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Author Topic: Tilt Train  (Read 2436 times)

Offline #Metro

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Tilt Train
« on: April 16, 2016, 03:46:31 AM »
I have been searching for the cost of making a Tilt Train. Queensland Auditor General seems to have some info on it.

Quote
DTMR and QR consultants respectively reported that a reasonable cost per carriage would be $5.39 million and $6 million. The contract price was within 3% and 14% of these benchmarks respectively and, as such represented reasonable value for money, given the July 2010 benchmark was based on carriages manufactured overseas.

https://www.qao.qld.gov.au/files/file/Reports%20and%20publications/Reports%20to%20Parliament%202014-15/RtP8TraveltrainrenewalSunlander14.pdf (Page 24)

This suggests that one six-car train is around $36 million each? That seems like a reasonable ball park for something decked out for long distance.

« Last Edit: April 16, 2016, 06:49:32 PM by LD Transit »
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Offline petey3801

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Re: Tilt Train Cost
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2016, 10:33:07 AM »
NB: That would be for a Diesel tilt train though. Unsure how much different an electric tilt train would be.
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Tilt Train Cost
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2016, 05:20:59 PM »
This is true. But I think it would be ballpark. Probably cheaper if it did not have the frills and the order was larger.

There is actually very little public information on the electric tilt train specifications. Perhaps this is because there is only 1 2.

« Last Edit: April 16, 2016, 06:57:38 PM by LD Transit »
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Online ozbob

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Re: Tilt Train Cost
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2016, 05:41:27 PM »
There are two ETTs. 
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Offline #Metro

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Re: Tilt Train
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2016, 06:56:54 PM »

It would be interesting to know how electric tilts speed up and slow down.

Rough values I could come up with were (could be wrong):

Acceleration   0.69   m/s2
Deceleration   0.8   m/s2

This implies that it would take around 1432 m to accelerate from zero to 160 km/hour (64 seconds - just over a minute) and around 1235

m to decelerate from 160 km/hour to a complete stop (56 seconds - just under a minute). Do these sound about right? They seem a little

low, but perhaps these are 'padded' with safety margins etc.

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Offline petey3801

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Re: Tilt Train
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2016, 08:16:45 PM »
All good, just wasn't sure whether you knew it was for the diesel. Figures for the ETT probably wouldn't be overly helpful due to the time since they were built, prices would have fluctuated significantly and technology has come a long way as well.

Can't speak for whether those figures are correct or not. The accel figure looks roughly correct, possibly a little bit high, but would be pretty close to the money. I believe the 100 series IMUs are 0.68m/s2, which was to make them feel a bit more like the ICE, more gentle take off, also geared for higher speed. I recall also hearing the decell rate was reduced so that in the event that the ATP caused an emergency application, it wouldn't do as much (possible) harm if anyone was standing/walking at the time. Whether that is true or not, I have absolutely no idea though.
Also, I have a feeling published decel figures are empty train in emergency braking, so best/fastest braking possible, which isn't used in regular service (obviously), so regular braking rate would be lower than the spec rate (not 100% sure if this is the case, but I think it is).
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