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Author Topic: Shaping SEQ  (Read 3092 times)

Online ozbob

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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2016, 02:58:42 PM »
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2016, 03:00:43 PM »
This ' Shaping SEQ ' has been in process a while now [ > http://railbotforum.org/mbs/index.php?topic=12404.msg178606#msg178606 ]

Guess it is case of looking to do something ..
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2016, 05:52:22 PM »
Didn't have time to go through the whole report in detail, but some initial thoughts:

- Where is bus reform? Reforms should be looked at every 10 years, this written into law and should not be delegated to an operator.

- Where is the Brisbane Metro?

- Housing density minimums could be a problem - if it is not profitable, the development might not take place and thus the lot left empty.

- SEQ TOD zoning around all busway, CityCat and train stations - also absent.

These are large omissions.
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Offline Marshal

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2016, 05:57:22 PM »
Just flicking through, doesn't seem to really add anything that wasn't already in the previous regional plan. No real new ideas, existing ideas from previous plans not really advanced. Seems all very redundant.

Just the regular update passed off as big news

Offline Old Northern Road

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2016, 06:25:19 PM »
The only transport project that is mentioned is CRR

Offline SteelPan

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2016, 02:35:36 PM »
SEQ 2025
SEQ 2030
SEQ, The Way Forward
SEQ, The New Way Forward
SEQ, Toward a Better Tomorrow
SEQ, A Better New Way Forward
SEQ, A New & Better Way Forward
SEQ, A New & Better Way Forward....Toward Tomorrow
SEQ, 2035, A Sustainable Way forward
SEQ, A New, Better, Sustainable Way Forward
SEQ, A Better Way, to a Sustainable Future For All
SEQ, Sustainable Ways to a Sustainable Future, by Moving Forward Sustainably
SEQ, Sustainable Ways to a Sustainable Future, by Moving Forward Sustainably....for All!
SEQ, Sustainable Ways to a Sustainable Future, by Moving Forward Sustainably....for All Queensanders!
SEQ, Sustainably Sourced Sustainability, for a Sustainable Future
SEQ, The Future, Sustainably Toward Tomorrow and 2035
SEQ, We've Got a Sustainable Plan
SEQ, We've Got Sustainable Plan...for the Future
SEQ, the Planning for the Future Continues.....
SEQ, the Planning for the Future Continues.....Sustainably.....

Coming Soon......More Plans....for the Future....Sustainably........

  :bna:

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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2016, 05:06:23 PM »
>> http://www.dilgp.qld.gov.au/noindex/shapingseq/draft-south-east-queensland-regional-plan.pdf
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2016, 12:42:25 PM »
Brisbanetimes --> The future of south-east Queensland in five charts
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2016, 03:25:28 PM »
Re Jobs Even the USA is struggling to create 10million new jobs and their population is over 350 million

Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2016, 03:56:50 PM »
Lots of ' wishin' and hopin' ' going on .. not much ' deliverin' '  :P

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Offline City Designer

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2016, 10:46:46 PM »
http://www.shapingseq.com.au/ShapingSEQ/documents

Background paper number 3 has a frequent public transport network schematic for 2031 on page 31.

Lots of corridors planned for upgrading to 15 minutes or better frequency.

Some are recognisable including routes 105, 175, 220, 230, 250, 270, 300, 306, 308 (part of), 327 (part of), 335, 338 (part of), 359, 369, 522, 550, 560, 590, 605, 610, 615, 620, 660, 680, 690, 710, 720, 730, 747, and 760.

Note it is not government policy, food for thought though.

Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2016, 07:33:02 AM »
Brisbanetimes --> State and council trade blows over South-East Queensland Regional Plan

Quote
A stoush between Brisbane City Council and the state government over planning for south-east Queensland is heating up.

Lord Mayor Graham Quirk this week sent a letter to Brisbane residents calling on the Queensland government to deliver "critically needed transport and social infrastructure for our suburbs".

"Without more investment in public transport, roads, schools and green space, the liveability of our city is at risk," Cr Quirk wrote.

Cr Quirk said the draft South-East Queensland Regional Plan set the council a target of approving more than 223,000 new homes over 30 years to keep up with the city's growing population.

"To meet this target, the rate at which new homes are being built in Brisbane will have to increase by almost 50 per cent," he said.

But Planning Minister Jackie Trad hit back, labelling Cr Quirk's mailout an "absurd political stunt".

"I am deeply disappointed that Brisbane City Council has wasted thousands of ratepayer dollars on an absurd political stunt when they should be focusing on their own responsibilities of delivering local roads, green space and infrastructure," she said.

Ms Trad said she ensured the process of developing the draft South-East Queensland Regional Plan had unprecedented levels of engagement.

"Every south-east council was involved every step of the way," she said.

Ms Trad said council received contributions from developers to deliver adequate infrastructure.

"Brisbane City Council must stop shirking their fundamental responsibilities because frankly, Brisbane residents deserve better," she said.

Question time in City Hall on Tuesday was dominated by criticisms of the plan by Liberal National Party councillors.

City planning chairman Julian Simmonds moved a motion on Tuesday night highlighting the council's concerns with achieving the targets set out in the draft South-East Queensland Regional Plan 2011-2041.

In his motion, Cr Simmonds claimed there would be an almost 50 per cent increase in new homes for Brisbane, "94 per cent of which could only be delivered through redevelopment of existing properties".

It also called on the state government to amend the 2016 State Infrastructure Plan to ensure the population increases foreshadowed were commensurate with infrastructure delivery commitments that would provide public transport, roads, schools and green space.

Labor opposition leader Peter Cumming labelled the motion a "political stunt".

"This council must take responsibility for their own poor planning," he said.

The motion passed. The ALP councillors and independent Councillor Nicole Johnston supported points A and C that council note the release of the draft plan and encouraged residents to have their say.

Points B - that highlights its concerns with the targets in the plan - and D - that council calls on the state government to amend the Infrastructure Plan to match infrastructure delivery with population increase forecasts - resulted in Cr Sri not voting, most ALP councillors had left but the remaining two abstained. Cr Johnston voted with the LNP in supporting the motion.

Ms Trad wrote a letter to Cr Quirk on Tuesday about the motion.

"At no point throughout this process were concerns raised by either yourself, Cr Simmonds or council officers about the proposed benchmarks or the infill/greenfield split ofr the Brisbane local government," she wrote.

"I also note that you were quoted in the media... stating that the plan would not be the end of backyards in Brisbane."

Ms Trad said evidence suggested the council was "well on track" to achieve infill targets and the current rate of approval was more than adequate to meet forecasts.

"Given this, it is irresponsible for you to suggest that council is required to increase the rate in which new homes are being built in Brisbane by almost 50 per cent," she wrote.

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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2016, 08:13:36 AM »
Sent to all outlets:

16th November 2016

Re: State and council trade blows over South-East Queensland Regional Plan

Greetings,

Lord Mayor Graham Quirk is quoted in today's Brisbane Times calling for more money for infrastructure from the State Government.

Similarly, the State Government itself is calling for more money for infrastructure from the Federal Government.

Nobody has yet thought to call for more money for infrastructure from the United Nations.

Council and State are both hoping that the next level up will pay for the things they should be paying for.

Does Lord Mayor Graham Quirk or Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk not realise that they have taxation powers? Or that the Queensland Government sits on assets that could be sold, leased or borrowed against?

That's how NSW is building Sydney's new metro. And it's how Victoria is removing 50 level crossings.

Lord Mayor Graham Quirk says 223 000 homes need to be built in Brisbane over the next 30 years.

Did you know that more than twenty busway stations and eighty train stations are within Brisbane City Council's boundaries? Fact.

The Lord Mayor could easily accommodate such growth by introducing a dedicated Transit-Oriented Zoning into Brisbane's City Plan.

Housing developers would hold the right to build more densely around Brisbane's 100+ transit stations. More people also means more rates revenue for Council.

Our position paper details how this can be done:

Position Paper ­ Transit Oriented Development Zoning --> http://backontrack.org/docs/tod/RBoT_TODSep16.pdf

Blame is the avoidance of responsibility. Elected politicians are elected to act. History has shown that politicians who do not act are quickly removed from public office.

Best wishes,
Robert

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Reference:

State and council trade blows over South-East Queensland Regional Plan
http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/state-and-council-trade-blows-over-southeast-queensland-regional-plan-20161115-gspyx6.html
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Offline Marshal

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2016, 04:27:41 PM »
I sometimes wonder what they are doing all day. Seems they dedicate so much time to passing the blame on to the other side of politics. God knows what they would do if we had council and state govs from the same party

Need much more pragmatism right now. Even a bit of busy work, like a station upgrade program, would go a long way to restoring faith the these governments can actually get things done, maybe even build up some confidence to take on real projects

Offline #Metro

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2016, 05:04:07 PM »
Quote
I sometimes wonder what they are doing all day. Seems they dedicate so much time to passing the blame on to the other side of politics. God knows what they would do if we had council and state govs from the same party

Probably being spent on consultants, lawyers, public relations and making video producers rich.

They did well out of CRR. Three videos so far.  >:D
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2016, 09:46:37 AM »
Couriermail --> Brisbane City Council letter on SEQ Regional Plan renews row with Queensland Government

Quote
BRISBANE Lord Mayor Graham Quirk spent nearly $300,000 to print and distribute a letter to residents about the draft South East Queensland Regional Plan, a move Local Government and Planning Minister Jackie Trad has branded a “political stunt”.

The Courier-Mail can reveal the letter, which was distributed to 380,000 Brisbane households this week, cost $276,480 to print and deliver.

Ms Trad, who will likely come face-to-face with Cr Quirk today at a South East Queensland Council of Mayors Meeting, slammed the letter as politically motivated.

“I will leave it to the people of Brisbane to hold council accountable for their actions,” she said yesterday.

“This was a complete waste of ratepayers money and nothing more than a political stunt by Graham Quirk.”

City Planning Chairman Julian Simmonds defended the issuing of the letter, saying feedback indicated local residents had been unaware of the potential impacts of the draft plan.

“This was a targeted communication method to raise awareness among Brisbane residents of the rate of development the State Government is proposing in its draft SEQ Regional Plan and the need to protect our city’s livability through commensurate infrastructure investment,” Cr Simmonds said.

“We know Brisbane residents care and want to have their say over the future of our city but at a community event this week it was very clear that local residents only became aware of what was proposed in the SEQ Regional Plan as a result of the Lord Mayor’s letter.

“The State Government should be embracing rather than avoiding the discussion with our community about appropriate growth and infrastructure and that’s why the letter encourages residents to have their say and provides details on how to lodge a submission between now and 3 March 2017.”

Property Council Queensland executive director Chris Mountford said the government needed to help councils achieve targets in the plan.

“Given the plan’s emphasis on infill development, the State Government will need to offer strong support to local governments over contentious infill projects,” he said.

Mr Mountfor said the government needed to priorities a provision in the plan to adopt a transparent program to provide data on new housing.

“The debate in recent days has clearly shown the importance plugging this gap,” he said.

“Solid data on new housing across southeast Queensland, that is openly and regularly reported, will undoubtedly assist in sound decision making and in depoliticising what is a very important document for the long-term planning for the region.”
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Offline SteelPan

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #17 on: November 29, 2016, 06:57:23 PM »
1) Enhanced inner-city corridor [CRR] [CRR ph 2/3....also needed but let's focus on Ph1 for now]

> without CRR, expansion on the network will create more problems than likely solutions.  CRR is a decade+ behind schedule - plus about 30yrs I'd personally argue.

2) HighER Speed corridors: [trains exist, it's the corridors that let them down]

> Brisbane CBD to Beenleigh
> Brisbane to Toowoomba - so glaringly obvious as to be embarrassing
> Sunshine Coast Line
> Springfield - next stage
+
> Some form of what I call "NorthLinx" - that northern corridor will quickly face congestion issues.

The above can easily all be delivered by 2025. The above would add billions to the productivity and tourism experience of SEQ!

 :ttp:
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2016, 07:55:58 PM »

I would like to see ETCS rolled out and perhaps trains made automatic between stations. I think that would generate a lot of benefits.

I would also increase off-peak train frequencies. Makes sense now that we have a large cohort of drivers and guards going through the

system. That would allow an increase in frequencies on the Shorncliffe, MBRL, Ipswich and Springfield lines.

What happens to CRR is up to fate. Current lot are probably not going to survive the election.
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2016, 02:38:40 PM »
Brisbanetimes --> ShapingSEQ regional plan gives 'stakeholders' a bigger say than citizens

Quote
Special interest groups have had much more influence than the wider community on the new regional plan for south-east Queensland. A draft of the plan, ShapingSEQ, was recently released for comment. Prior input from the wider community was limited to submitting "thought bubbles" about the region without having the benefit of any report card on how the previous plan had performed.

This process did not accurately gauge community concerns and submitters were not a representative sample. Perhaps it gave people the feeling they'd "had a say". The process just as likely reinforced cynicism about government consultation. ...

My only comment is that Government policies are increasingly ' thought bubbles '  ...  :bo
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2017, 05:29:33 PM »
Couriermail --> As population keeps growing, Brisbane needs to urgently plan infrastructure for the future

Quote
INCREASINGLY we are seeing the need for a new approach to infrastructure, as city sustainability and livability is put under pressure due to legacy approaches.

Brisbane, like many other major Australian cities, finds itself at a critical juncture in terms of its development.

Approximately half of Queensland’s population currently lives in the state’s capital. This is expected to rise by about a third in the next 25 years.

Brisbane’s public transport is mainly radial in nature, which does little to improve congestion and is relatively inefficient in coping with Brisbane’s sprawling landscape. Pic: Jack Tran

This pace of population growth places enormous pressure on existing infrastructure and means urban planners and policy makers need to reassess current infrastructure strategies to ensure the city remains viable in the long-term.

If Brisbane is to manage future population pressures and its effect as the city continues to grow, there are a number of key considerations that need to be looked at as a matter of urgency.

City strategists need to adopt a polycentric – more than one business centre – approach to Brisbane’s development and planning.

Brisbane’s rapid population growth and preference for low-density housing has pushed people out from city centres.

As a result, suburbs have continued to expand, with Brisbanites living further from central business districts.

While this might be an issue in the short term, it creates an opportunity to create new economic centres.

Clever polycentric hub strategies are about bringing the economic centre to the people, rather than making the people travel to a core CBD.

To be truly effective, these cores will be connected via multiple modes of transport, which will bring activities, business, people and amenities closer together, improving overall quality of life.

Consolidating in this manner is more sustainable and more economical and leads to healthier environments and communities.

This is similar in concept to the Federal Coalition’s smart cities plan, specifically the 30-minute city concept, whereby residents can access daily and essential activities within half an hour.

For Brisbane to continue to develop and thrive as a global city, a bigger picture approach to transport planning is key. It needs mobility oriented development.

Brisbane should look to design transport hubs with people and value capture as the first priority.

This will focus on the flow of public and private transport across greater suburban Brisbane rather than just the CBD and also allow governments to capture better return from their assets.

As it currently stands, Brisbane’s public transport is mainly radial in nature, which does little to improve congestion and is relatively inefficient in coping with the city’s sprawling landscape.

Planners need to think beyond current modes of transport and instead seek to establish different methods that will complement one another.

This is especially important in a rapidly densifying city such as the Queensland capital.

Public transport projects such as Cross River Rail and Brisbane Metro, are essential investments if we hope to significantly improve ease of movement around the city and its limits.

Varied transport hubs will decrease congestion along a number of key transport corridors, making it easier for individuals who have to travel longer distances to and from work.

Not only will this provide them with more efficient and a greater choice of transport options, but it will also most likely reduce the need for single private transport options on our roads.

When it comes to mass transit, Brisbane needs to think big and seriously commit to planning and investing now, as opposed to sparingly responding to issues as they emerge, with short-term solutions.

Ultimately, this will mean short-term pain, but will result in far greater outcomes in the long-term.

There’s still a considerable amount of strategic work the city needs to do about future planning to address integrated planning and urban mobility.

Australians, and Brisbanites in particular, have a long history of suburban living and have always enjoyed the idea of single family dwellings on large blocks of land with private backyards.

But the city needs a cultural shift and a definite change in approach if it is to successfully move towards a more sustainable model.

While the concepts of 30-minute cities, polycentric development and higher density living may result in short-term inconvenience, they will ultimately put Brisbane on the right path to becoming a global city and improve the quality of life for future Queenslanders.

Greg Steele is CEO of Arcadis Australia Pacific, board member of Roads Australia and chairman of Engineering Aid Australia.
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2017, 05:50:29 PM »
I have heard of the ' polycentric ' concept for decades now.

We already have this in Brisbane, but the CBD still dominates.

Ipswich
Springfield (completely new town centre)
Beenleigh
Cleveland/Manly
Shorncliffe
Chermside

Main thing is the zoning around these precincts - there are single family homes, and if you want decent office blocks, you will have to rezone (NIMBY trigger).

London has a satellite setup, with many 'garden cities' orbiting the main London city centre.
It works, but so does every other setup, so I doubt if it has a clear advantage or benefit over other options. Canberra too is
setup along these lines.

Planners keep talking about value capture, but they are trying to transplant a US concept into an Australian context.
Land value is already captured in council rates, and introducing value capture would be simple as removing the residential homeowner exemption from land tax (watch politicians run the other way).

Quote
Consolidating in this manner is more sustainable and more economical and leads to healthier environments and communities.
This is motherhood nonsense, I have not seen any conclusive hard evidence that it is one way or another. It also gives too much weight to physical planning determining social outcomes. Planning can only go so far. Ignores policy settings etc.


Quote
This is similar in concept to the Federal Coalition’s smart cities plan, specifically the 30-minute city concept, whereby residents can access daily and essential activities within half an hour.

30 minute city is nonsense, most cities already meet this criterion, so it is a ' no-effort-to-achieve ' metric.


Quote
When it comes to mass transit, Brisbane needs to think big and seriously commit to planning and investing now, as opposed to sparingly responding to issues as they emerge, with short-term solutions.

Ultimately, this will mean short-term pain, but will result in far greater outcomes in the long-term.

We do need CRR and Brisbane Metro, and it is the politics that has frustrated that process. But attacking ' short term thinking ' is also completely misguided. The BUZ concept was 'short term thinking' and it has been the most fantastic thing for the city. Bus reform, which is cost neutral and requires no new infrastructure would be a game changer. Bus lanes and traffic priority would be
easy, low hanging fruit type goals, as would closing the Victoria Bridge to cars.

Such an attack on ' short term solutions ' is completely unwarranted and is just repeating dogmas - reality is we need both kinds of
thinking to solve the overall issues.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2017, 06:05:05 PM by @Metro »
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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2017, 07:01:43 PM »
I have heard of the ' polycentric ' concept for decades now.

We already have this in Brisbane, but the CBD still dominates.

Ipswich
Springfield (completely new town centre)
Beenleigh
Cleveland/Manly
Shorncliffe
Chermside

Main thing is the zoning around these precincts - there are single family homes, and if you want decent office blocks, you will have to rezone (NIMBY trigger).

London has a satellite setup, with many 'garden cities' orbiting the main London city centre.
It works, but so does every other setup, so I doubt if it has a clear advantage or benefit over other options. Canberra too is
setup along these lines.

Planners keep talking about value capture, but they are trying to transplant a US concept into an Australian context.
Land value is already captured in council rates, and introducing value capture would be simple as removing the residential homeowner exemption from land tax (watch politicians run the other way).

Quote
Consolidating in this manner is more sustainable and more economical and leads to healthier environments and communities.
This is motherhood nonsense, I have not seen any conclusive hard evidence that it is one way or another. It also gives too much weight to physical planning determining social outcomes. Planning can only go so far. Ignores policy settings etc.


Quote
This is similar in concept to the Federal Coalition’s smart cities plan, specifically the 30-minute city concept, whereby residents can access daily and essential activities within half an hour.

30 minute city is nonsense, most cities already meet this criterion, so it is a ' no-effort-to-achieve ' metric.


Quote
When it comes to mass transit, Brisbane needs to think big and seriously commit to planning and investing now, as opposed to sparingly responding to issues as they emerge, with short-term solutions.

Ultimately, this will mean short-term pain, but will result in far greater outcomes in the long-term.

We do need CRR and Brisbane Metro, and it is the politics that has frustrated that process. But attacking ' short term thinking ' is also completely misguided. The BUZ concept was 'short term thinking' and it has been the most fantastic thing for the city. Bus reform, which is cost neutral and requires no new infrastructure would be a game changer. Bus lanes and traffic priority would be
easy, low hanging fruit type goals, as would closing the Victoria Bridge to cars.

Such an attack on ' short term solutions ' is completely unwarranted and is just repeating dogmas - reality is we need both kinds of
thinking to solve the overall issues.
Priority approach for Transkink Buses from Noosa to Coolangatta and in other regional hubs can be a start. If there is guaranteed ontime running and shorter journey times people may switch from cars to buses at peak?

Offline SteelPan

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2017, 03:35:00 AM »
Infrastructure Pipeline Report

OMG   :-r  LOOK Everyone...it's an infrastructure report............

 :pfy:
If urban rail was a sports stadium - there'd be a station on every corner!  Keep it LOUD for Pro-Rail!  :pr

Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2017, 05:17:40 PM »
Posted on behalf of a member:

What’s happened to the objective of “Connecting SEQ 2031”?

We may no longer be hoping to be connected by 2031, but the paradigm has switched to “Shaping SEQ”.

http://www.dilgp.qld.gov.au/noindex/shapingseq/draft-south-east-queensland-regional-plan.pdf

The focus has moved forward to 2066.

Check out the regional vision for 2066 on page 23.  The “connect” section on page 24 is a good read.

Those clever governments are now casting forward 40 years to sell us snake oil vision statements that will require them to do basically nothing for the next 3 terms while touting the “vision splendid” for 2066 !
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #25 on: May 15, 2017, 06:22:45 PM »
The political establishment, as it is, has failed rather spectacularly in Queensland.  Other jurisdictions seem be doing a little better.

More clap-trap visions and plans is just not going anywhere in the end.

What happened to the Newman grand vision?  Was even legislated .. the Queensland Plan ..

>>

https://www.queenslandplan.qld.gov.au/



 :fp: :clp: :frs:
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2017, 06:34:52 PM »
#FleeQld go west ...

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Offline verbatim9

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #27 on: May 15, 2017, 07:34:31 PM »
The Qld plan will be proceeded with a new Labor plan? Hopefully include better things with PT and also include Daylight Saving

Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2017, 04:17:20 PM »
11th August 2017

Media Release
Deputy Premier, Minister for Transport and Minister for Infrastructure and Planning
The Honourable Jackie Trad

South East Queenslanders shape region’s future

The South East Queensland Regional Plan (also known as ShapingSEQ) released today reflects the values, needs and great ideas of the community.

Deputy Premier and Minister for Infrastructure and Planning Jackie Trad said the plan was prepared through extensive consultation with the region’s 12 councils, industry and the community.

“This unprecedented level of consultation over 15 months ensured we have a blueprint for the region – a blueprint for sustainable growth, global competitiveness and high-quality living,” Ms Trad said.

“The consultation resulted in a phenomenal contribution from the community with over 3300 submissions, more than 85 percent of these from private individuals.

“For the first time, we now have a plan for SEQ that includes a 50-year vision which looks to the region's longer-term future.

“This new plan shapes the way we will grow, prosper, connect, sustain and live, as the region grows to around 5.3 million people over the next 25 years.

“This growth will require approximately 950,000 new jobs and an almost 800,000 new dwellings across SEQ by 2041.

“Planning to accommodate and manage this growth required new thinking – a smarter approach, and a new focus on where and how we’ll live.

“There is a focus on affordable living and the way people interact with their community and the services around them.

“By 2041 our urban centres will be more connected and mixed use. Our communities will be more active, and the areas in which we live will provide more housing choice and diversity, including a broader range of 'missing middle' housing forms.”

Council of Mayors (SEQ) Chair Cr Graham Quirk welcomed the consultative approach by the Queensland Government in the development of the South East Queensland Regional Plan.

"Regional collaboration is one of the many strengths of South East Queensland, so it’s fitting to see the region’s councils and communities playing a strong role in this process,” Cr Quirk said.

“The Council of Mayors (SEQ) remains committed to working in collaboration with the Queensland Government to ensure the successful implementation of the South East Queensland Regional Plan.”

Ms Trad said ShapingSEQ has also identified Regional Economic Clusters and region shaping infrastructure to support economic growth and to ensure SEQ has all the right ingredients to operate and compete globally and to provide for more local jobs. 

“New communities that are well-located will also be delivered - and this will mean greater housing choice, smart infrastructure investment, and jobs through attracting investment.

“The Queensland Government is also establishing a South East Queensland Housing Supply Expert Panel to ensure that housing needs will keep pace with estimated growth, as part of a $5 million investment in land supply monitoring.”

You can view ShapingSEQ at http://www.shapingseq.com.au

ENDS
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Online ozbob

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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #29 on: August 12, 2017, 01:25:38 PM »
https://twitter.com/QldPlanning/status/895866954128400386
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Re: Shaping SEQ
« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2017, 05:32:17 PM »
Did someone day "plan"?

 

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