Queensland UTC +10
Terms of use Privacy About us Media Contact

Links

Author Topic: The 2016 Census  (Read 809 times)

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
The 2016 Census
« on: July 25, 2016, 08:56:39 AM »
http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/mediareleasesbyReleaseDate/247F0127852AB4ABCA257FF70080BDC7?OpenDocument

The 2016 Census: Making a difference to all of Australia

August 9 2016 will be the Australia’s 17th national Census of Population and Housing. It’s our moment to pause and make a difference.

For more than 105-years, the Census has been the centre of the Australian story, fully and accurately recording our nation’s development while enabling fact-based debate and evidence based policy making.

The Census guides Government funding for essential services and infrastructure and is crucial in setting electoral boundaries, allocating Australian Government funding to states and territories, planning educational and health services and other infrastructure for local communities. The Census informs all levels of government, business, academia and media, and Australians who want to learn the characteristics of towns and cities before buying a home or considering a new job – among many other uses.

By participating, as Australians have willingly and even eagerly done, we help shape our country’s future.

As Australian Statistician, I proudly lead the Australian Bureau of Statistics through the 2016 Census, and am excited to sit down with my family on August 9 to record our characteristics. I urge everyone in Australia to join me and share in the excitement of this once-in-a-five year opportunity. Australians have no cause for concern about any aspect of this Census, and can have ongoing trust and confidence in the ABS.

The ABS has made a number of major changes to the 2016 Census to make it easier, cheaper, more relevant and more valuable to our rapidly growing and changing population, society and economy.

We’ve gone digital and expect two-thirds of Australians to complete the Census on their smartphones, tablets, laptops or desktops, wherever they are on Census night. This saves $100m for taxpayers, making the nation’s largest peacetime logistical operation significantly more efficient and enabling earlier release of Census data.

We continue to collect names, as we have done in previous Censuses, in order to produce accurate population numbers and better estimate Indigenous life expectancy. In 2016, I’ve decided to keep names and addresses for longer. This is for statistical purposes only, and will increase the value of Census data. This will enable the ABS to produce statistics on important economic and social areas such as educational outcomes, and measuring outcomes for migrants. Names and addresses will be permanently destroyed by August 2020.

My decision followed community consultation, direct engagement with the Australian Information Commissioner and each State and Territory Privacy Commissioner, and a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA). The ABS has transparently communicated its process and decisions every step of the way. We advertised our PIA process in the national media in November 2015 and received few responses.

Names and addresses are specified in the Census Regulations as Statistical Information, like all other Census topics, which must be collected. Names have always been critical to ensuring the accuracy of the Census. The requirement for all topics, including names and address, on the Census forms to be filled completely and accurately is consistent with 105 years of Australian Census practice, the Census and Statistics Act 1905 and legal advice to the ABS from the Australian Government Solicitor, who has the legal expertise I rely upon. The only exception is religion, which the legislation specifies is optional.

There are extremely robust safeguards in place to protect the privacy and confidentiality of the information collected in the Census, including names and addresses. After data collection and processing, the ABS removes names and addresses from other personal and household information, stores them securely and separately from one another, and other Census information. They will never be recombined. This is a new capability for the ABS, and a new security feature that protects the community, introduced over the past decade.

The ABS never has and never will release identifiable Census data. This is set out not only in our legislation, but is ingrained in our organisational culture, just as filling in the Census is ingrained in our national culture. Please play your part on August 9 – your information will make a difference.

David W. Kalisch
Australian Statistician
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: The 2016 Census
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2016, 08:57:42 AM »
Census of Population and Housing

August 9 is Census night. Our moment to pause and make a difference

>> http://abs.gov.au/census
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline aldonius

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1085
Re: The 2016 Census
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2016, 07:54:06 PM »
Pretty sure (but don't quote me on this) the change about putting your name down on the census is unenforceable. As in, release of the data in order to prosecute would in itself be illegal.

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: The 2016 Census
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2016, 04:59:24 PM »
http://statements.qld.gov.au/Statement/2016/7/27/queenslanders-urged-to-join-the-count-on-census-night

Media Statements
Treasurer, Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships and Minister for Sport
The Honourable Curtis Pitt
Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Queenslanders urged to join The Count on Census night

Treasurer Curtis Pitt is urging all Queenslanders to make sure they’re counted in the nationwide Census on Tuesday 9 August.

Mr Pitt said the State Government was mounting a public information campaign starting this week urging all Queenslanders to ensure they’re counted in the Census.

“The campaign includes TV, online, and radio ads featuring Sesame Street’s popular Count von Count to make sure everyone in our state knows that we’re counting on them to complete their Census,” he said.

“Because federal funds are often distributed on a per capita basis, every Queenslander who is not counted on 9 August potentially costs our state an estimated $5,300,” Mr Pitt said.

“In the 2011 Census the undercount of Queensland’s total population was estimated at 1.8% or around 77,200 people which is similar to the population of the Rockhampton Regional Council.

“This could be worth around $400 million to Queensland if we don’t make everyone count.

“An accurate Census count helps every level of government plan and deliver services and infrastructure where they are needed.”

Mr Pitt said as Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships he was especially urging Indigenous Queenslanders to ensure they were counted in the Census.

“In 2011, the Queensland undercount of people who identify as being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin was 16.8 per cent or an estimated 31,400 people,” he said.

“The Palaszczuk Government is committed to closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in health, education, employment and economic opportunity.

“But to do that we need accurate Census data to help build a complete picture of our communities.”

Mr Pitt said the Census on 9 August was run by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and aimed to count all people in Australia including close to two million Queensland dwellings and almost five million Queenslanders.

“The information collected as part of the national Census provides a snapshot of Queensland’s people – where we live, what we do, and how we live,” he said.

“Knowing how many people call Queensland home will help us get our fair share of federal government funding.

“Understanding where Queenslanders live will make sure our infrastructure and services are developed where they are needed.

“Queensland businesses, governments and communities use Census data to build a picture of our regions and communities and better respond to changes in our population.

“The information is valuable in making informed planning decisions about housing, transport, education, industry, hospitals and the environment.”

Mr Pitt said this year the ABS was planning for more than 65 per cent of households to complete their Census online.

From 1 August, households will receive a letter from the ABS with a unique Census login, and instructions on how to complete the Census online. Paper forms will still be available to households that require them.

For more information visit http://www.treasury.qld.gov.au/census
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: The 2016 Census
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2016, 04:01:07 PM »
I just completed the census online.   

>> https://stream10.census.abs.gov.au/eCensusWeb/welcome.jsp#top2
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: The 2016 Census
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2016, 02:37:26 AM »
You didn't have to be Nostradamus hey?


Brisbanetimes --> Census 2016: Error messages hinder completion of online census

Quote
As an estimated 16 million people logged on to the census website on Tuesday night, they were met with error messages and told the system was "overloaded" before the website crashed.

At 8pm on Tuesday evening, when accessing the census website brought up an error message or a blank page, hundreds of angry people contacted Fairfax Media to detail how they spent upwards of half an hour filling in the online form before their data was lost when the website went down. ...

« Last Edit: August 10, 2016, 03:38:22 AM by ozbob »
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 74034
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: The 2016 Census
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2016, 10:39:38 AM »

« Last Edit: August 14, 2016, 11:02:46 AM by ozbob »
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


“You can't understand a city without using its public transportation system.” -- Erol Ozan