in on state interest grounds," Mr Hinchliffe said.

"A cornerstone of the South East Queensland Regional Plan 2009-2031 (SEQRP) is the improved integration between land use and transport options.

"The regional plan identifies the importance of additional residential redevelopment in well located urban areas such as the Milton Citytrain station to bring more people closer to more transport and alleviate traffic congestion and impact on our environment and liveability.

"The delivery of TODs is key to meeting these targets.

"FKP's proposed Milton development incorporates sustainable design elements and is consistent with the objectives of BCC's draft Milton Station Neighbourhood Plan.

"Yesterday I wrote to key stakeholders asking them to provide me with their feedback on the possibility of a call-in, before I make any decision on whether to use these reserve powers. This feedback must be provided by April 12.

"If I decide to proceed with a call-in, the process will allow a reassessment of the development application and final decision on the project to be made in a much shorter time frame."

The proposed TOD is comprised of 303 residential units and office/gym, retail, restaurant and railway activities. The development could also provide significant station upgrades including station access, platforms, community artwork and ticket offices.

Call-in powers are available to the Planning Minister under the Sustainable Planning Act 2009 and allow the Minister to decide an application in place of the relevant local government.

If the Minister calls in the application, he will then reassess the application using the Integrated Development Assessment System (IDAS) before making a decision on the development. That decision could not be appealed.

The last day the development could be called-in is 16 April, 2010.

==============================================================

 :o
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Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2010, 11:24:51 AM »
See this related thread too     
Impact of Transit Oriented Developments --> http://railbotforum.org/mbs/index.php?topic=3679.0
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Offline dwb

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2010, 08:50:44 PM »
Quote
So it's the council's fault that no work has commenced?

No.

If you change an application it has to be re-assessed. This occurs for a "tod" as much as a house. Milton and Albion are both examples of where the applicant has changed the application during process/after receiving approval from Council, due in large part to changing financial circumstances and the economic viability of the proposals.

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2010, 11:06:57 PM »
Quote
Yes the urban planning is getting there the the transport planning however assumes PT will always play a minor role and we had beeter build enough road space to cater for it all.   

This is starting to change.
The citygliders (sexed up BUZ basically) are in the pipeline.
Why they are taking so long, and especially when we have been told "buses are more flexible and can be put of faster"... anyway, its coming.

The second thing is that the Metro planning is slowly taking shape. It is still a while off, but this will give the absolute highest quality service PT money can buy for residents of inner Brisbane. This will knock the pants off the car.

I think LRT would still have application on specific, high volume, surface corridors around the city. New Farm & West End to CBD are obvious routes...
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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2010, 04:27:52 AM »
From the Courier Mail click here!

Public transport hub plan for residential developments off track

Quote
Public transport hub plan for residential developments off track

    * Steven Wardill and Peta Fuller
    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * April 07, 2010 7:52PM

A KEY strategy to squeeze more residents into southeast Queensland suburbs through high-density developments around public transport hubs has flopped.

Six years after touting transit-orientated developments as part of the solution to growth, the State Government has admitted the strategy has been mired by inertia and confusion.

The mixed-use developments that were supposed to spring up around train, bus and future light-rail hubs such as Milton, Bowen Hills and Woolloongabba have failed to materialise.

Infrastructure Minister Stirling Hinchliffe admitted a variety of factors had hindered developments, including difficulty accessing financing, tardy council planning and poor understanding among transport authorities.

"It was hoped that we would be there but for a whole range of reason we haven't got there and we need to take it further," he said.

The Government signalled its intention not to accept any further delays. Mr Hinchliffe announced he was considering using his "call in" powers for a proposed development at Milton.

The 31-storey proposal near the Milton train station is facing court action by angry locals after it was approved by Brisbane City Council.

Mr Hinchliffe said he hoped the move was not a precedent as such developments were essential to accommodate the additional million southeast Queensland residents expected by 2026.

"I am concerned that lengthy legal proceedings . . . could be enough to put (the development) in jeopardy."

Developer FKP manager Evian Delfabbro said the company wanted the minister to intervene and had written to him requesting the action.

"FKP wrote to the minister on 29 March asking for his assistance in the matter after our development approval granted by council was appealed," she said.

However, Concerned Residents Against Milton's Excessive Development chairwoman, Elizabeth Handley, said the group appealed because the development was approved by council while its local neighbourhood plan was in the consultation phase.

Ms Handley said the group had met with the Minister but were up against influential developers.

"Developers seem to wield an enormous amount of power in this city," she said.
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Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2010, 06:16:06 AM »
From the Brisbanetimes click here!

Residents slam 'sledgehammer' approach to planning

Quote
Residents slam 'sledgehammer' approach to planning
DANIEL HURST AND COURTNEY TRENWITH
April 8, 2010 - 5:26AM

The Queensland government would be turning its back on the community it if it pushes through approval of a 31-storey highrise at Milton, a local action group says.

Infrastructure and Planning Minister Stirling Hinchliffe said yesterday he may "call in" the development to ensure it went ahead on the grounds of state interest, in a move that would stifle court action against the proposal.

Brisbane City Council has already approved the 31-storey mixed-use development at the Milton train station which would help accommodate the city's population boom.

However, construction of the building at Cribb Street and Railway Terrace has been stalled by an appeal lodged in the Planning and Environment Court by a local residents' action group that claims the building does not comply with the existing town plan.

Elizabeth Handley, chair of the Concerned Residents Against Milton's Excessive Development group, said an approval under the state's call-in powers would be a slap in the face for the community.

"That would imply that they're not interested in anything that a local community has to say ... and they have forgotten who elects them," she said.

"Two years may be a long time for people to remember about things, but the building will be standing there to remind everybody."

Ms Handley warned the government against taking a "sledgehammer approach to town planning", saying approval of the tower would push up building heights in surrounding areas.

"I think it puts all Queenslanders who enjoy their community at risk," she said.

"Once developments are built we're stuck with them and there's no turning back from it."

Ms Handley said residents launched a court appeal against the development because they were concerned about its impact on traffic, flooding and amenities as well as inadequate infrastructure.

"This is not frivolous - this is about the way that we want our community to be. It shouldn't be something that's imposed on us. They know it's not a frivolous appeal," she said.

Ms Handley said residents were writing to the minister demanding he reject the development outright, rather than push through an approval that could not be appealed.

"I think they probably are leaning towards the approval and I actually believe they think we've got a very good chance of getting this knocked back in the Planning and Environment Court, and that's what's starting to panic everybody," she said.

Mr Hinchliffe said the proposed project was a Transit Oriented Development - a mixed-use precinct within walking distance of an existing or future public transport station that allowed people to live, work and play closer to central Brisbane with reduced reliance on cars.

The proposed development, by builders FKP, includes 303 residential units and office, gym, retail, restaurant and railway facilities.

Mr Hinchliffe said it could also provide significant train station upgrades including station access, platforms, community artwork and ticket offices.

Government involvement would allow a final decision to be made "ahead of lengthy court action that could jeopardise the potential development", he said.

A decision to call in the development could not be appealed by either opponents or developers.

''A cornerstone of the South East Queensland Regional Plan 2009-2031 is the improved integration between land use and transport options," Mr Hinchliffe said.

''The regional plan identifies the importance of additional residential redevelopment in well located urban areas such as the Milton city train station to bring more people closer to more transport and alleviate traffic congestion and impact on our environment and livability.

''The delivery of TODs is key to meeting these targets.

''FKP's proposed Milton development incorporates sustainable design elements and is consistent with the objectives of [Brisbane City Council's] draft Milton Station Neighbourhood Plan."

Mr Hinchliffe yesterday wrote to stakeholders requesting their feedback on the possibility of a "call-in" by April 12.

A decision on whether to take over development approval for the proposal will be made by April 16.
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Offline #Metro

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2010, 07:09:22 AM »
Bring on the TODS.
I support TODs
I love TODs
More TODs
TODs Everywhere

TODs, TODs, TODs.
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Offline #Metro

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #17 on: April 08, 2010, 11:33:01 AM »
Quote
The mixed-use developments that were supposed to spring up around train, bus and future light-rail hubs such as Milton, Bowen Hills and Woolloongabba have failed to materialise.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/property/plans-for-property-hubs-near-train-stations-have-gone-off-the-rails/story-e6frequ6-1225851263918

Seems like a lot of comments about the Milton TOD.
What's this about light rail hubs?
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 12:17:55 PM by tramtrain »
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Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2010, 01:42:15 PM »
Minister for Infrastructure and Planning
The Honourable Stirling Hinchliffe
16/04/2010

Minister calls-in Milton Transit Oriented Development

Minister for Infrastructure and Planning Stirling Hinchliffe has today called-in a proposed Transit Oriented Development (TOD) at Railway Terrace, Milton.

Mr Hinchliffe said he called-in the proposed 31-storey development adjacent to Milton Station on grounds of state interest and to allow the project to be reassessed ahead of lengthy court action that could jeopardise the potential development.

On 3 February 2010 the Brisbane City Council (BCC) approved a development application by FKP for the mixed-use development at Cribb Street and Railway Terrace Milton. This approval was due to be appealed in the Planning and Environment Court by a local resident's action group due to concerns regarding compliance with the town plan.

"After asking for submissions from interested parties two weeks ago, I have decided that the state interests warrant my involvement," Mr Hinchliffe said.

"A cornerstone of the South East Queensland Regional Plan 2009-2031 is the improved integration between land use and transport.

"The regional plan identifies the importance of additional residential redevelopment in well located urban areas to meet Brisbane's infill dwelling targets.

"The delivery of TODs is a key policy if we are to meet these targets."

A TOD is a mixed-use precinct built walking distance from an existing or future rail, light rail or busway station that allows people to live, work and play closer to central Brisbane with reduced reliance on cars.

For more than five years, the South East Queensland Regional Plan has identified that TODs in urban growth areas, specifically including Milton, would help address population growth issues such as traffic congestion, housing affordability and the effects of climate change.

Call-in powers are available to the Planning Minister under the Sustainable Planning Act 2009 and allow the Minister to decide an application in place of the relevant local government. The Planning Minister can 'call-in' a development based on State Interest Grounds.

"Calling-in this development allows a reassessment of the development application and final decision on the project to be made in a much shorter time frame," Mr Hinchliffe said.

"The decision to 'call-in' will allow me to use the Integrated Development Assessment System (IDAS) to reassess the application, and make a final, binding decision in 20 business days."

The proposed TOD is comprised of 303 residential units and office/gym, retail, restaurant and railway activities. The development could also provide significant station upgrades including station access, platforms, community artwork and ticket offices.

==============================================================
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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2010, 04:12:28 PM »
Sorry local resident group but this had to be done it TODs were doomed. 

Offline O_128

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2010, 04:46:31 PM »
Of course it will get pushed through, Sorry Milton residents but its not like this is happening in samford, there are already relatively small high rises in milton, there is a stadium and a brewery. This has to go through for the sake of other TODs
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Offline #Metro

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2010, 05:08:19 PM »
I would like to understand their position.
It seem that there is a lot of opposition which tends to feed off uncertainties and unclear information.
And we never really hear statements from the developers etc.
I read that the approval was for 31 stories or something huge like that- but does this actually mean they are going to build that high?

IIRC think the CBD has a maximum building height of infinity meters (e.g. there is no maximum).
So someone could get (in theory) a building that goes from Earth to The Moon, does not mean that is what they will build.

I think Toowong is a good model TOD, we need mini-CBDs with real job clusters not just big shopping centres.
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Offline O_128

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2010, 05:43:38 PM »
I would like to understand their position.
It seem that there is a lot of opposition which tends to feed off uncertainties and unclear information.
And we never really hear statements from the developers etc.
I read that the approval was for 31 stories or something huge like that- but does this actually mean they are going to build that high?

IIRC think the CBD has a maximum building height of infinity meters (e.g. there is no maximum).
So someone could get (in theory) a building that goes from Earth to The Moon, does not mean that is what they will build.

I think Toowong is a good model TOD, we need mini-CBDs with real job clusters not just big shopping centres.

Approval is for 31 stories so the building will be that tall, originally it was for only 17 stories
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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2010, 08:40:33 PM »
Interesting ontopic thesis

--> http://eprints.qut.edu.au/31827/

Ginn, Simon (2009) The application of the Park & Ride and TOD concepts to develop a new framework that can maximise public transport patronage. [QUT Thesis]
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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2010, 07:44:28 PM »
From the Brisbanetimes click here!

Brisbane home buyers on the right track

Quote
Brisbane home buyers on the right track
MARISSA CALLIGEROS
May 6, 2010 - 3:36PM

Brisbane's property boom compass was once firmly fixed on school zones and shopping precincts.

Now, the river city's train network is propelling price growth.

Earlier this year, property analysts told brisbanetimes.com.au suburbs boasting a rail station linked to the CBD would see marked growth, signalling a push for transit-oriented development.

And figures released yesterday appear to back this claim.

According to a PRDnationwide report, property values in Brisbane suburbs with a train station jumped 10.3 per cent between January and December last year.

These suburbs outperformed those with no rail service, which achieved 7.7 per cent growth in the same year.

The median house price in suburbs serviced by a train station was $590,000 in December 2009, while it was $538,500 in those without.

"Population growth in Brisbane is surging ahead and the capacity of roads to cater for the influx of residents, particularly during peak traffic times, is such that alternative methods of transport are in high demand," said Josh Brown, PRDnationwide research analyst.

"With the increasing costs of fuel, parking and traffic congestion, buyers are seeking areas of convenience and high amenity negating the need for frequent car usage."

Suburbs within 15 kilometres of the CBD, located along the trainline from Salisbury to Virginia saw the best capital growth last year.

"The North Coast Rail Line suburbs [including Albion, Wooloowin, Nundah, Northgate and Virginia] have recorded a 17.2 per cent spike in growth over 2009 to record a final median value of $566,750," Mr Brown said.

This was followed by suburbs along the Pinkenba Rail Line, including Clayfield, Hendra and Eagle Farm, which registered 16.7 per cent price growth to a median price of $857,500.

"The most affordable rail line within this precinct is the South Coast [Beenleigh] Rail Line suburbs with a final median price over the six months to December 2009 of $516,000," Mr Brown said.

RP Data research director Tim Lawless said while suburbs serviced by major busways were performing well, they did not achieve the same capital growth as areas with train stations.

"Potential buyers are placing a much higher premium on being able to locate themselves in an area that does have an efficient transport system ... although trains seem to be preferred, because they are generally a lot more regular and reliable service," Mr Lawless said.

He said the gap between suburbs with and without train stations looked set to widen in the future.

"The demand for homes in well-serviced areas will certainly increase, which will drive prices higher," Mr Lawless said.

He said the gap would be greatest in outer suburbs where rail was the only viable mode of public transport for CBD-bound commuters.

"When you get further from the city that trend certainly becomes more extreme," he said.

Property Analyst Michael Matusik told brisbanetimes.com.au in December outer suburbs with established rail services would prove fruitful for first home-buyers.

"Rail is the key, and being close to railway stations is a potential driver for best growth. In any case you could start from the terminus, say if you went to Cleveland, and work your way inwards," Mr Matusik said.
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Offline Golliwog

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2010, 08:37:50 PM »
Well I see that as good news that people want to use the rail system. Only downside is as the article says, they are just buying houses in the suburb and so will most likely end up driving to the station, and exacerbate the parking and traffic issues that already surround most stations.

Still, it shows that people actively WANT to live near stations and use them, so should hopefully make those developers on the fence about TOD's go for it.

I agree with Tramtrain, that Toowong is a good example, although isn't that tower purely offices? But last I saw they were expanding and building a medium density building (not sure if its office space or apartments) nearby which I think is great.
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Offline dwb

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2010, 08:11:23 AM »
You don't necessarily have to have housing in/on top of the railway station for it to be "tod"... the concept of tod is more accurately referred to as transit oriented PRECINCTS.... it is about the whole area, not single site developments like the development industry seems to have coopted.

Plus in relation to :
Quote
"Potential buyers are placing a much higher premium on being able to locate themselves in an area that does have an efficient transport system ... although trains seem to be preferred, because they are generally a lot more regular and reliable service," Mr Lawless said.

Generally a lot more regular ?!?! Mr Lawless obviously drives to work, probably in the city in Riverside Centre!

Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2010, 06:24:55 PM »
Minister for Infrastructure and Planning
The Honourable Stirling Hinchliffe
12/05/2010

Yeerongpilly Transit Oriented Development the way of the future

The Bligh Government and Brisbane City Council are well on the way to seeing a State-owned land parcel developed into a market-leading transit orientated development (TOD) at Yeerongpilly.

Minister for Infrastructure and Planning Stirling Hinchliffe and Lord Mayor Campbell Newman today signed a Memorandum of Understanding to confirm their commitment to the retail/residential project and outline how the partnership would proceed.

Mr Hinchliffe said by working together, the State and council had a unique opportunity to bring essential land to market when it was needed most.

"A TOD is a mixed use residential/retail precinct within walking distance of a rail or bus station which allows people to live, work and play closer to the central Brisbane CBD with a reduced reliance on cars,'' Mr Hinchliffe said.

"Over the next 12 months the State Government and Council will finalise planning for the site which could see the first parcels of land available to the public by early 2011.

"It's vital for housing affordability that this land be developed, but it's also imperative the community have their say. Community consultation will begin in coming months to inform residents and help shape the proposal.

"In the face of population growth transit oriented developments help make the most of available urban land while enabling more compact and accessible communities, improving local services and increasing housing diversity and affordability.''

Cr Newman said population growth was a challenge for South East Queensland but that Council was committed to working with the State Government to help address the issue.

"This planning work will help Brisbane City Council achieve the 156,000 new dwellings target set out in the State Government's South East Queensland Regional Plan," Cr Newman said.

"We're looking forward to working cooperatively with the State Government to deliver this exemplar TOD project."

In December 2009, Premier Anna Bligh announced the joint State/Council partnership to progress the Yeerongpilly site. The Department of Primary Industries site is opposite the Yeerongpilly Railway Station and within walking distance of the State Tennis Centre and Mirvac's Tennyson Reach development.

The proximity of the site to the station, and other public transport facilities, makes it a suitable TOD development. The proposal will improve accessibility for the surrounding community to local services and public transport.

The development, bordered by Fairfield Rd, King Arthur Tce and Tennyson Memorial Ave, is expected to include a small commercial area to provide services currently missing in the region.

To provide safe and convenient access to public transport, the State Government has committed to extending an existing pedestrian footbridge to cross Fairfield Road by 2011 to be completed before the project opens to residents.

Tenders to prepare a plan of development for the 14ha State-owned site closed on May 7. The successful applicant is expected to be shortlisted by early June and a plan of development is scheduled for completion by the end of 2010. Dwelling numbers, building heights and other layout details are to be formalised through the design and consultation process.

Community consultation will begin in coming months to give residents an opportunity to learn about the proposed TOD and get involved in the planning process.

Feedback from the community representatives and other participants at the recent Queensland Growth Management Summit indicated that the redevelopment of key urban sites like this one at Yeerongpilly will be fundamental to creating a vibrant Brisbane for the future. Improved access to amenities and the improvement of the local open space available for public use will improve the liveability of the area not just for the new residents but for the surrounding community.

South Bank is an example of a successful TOD. For more information visit www.dip.qld.gov.au/TOD

==============================================================
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Offline Golliwog

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2010, 06:43:57 PM »
Quote
To provide safe and convenient access to public transport, the State Government has committed to extending an existing pedestrian footbridge to cross Fairfield Road by 2011 to be completed before the project opens to residents.
I know someone who works at the DPI site there, and they would have loved this bridge to be built earlier. As it stands now, to get to the station which is across the road, they either have to play chicken, or walk for something like 5-10 minutes up the road to a set of traffic lights and then back again. Still, at least its getting done.
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Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #29 on: May 13, 2010, 03:14:04 AM »
From the Courier Mail click here!

First transit housing plan speeds up with development at Yeerongpilly

Quote
First transit housing plan speeds up with development at Yeerongpilly

    * by Sarah Vogler
    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * May 12, 2010 7:30PM

HOMES could be built within two years at what the State Government hopes will be one of the first successful transit-oriented developments at Yeerongpilly on Brisbane's southside.

The development style was mooted as the answer to Brisbane's population growth woes, but so far an attempt at Milton has created a resident backlash.

Others planned for Bowen Hills and Woolloongabba have yet to get off the ground.

State Planning Minister Stirling Hinchliffe said the Yeerongpilly development was different, with the State Government and Brisbane City Council working together to see it through.

Tenders for development of the 14ha block of land, a former Department of Primary Industries site, closed last week.

Brisbane Lord Mayor Campbell Newman said it was hoped parcels of land, for a mix of high, low and medium density housing, would be made available to the public early next year.

"What we are trying to do here is work together co-operatively to progress the idea of TOD," he said.

"We are trying to re-make the urban form of Brisbane and the greater Brisbane area so we can actually get people in and make new, exciting, wonderful communities. We can get more people on public transport and also provide a quality lifestyle."

Mr Hinchliffe said working with the city council was the best way to make TODs successful.

Instead of attempting to build over a railway line on the site, the Yeerongpilly development will be built beside the Yeerongpilly station in Fairfield Rd.

Two heritage buildings on the site will be retained and it was expected the high-density portion would be no higher than 12 storeys.

Mr Hinchliffe said while the height might match other developments in the area, the price of units and homes in the new development would not.

"It is certainly not about emulating the higher end offer that is there in places like Tennyson Reach," he said.

"We need to have the person who works in the coffee shop . . . to be able to live there."

Cr Newman said it was hoped the development would give people on average incomes the chance to buy near the city.

The community is yet to have its say on the development but Cr Newman said council would hear their concerns.
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Online ozbob

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #30 on: May 13, 2010, 06:13:41 AM »
From the Brisbanetimes click here!

The TOD that turns the tide?

Quote
The TOD that turns the tide?
MARISSA CALLIGEROS AND TONY MOORE
May 13, 2010 - 5:52AM
After several false starts, Brisbane is finally set to get its first TOD.

Transport Oriented Developments, high-rise residential projects built on public transport corridors, allow high-density living where residents could catch the train, bus or simply walk to live, work and play.

But, so far, no TODs have got out of the starting block - until TOD Tennyson was launched yesterday.
An artist's impression of the proposed footbridge.

An artist's impression of the proposed footbridge.

A month ago, Brisbane Lord Mayor Campbell Newman told a two-day population growth session it was essential Brisbane got a TOD to work.

"That is a vision that many in the industry know that we have been talking about, but we have nothing that we can really show the community at the present time," Cr Newman pleaded on March 31.

He told that seminar that TOD development could be "sensitively accelerated" in partnership with the State Government.

Queensland's Infrastructure Minister Stirling Hinchliffe wants the same thing.

Last month, he "called in" a $250 million TOD at Milton to allow his department to assess Brisbane City Council's planning procedures, as local residents circled to complain about that particular TOD project.

"The regional plan identifies the importance of additional residential redevelopment in well-located urban areas to meet Brisbane's infill dwelling targets," Mr Hinchliffe said

"The delivery of TODs is a key policy if we are to meet these targets."

The pair met yesterday to launch TOD Tennyson.

The 14 hectare state government research station next to the Tennyson Tennis Centre will be sold by the end of 2011, after a design comes out of a community consultation phase which will start later this year. Cr Newman said TOD Tennyson was a new approach.

"Transit-oriented development hasn't quite got up in the last few years ... because there was a bit of a blind alleyway where people thought they had to build over railway lines," he said.

"Two or three years was lost in pursuit of that, [before] it was realised it was too expensive and difficult to do."

Cr Newman said the Yeerongpilly TOD was not likely to be higher than 12 storeys like the apartment complex at nearby Tennyson Reach.

Mr Hinchliffe said the houses and units in the new development would be geared towards middle-level income earners, like teachers, nurses and emergency services workers.

"This will demonstrate how you can have a blend between the high-density living that is already in place on Tennyson Reach through to the more traditional tin and timber communities that aren't far away," he said.

The existing pedestrian bridge over the Fairfield Road to the train station would also be extended.

In the past two years, TODs approved for Milton, Indooroopilly, Albion and Buranda stalled with the global financial crisis.
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Offline Golliwog

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2010, 04:37:56 PM »
http://www.translink.com.au/yeerongpillyoverpass.php
Quote
Start July/ August 2010
Finish December 2010

.........

What's involved in the project?
•a new bridge across Fairfield Road
•new stairs and lift to the station from the western side of Fairfield Road
•removal of the stairs on the eastern side (station side) of Fairfield Road after construction
•lighting improvements on existing footbridge
•pedestrian footpaths linking to new developments and the Queensland Tennis Centre and Fairfield Road.
•associated works to redirect in-ground services, such as electricity.

Great news that this is getting started almost immediately. I don't quite get why they see the need to remove the stairs to the eastern side of Fairfield Rd after they put the bridge all the way across though.
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Offline #Metro

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2010, 05:21:08 PM »
Does anyone else think the costs always seem wildly inflated  ???
$8 million for a footbridge!
Surely a more reasonable cost would be $1-2 million....
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Offline Golliwog

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2010, 05:42:06 PM »
It depends. Cheaper can be good, but more expensive hopefully means they are building the bridge to last for a long time.
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somebody

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2010, 05:44:13 PM »
I don't quite get why they see the need to remove the stairs to the eastern side of Fairfield Rd after they put the bridge all the way across though.
My theory would be to discourage people from walking across the road.  There is no reason why you would want to use those stairs once there are stairs to the other side of the road.

I agree about it being expensive.

Jon Bryant

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #35 on: May 27, 2010, 06:37:49 PM »
If TODs are to be successful then our roads need to be safe for pedestrians abd cyclists.  Building foot bridges over roads to separate cars and pedestrians only encourages the cars to drive faster.  Such footbridges are in compatible with TOD design principles of safe, friendly walkable streets.  Plazas and shopfronts are the way to go not separation of people and cars.

Offline Golliwog

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #36 on: May 27, 2010, 06:40:33 PM »
One could argue that Fairfield Rd isn't part of the TOD, its just the boundary. And exactly as you say, the principle is about safe and walkable streets, not roads.
There is no silver bullet… but there is silver buckshot.
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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #37 on: May 27, 2010, 07:20:09 PM »
In a TOD the transit stop is the central focus not on the edge.  We need to slow down our roads and stop them being to sole domain of the motor vehicle. 

somebody

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #38 on: May 27, 2010, 08:56:09 PM »
If TODs are to be successful then our roads need to be safe for pedestrians abd cyclists.  Building foot bridges over roads to separate cars and pedestrians only encourages the cars to drive faster.  Such footbridges are in compatible with TOD design principles of safe, friendly walkable streets.  Plazas and shopfronts are the way to go not separation of people and cars.
Are you saying here that you have a problem with the principle of building a pedestrian bridge across the road??

EDIT: Also getting to the Tennis Centre is made much easier by this bridge.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2010, 08:17:52 AM by somebody »

Offline dwb

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Re: TODs (Transit Oriented Developments)
« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2010, 10:20:28 PM »
I get you Jonno and I don't think you're raving mad, in fact I rather agree with you.

However, ped bridges can be good in some spots, particularly as to exit the station you need a grade change, no?

 

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