Queensland UTC +10
Terms of use Privacy About us Media Contact

Links

Author Topic: Southern & Western Railway History.  (Read 2795 times)

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Southern & Western Railway History.
« on: April 04, 2016, 05:13:16 PM »
Hello All,
My first post. I've been researching my Ancestry which has led me to our great country from Scotland. My Ancestors like many of you may have out there were hired by Peto, Betts & Brassey to work on the first Qld Railway lines. They missed the initial line from Ipswich to Grandchester but arrived in time for the 2nd to Murphy's Creek and then up the range to Toowoomba. I would love to hear from anyone who have similar stories and information about these men and women who followed the rails relentlessly across the Southern & Western lines.

I'm currently looking at the Goodna line which was completed in 1875. My GG-Grandfather also worked on this line and I'd love to get some more information about it. Anyone with any pictures of the Railway station back then would be nice to see but more importantly is, is it still in it's same position? With all the flooding and even burnt down at one stage is it likely the same spot?. Also does anyone know what happened to Railway street that I've seen mentioned on Trove it doesn't exist anymore. Logically it was near the Station but which side? and is it now called Woogaroo St.? Also the RSL club has two addresses now. Was the original down on Brisbane Terrace or next to the Station?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I've seen a few Station photos on here but they don't look early enough.
Thanks.

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2016, 05:48:44 PM »
Welcome!  Goodna railway station is in the same location as the original.  There was a yard etc. once and the old bridge across Layard St  for the track into the yard was removed only a year or two ago now. The old station masters house is next to Goodna Station.  I suspect Railway Street was possibly obliterated when the Ipswich Highway was put through ( on the St Ives side ). There once was a daily workers train to Ipswich workshops from Goodna.  This was stabled overnight at Goodna.

Goodna railway station has an oddity.  The platform numbering is the reverse of the normal numbering on Queensland Rail.  The UP track is platform 2 and the down track is platform 1.  I have asked Queensland Rail why this is, and they haven't been able to come up with a reason.  My theory is that the original station had one platform face (towards the river).  When they opened up another platform it would have been reasonable at the time to keep the original platform as one, and the new one (St Ives side as 2).

The RSL as far as I know has always been in the location near the station.  The facility on Brisbane Terrace is a function centre.  It is possible that might have been the site of the first RSL club.  You would best to ask Goodna RSL.  Early Goodna life was centred on Brisbane Terrace to a degree.  The Royal Mail hotel was a stage coach change point prior to the railway opening.  The Royal Mail Hotel is where the official party retired to for  ' refreshments ' after the official sod turning for the construction of the railway Ipswich - Brisbane.  Goodna was chosen for the sod turning because Ipswich and Brisbane couldn't agree to allowing it at either Ipswich or Brisbane, so Goodna was chosen as roughly midway.

Our local Councillor at Goodna, Paul Tully is bit of a history buff.   You could email him (just google him) and he might have more information. 
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2016, 06:15:33 PM »
With respect to the reverse numbering of Goodna (and Riverview) platforms.

I have received some advice that the numbering may be related to when the station was rebuilt.  I went look for some evidence of a possible different early station layout.

I found this image taken in 1928, it shows an island platform.  So I await further advice.



Article identifier
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21295402
Page identifier
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page1741977
APA citation
    ALONG THE IPSWICH LINE. (1928, June 9). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864-1933), p. 13. Retrieved July 11, 2011, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21295402


Note: ==> http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/home  Historic Australian Newswpapers is a great resource ..
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2016, 06:17:22 PM »
John Oxley Library

Goodna 1956,  station can be seen

New road at Goodna on the left,with the old one to the right



http://hdl.handle.net/10462/deriv/3652
Record number: 123738


^ This is an interesting pic as it shows the SM house (still there today) and street layout river side.  Still the same.  This sort of supports that Railway Street was obliterated when the new road ( today's highway was put through).
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 06:29:21 PM by ozbob »
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2016, 06:25:23 PM »


Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2016, 07:46:05 PM »
I have found some more information. The function centre is on the site of the former Railway Hotel. This closed c. 1960. RSL set up on this site initially and then relocated to present site near station later.  Do not know when exactly.
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2016, 10:41:38 AM »
Thanks Ozbob for your reply and valuable information. I contacted the RSL by email a few weeks ago and still no reply. I've contacted the Ipswich Railway museum a week ago for information and still no reply. I even contacted the Royal Mail Hotel several times and no reply. Not even a sorry can't help, don't know, too busy to help get lost reply. I guess that's what they are saying by not replying.

I have been trying to get records of my GG-Grandfather's employment for a timeline of his movements around the different areas where he worked and lived which has led me to the Goodna line. He arrived in Brisbane on the sailing ship The Light of Age as a Railway platelayer from Scotland in 1866 along with about 500 other passengers most of whom were workers hired to work for the Qld Gov Railway's and their Contractors. The voyage over is a story for another day with a drunken Captain and a crew that some of which ended up in prison.

The first mention I found of him was he was at Fountain's Camp Murphy's Creek, named after the Contractor of that stage Mr.Fountain. I've visited the site where the camp was and where over 500 workers lived and there are a few headstones in a very small Cemetery and an open field full of bindi-eye prickles which managed to do their worst to me in my open toed Qld summer footwear. The visit was short.  The next place he worked was further up the line at Ballard's Camp named after the Engineer in charge of the build up the Range and I found that out by getting my G-Grandfathers BC which said born at Ballard's Camp 1867. These camps were like little moving suburbs. They had a church, a butcher, a baker, fresh vegetables supplied from nearby towns and pubs and sly grog huts and they even had children born in them.

Which brings me to Goodna - Ipswich [not in chronological order]. I found evidence of his employment with S @ W Railway where he was employed as a labourer in the Loco Dept., @ 6s 6p per day and worked Bris-Ipswich 1873-1876. Then to my utter dismay I found in Trove one day a reference to a sexual attack in Goodna on a young girl not yet 10yrs with the same name as one of his daughter's. I thought this can't be true. This has to be someone else. The date was right for her to be nearly 10yrs. I contacted the State Archives to see if they had any information to confirm if it was her. They searched the archives and found the transcript from the actual court case in 1874. I asked if there was any mention of this child's mother [Mary] or her father [John].

I couldn't wait for the answer and a few day's later they rang me and said the only mention of a parent was her mother ... MARY!! This is now sounding like it could be them. Right area, right age and right time. I had to get it. They said it will take time to restore as the pages are very fragile, some tattered and some even dusty and if I wanted it restored it will take maybe 6 months and expensive. OH NO!!! I want it NOW!!! Can you speed it up please? ... No. The document is a 142 years old and fragile. It'll take time. Ok then I'll just have to wait. Damn!!! Well it wasn't quite 6 months when it arrived but it felt like a year or more. I couldn't think of anything else.

When it finally arrived I just stared at it. I was too scared to open it and I made a cup of coffee and still, just stared at it. Stupid right? Yes! I hear you say.
Well I wanted it to be her, I wanted to hear her speak. I wanted to hear her mother Mary speak, these are my GG-Ancestors and their voices from 142 years ago. At the same time I didn't want it to be her and to have gone through such an ordeal at any age let alone at a tender 10yro. I finally put my big boy pants on and opened it. As I started to read it, well sort of read it as it was almost impossible to read. The hand writing was virtually illegible scrawl. What the heck am I going to do. I could make out maybe 40% of it and tried to guess the rest.

Then I thought maybe this is the stenographer's piece? I frantically skipped through all theses pages and then BOOM! suddenly a different coloured paper and beautiful old longhand writing appeared and it was legible. I barely remember drawing breath as I read the court case of a darling little innocent girl running an errand for her mother 142 years ago and was followed home by a creepy low life called Charles Hillman alias Carl Hillman. She must have been so scared. Her mother confirmed to me that it was indeed my GG-Grandmother and GG-Aunty when she stated her birth date and presented in evidence her BC. It was all now real and true.

They gave in evidence their address as Sandy Flat on the Brisbane road Brisbane side of Goodna. I can't find the name 'Sandy Flat' anywhere on any old maps or literature today but I assume it was probably between the Woogaroo bridge and Gailes golf club on the river side. She stated that Charles Hillman followed her across the Woogaroo bridge and started to catch up to her and called out to her to stop after the bridge. I can feel her terror even today.

*** More to follow about Mr.Hillman's capture & comeuppance and Goodna.












Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2016, 10:56:04 AM »
Some interesting history there, albeit tinged with a bit of sadness.

This is from the Goodna RSL Document for the function centre


Quote
The Frank McGreevy Function Centre
Built in 2009, the Frank McGreevy Function Centre is Goodna Services Club’s best option to host your
special event.

Frank McGreevy was the founder of the Goodna RSL, which originally stood on the ground which
now stands the Frank McGreevy Function Centre. The original building on this site was the Railway
Hotel, which looked similar to the Royal Mail down the road. The liquor licence was transferred
to the Weeroona Hotel in the early 1960’s, and the Railway Hotel was demolished and another
building erected in it’s place. After some time, this then became the Goodna RSL, until recent years
when they erected a new building adjacent to the Goodna Railway Station. The old RSL was then
demolished and the function centre consequently built.

Frank McGreevy was a decorated soldier in World War 2, and after the war worked as a nurse in the
Repatriation Section of Wolston Park Hospital - now known as The Park - Centre for Mental Health.
Franks picture is painted on the sound barrier near the Henry Ellerton Bridge - Ipswich bound service
road, (near Bertha Street intersection), along with many other service personnel.

From > http://goodnaservicesclub.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/GOODNA-FUNCTION-PACKAGE-NO-PRICES.pdf
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2016, 12:14:36 PM »
Thanks Ozbob for the Goodna RSL information!. Logic told me beside the Station and common sense said on Brisbane Terrace. I now firmly believe that the Goodna township started on the Brisbane Terrace and grew up around it until the first big flood in 1864. It may have convinced some people to move to higher ground but not all. However back then it didn't affect a lot of people as Goodna's population didn't reach 500 residents until 1888. Goodna was actually called Woogaroo and in 1865 was declared a village. Now 1865 leads me directly to when the Police museum told me that the first appearance of a  Police station was in Goodna. They couldn't tell me where however. Wow. It's whereabouts has been lost and no records exist today.

I was looking for this information as part of my research into the sexual attack on Jane the 10yro child of Mary and John. I needed to know where these places were that are mentioned in the Court documents. What was her path home, where was she living? Where was her mother who sent her on this errand? I think that it was a stroke of luck that this man was caught. Maybe I'm wrong and it was good Police work. Well it certainly was by Constable Hunter who was not long into his patrol on horseback when he was riding down the Brisbane road near Sandy Flat when he heard screaming coming from a Humpy he had passed earlier. He rode back and saw a man coming from the back of the Humpy and ordered him to stand, which he did. He asked the man what he was doing at the Humpy and replied he was asking for some food.

He noticed the man's trousers were unbuttoned and told him to accompany him back to the Humpy which he did. On arrival at the Humpy there were other children and mother Mary had also arrived home and young Jane was there crying. When asked did she know this man she said yes and he had treated her in a 'ruffian' manner and had hit her with his closed fist after which she fainted. I need not say anymore other than Charles Hillman was sentenced to 10yrs servitude at St.Helena Moreton Island. I even searched for his record and found it.

I have since found out a little more as to where the Police Station may have been and the Police museum have it a little wrong maybe when they said 1865. I found again in Trove that in 1863 there was one sergeant and one constable there in 1863. Also a big hint again from Trove that the Police Station suffered substantial damage in the flood of 1864 because 'it was in the hollow of the township'. It's current position was again a move or two from other floods since. So it certainly looks like it was initially on or near the Brisbane Terrace.

So I'm now looking for where it was and also Sandy Flat.
*** More to follow about the errand Jane was on and where she went.



Offline curator49

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 129
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2016, 02:49:23 PM »
I am currently off work sick, As there are only two of us at The Workshops Rail Museum who can respond to you (and that means only one at present) it will take a little time for a response. We have a lot of work to do with only a very small staff and much higher priorities for the Museum, but we do the best we can. Although we try to acknowledge as early/quickly as we can sometimes that is not possible. I am responding to this from home because I care.

David Mewes
Curator
The Workshops Rail Museum

Offline curator49

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 129
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2016, 03:03:50 PM »
BTW, I just checked my Inbox at the Museum which tells me I received your e-mail in my Inbox at 9:22 am Monday 4 April - that is yesterday - hardly a week ago.

Further to your enquiry about your ancestor. I will send you details (when I get back to work) as to how to ascertain details IF the person eventually worked for the railways. Those working for contractors such as Peto, Brassey & Betts did not work for the railways they worked for the contractors and were paid by them. The person may have gained employment in the railways at a later date however.

Meanwhile thank you to OzBob who has responded to your request with some valuable and helpful information you have been seeking.

Regards
David Mewes

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2016, 03:38:22 PM »
At noon on Friday, 4 Sept 1874, Jane's mother Mary, asked her daughter to go to Mr.Drysdale's Hotel and get 'a quart of beer'. Amazing! who would have guessed my GG-Grandmother loved a beer or two and maybe more back then. She lived to 90yrs and she died of heat stoke poor dear. Evidence from all the witnesses state that the humpy was about 1¼ miles to 1½ miles from Goodna township. So they lived in a humpy at about that distance on Sandy Flat. She was walking to the 'Royal Mail Hotel' I found out [Mr.Drysdale's]. No mention of the hotel's name just the Publican. Obviously no under age service laws back in the day, she was 9¾yrs then, bought the quart of beer and headed home. Cold beer back then? would have been hot by the time she got home anyway if there was. My niece's are about her age & a bit older now asked me, 'Did they have Wi Fi back then?'. I said 'they didn't even have cars back then. Doesn't sound like a very nice place then.' HHmmmm ... I'm worried about those girls.

So I found where she went to and left from. The current position of that hotel is not where it was back in the day. I have since found that it was approx. 200m further to the east towards Brisbane and nearer to the then Woogaroo bridge where she became aware of being followed. That bridge back then didn't even have hand or safety rails and it was a good 15ft drop to the creek bed. For a little girl of 10yrs that was a big walk there and back even without a 'quart of beer'. The attack upon her was recorded as being about 2 o'clock or just before.

There are some very interesting stories of the Publican's in Goodna back then. Goodna and Ipswich have a very interesting history back in the early days, one they all should be proud of. It is essentially where our great state in this great country all began. Ipswich was very nearly going to be the Capital and not Brisbane but I think Brisbane would have won out anyway. It was where the first Railway began which opened up the countryside and immigrants poured into Qld as we went ahead in leaps and bounds until an overseas recession was to take it's toll here. But that's another story for another day.

Back to the Publican's and firstly Mr. John Alexander Drysdale. He was the son of Irish immigrants, born in Sydney and came to Goodna and built the Royal Mail Hotel, not on it's current site, and applied for a liquor licence 19 Oct 1863. There is also an application listed in the paper on 18 March 1864. When did the first great flood happen? ... March 1864. How unlucky was that! He was virtually washed away before he started as he lived there as well. Obviously undeterred because he ran that establishment for many years [13] up until his death on the 13 Dec 1876. Just 18 months after Jane's trouble there. He was a wealthy man for back in the day as he owned all the land between Layard and Lowe streets that fronts the Brisbane Terrace and other land as well where his hotel was initially.

It was said that he was a jovial man but apparently one night he was in a fit of rage about something and had a stroke, collapsed and died in the Hotel. Was it news that after the Railway station opened there in 1875 that Cobb & Co closed up shop there as it was a place where they stopped changed horses etc. ? Maybe? But the story doesn't end there. On the way to Mr.Drysdale's funeral the undertaker conducting the funeral Mr. George Dowden, suddenly became alarmingly ill and stopped at another Hotel along the way known as 'Ross's Old Hotel' and asked for a glass of water, sat down and became quite delirious and unable to continue with the funeral. A buggy was quickly arranged and he was taken to the nearest Doctor but soon died of .... a stroke!!!

What are the chances of that happening? Obviously shorter than you think. His wife Eliza took over the licence of the Royal Mail and after a short stint put it up for sale or a 5yr lease. 17 April 1878 it first appeared in the papers.





Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2016, 04:07:57 PM »
Very interesting!

This was the road as it was in 1924.  Earlier it would have been just a dirt track.  Note the railway up on the left.

Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2016, 04:13:20 PM »
Earlier photograph

www.bonzle.com

1907
Horse and buggie crossing the bridge over the Woogaroo Creek, Goodna. Brisbane Terrace was the road to the Goodna Hospital, from the Goodna township. The bridge's replacement, the E. A. Richardson Bridge,

Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2016, 04:14:34 PM »
My apologies David,
I thought you were a much bigger concern than you are at the Workshop Museum and had many more staff.
I thought it was maybe Government run and or sponsored Museum. Don't take that as a criticism. I shoot off
emails quite often to anywhere I think that they may have some information that can help.

I don't know where the email sent date of the 4th yesterday came from as I have just checked in my sent box and trash box and I have 17 sent and received emails on that date none of which are to the Workshop Museum. Maybe that's the read time and date of the email? Least ways I apologise for any wrongful criticism you have felt. I'll remove my foot from my mouth myself.

My Regards.

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2016, 04:15:48 PM »


Title: Ready for the hunt, Goodna, Ipswich, ca. 1892 Location: Goodna, Ipswich, Queensland Date: ca. 1892 Creator: Unknown Description: Large group of horseriders and dogs gathered in front of a hotel at Goodna in readiness for a hunt. Original format: copy print : b&w Digital format: image/jpeg Publisher: John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland Image number: 19620 Digital ID: picqld-acr-0210--2003-11-18-15-20 Rights: This image is free of copyright restrictions.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:19620r_Ready_for_the_hunt_ca._1892_Goodna_Royal_Mail_Hotel.jpg
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2016, 06:08:38 AM »
Thanks for those pictures Ozbob. I had two of them but I didn't have that one of the bush track called the Brisbane road back then. Notice how they worked back then, not building the road up to a high level then the bridge over the creek but running the road down to the creek and making the bridge as short as possible. No wonder it was flooded so many times.

By 1907 the Woogaroo bridge finally had hand and safety rails. Quaint pic of horse and buggy going across it. I'm not positive but I don't think cars were in Qld until about 1908-10 period not long after that picture.

I have a photo of the Royal Mail Hotel taken 1905 with John Reilly the Publican's name on it. The hotel looks nearly identical. It may be a rebuild but I'll check.


RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2016, 07:28:41 AM »
Found some more information about the site occupied by the Frank McGreevy Function Centre.

I found a map of the area that's only dated 1973, that the total block of land bordered by Brisbane Terrace, George, Woogaroo and Peel streets was owned by E.T.McGreevy. Looks like he was Frank's son could be his daughter but no Miss or Mrs in front of the name. A small creek snaked it's way through the block and flowed down to the river and a small bridge crossed the creek over the road at the eastern end on Brisbane Terrace. It wasn't subdivided then it was section 13.

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2016, 08:44:16 AM »
My goodness!!!, how quickly things can change. Just had a look at a google map of the area now. Layard St. and only ½ of George still exist. Peel used to run parallel to Layard is totally gone but is now short and parallel to Woogaroo St. which is in the same place. If you run what's now Ryan Street all the way through to Brisbane Terrace that's exactly where Peel street used to be.

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2016, 02:57:04 PM »
Hi Ozbob, in reply to ► 'Goodna railway station has an oddity.'

I don't have an answer but I found an article on Trove when it was being done. It was written by a correspondent and it's a good upbeat assessment of the Goodna township back in 1886. It may narrow down a search period for you.


http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/4489888/88091

Copy and paste.

Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2016, 04:30:53 PM »
Thanks.  Interesting snapshot in 1886. So confirms line was single then duplicated, which probably fits my theory of platform numbering.  Considering that the Brisbane Tce side was the busy side at the time the line opened.

The Brisbane Courier Tue 6 Apr 1886 Page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/4489888/88091


« Last Edit: April 07, 2016, 04:40:02 PM by ozbob »
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2016, 05:07:18 PM »
My GG-Grandfather came here from Scotland where he worked as a Platelayer for the Scottish Caledonian Railway Co. He was one of 14 children and he and his wife had six before they had left Greenock in 1865 but one had died and Jane being just 15 months when they arrived. It was said that it was a good healthy voyage 'only 10 deaths' occurring and all were infants. How lucky they must have been as John & Mary came with 5 infants.

They went on to have a total of 11 children, but unhealthy ships were just the start of their problems. They came to a pristine country but the settlers still carried on their unhealthy ways. When you have a 1,000 workers and their families working and moving along the lines, sanitation is not very good to say the least, even though they were spread out over several camps. Even settlers in South Brisbane on the Thompson Estate relied on water from Norman creek for their daily use and culinary purposes, yet authorities failed to stop [for a long time] Mr.Crump a *butcher who had slaughter yards on Logan Road emptying into that creek. There was a manure depot on Sandy creek as well as a Tannery.  [*a Scottish Butcher was called a 'Flesher'... creepy.]

A lot of Railway workers and family members died for these very reasons along the lines, which leads me to a child of my GG-Grandparents also called John. He is totally lost to history. He arrived here with them but there is no Death Certificate or Burial record for him anywhere in any state or territory. A Genealogist said that she had read a story about many deaths amongst Railway workers along the Northern Downs lines from Toowoomba right out to Mitchell-Charleville. So I started to investigate further.

I came across a reference to my GG-Grandfather working past Dalby in 1870 on the Western Line Northern Downs. It was only for a short time and things weren't bad there then. Then I found him mentioned in 1877-78-79 on the Chinchilla-Roma line and worst of all Paddy's Creek.!!! They were falling like flies so bad was the disease there. I found many horror stories about those places at that time on Trove especially Paddy's creek. His residence was S & W Line Paddy's Creek Northern Downs. WOW !!!

So this has to be what happened to his young son John. There is no other explanation. What happened to these people was that they were buried along the tracks or nearby in the bush in little mostly unmarked graves of stones and they moved on with their sorrows. I went out there just recently for a short holiday to my brother's place in Toowoomba and we decided to go further out to Miles etc., not to see if we could find anything because it would be long gone or disturbed. We went to see the Railway station at Roma as we do anywhere we go where there's a Railway, pulled into it in the morning and I went onto the platform and came across a painter and nobody else.

What I saw shocked and annoyed me!!! The night before some low life had tagged his graffiti everywhere and I mean everywhere. There wasn't a wooden panel, door or window that he missed. Even the old engines parked on the unused lines. I talked with this man firstly about how and what we would do to him if we caught them and then he told me about a site just outside Miles where there is a small roadside monument to the people who died along the Railway lines. Well that cheered me up no end. That was a million to one strike right there. I didn't suspect or even know about it. So we hastily drove off to see it. After 30mins or so I can't really remember, we actually drove past it and by a fair bit, so I hummed and haarred so I go back and have another look? Glad I did !!!

I'll post the photo's we took, just three. *** To follow shortly, I hope.

So I'm certainly not going to waste anymore time now looking for poor little John. I've been doing so for years. I know where he ended up and likely died.




RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2016, 05:33:59 PM »
Well I'm sorry they won't attach, file too large. Each of the three are too large? Hmmmm .... How to shrink them???.

Yes Ozbob. You guessed it right for sure. Well, carefully well thought out educated guess.:-))

« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 11:38:53 AM by RailwayFan »

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2016, 09:56:08 AM »
Photos have been reduced.

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2016, 10:06:22 AM »
This is the cross we missed and went back to.

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2016, 10:13:52 AM »
This is the plaque at the bottom of the cross.

It wasn't an easy place to find even though it was at the side of the road on the right hand side as we drove across to Miles.
It's not a big area nor were there any signs we saw to help.

I read one article about this place where they worked was that they were starting to
believe that what they were getting and dying from was because of what was in the soil.
Many workers and families left and progress was very slow on this extension.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2016, 10:19:33 AM by RailwayFan »

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #26 on: April 08, 2016, 02:55:12 PM »
Here is just one story of many I have about this unbelievable untold story of Queensland Railway History particular to the Western Railway Northern Downs.

It backs up the stories from the pictures above. What these workers and families had to endure to my a less than modest living.
The disease became an epidemic that swept through the camps. The last 2 lines back up what I said about earlier the belief the disease was coming from the soil. Read the 1st link first and then the second in order as they are apart of the same story from the report.


http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/1363640?searchTerm=%22PADDY%27S%20CREEK%22%20RAILWAY%20%22DISEASE%22&searchLimits=sortby=dateAsc|||l-state=Queensland

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/1363671?searchTerm=%22PADDY%27S%20CREEK%22%20RAILWAY%20%22DISEASE%22&searchLimits=sortby=dateAsc|||l-state=Queensland

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2016, 05:37:38 PM »
Does anyone know exactly [or close enough] where the old Goodna Dam was and also Pullen's Hill around Goodna?

Thanks.

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #28 on: April 14, 2016, 04:57:22 PM »
When I started looking for information about my Ancestors, I had very little to go on as to where they worked, lived or even came from. As a kid all these people come and go through your house, pat you on the head or pinch your cheek, you aren't told much or even remember what your told and everyone seems to be an Aunty or Uncle and they're all old!! .... yuk. Keep away from me!. Sometimes they came with other kids and they were called 'cousins', whatever!, I just wanted to play with them. Then they left and it was back to the neighbour's kids.

So I started looking with not a lot of details. Can't ask the parents they've passed as has most everyone else. Just my brother and I are left and we are both old like those other 'yukkie' old people. My Father worked all his life in the Railway as an engine driver finally, my brother was a shunter and had no other job and I worked as a Boilermaker in the Railway Workshops. I never knew my Grandfather as he died at 51yrs and he worked in the Railway also. So suddenly there's a common thread appearing.

I drove down to my brother's place one weekend for a visit and I told him that I've been doing some Ancestry on our tree and did he have anything of use and he went to this old box which had some old papers and photos and out popped an old hand drawn tree from the 1980's which he didn't know he had or anything about. Boom! It had names of people I've never heard of and it said that these people came from Scotland to work for the Qld Gov on the first Railways. Wow! I didn't know that! That's a good start!

I was searching in Trove one day and I came across an article titled 'The First Railway' and I immediately recognised the story and names. I was pumped as it even had the year they all arrived and the name of the ship. That was nearly 2 years ago now and I've been gathering information about them ever since which has led me to finding the awful story about Jane in Goodna.

Since then I started to get really interested in the area and it's history. Boy oh boy!, Goodna and Ipswich have a fantastic rich pioneering history. Some of those pioneers were great men and women back in the day and forged a great life for themselves and families. How they came back time and time again after some of those incredible floods is beyond me. They picked themselves up and went onwards again and again.

I have found information that isn't available from the Ipswich Council or a few Museums or Libraries around Brisbane. I have sent some of it to the Ipswich Council for them to look at and I have been in touch with the Qld Titles office for verification of actual site identification and ownership etc. I have put it all together on an old map and marked the places and dates etc.

I'll post it tomorrow morning after I give it one more check. I hope you will like it as it has some great unknown information and all verified.
Cheers.



RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2016, 09:53:26 AM »
The original file of Goodna - 1800's I tried to attach was too big so I've downsized it to fit the file requirements size. I hope it doesn't lose it's integrity.
If it appears too small and unable to read email me and I'll send the original as an attachment. Otherwise you may be able to download it into a viewer and enlarge it or simply keep pressing the ' ctrl ' key and the ' + ' key together and it will resize on the screen.

[1] The coloured allotments relate to land owned by different people in this particular area in this time frame. e.g. James Holmes in this period also purchased 640 acres of land elsewhere in Goodna @ £1.0.0 per acre.!!

[2] I contacted the Police Museum as to the whereabouts of the 'original' Police station and they said that those details have been lost to time but said there was a police presence in Goodna about 1865 on the 'Western bank of Woogaroo creek.' Well I found in Trove that the 'Goodna Police station was a one sergeant and a constable station in 1863'. Also that the station was destroyed in the 1864 flood and that it was situated 'in the hollow of the Township'.
Putting those 2 remarks together it is likely to be where I have indicated on either side of the road.

[3] In the literature of the area that I have read on the Council's website I didn't come across any reference to the 1st Hotel and accommodation building in Goodna and I found with the help of the Titles office that John Hanran built for James Holme's on his land 'The Coach and Horse's Hotel' in c1852. It's been reported back in the day that as many as 40-50 drays were 'parked' in the vicinity of that hotel. Later on Mr. Holmes built on that property a 2 roomed house, shed and a large Bakehouse and oven. The 1st publican of the Hotel was Daniel Young.

[4] The squares that I've placed representing buildings are indicative only and don't represent the size or position of them.

[5] I have read that the 'Royal Mail Hotel' was some 200m east of it's present site. According to the Titles office and an interview from another pioneer William James Reed who had the blacksmith's shop and later the publican of the Prince of Wales Hotel [which burnt to the ground] wife when 90yrs old said that the Royal Mail Hotel was always on the present site.

[6] John Drysdale bought the land marked in green in c1863 and then bought the land beside those blocks from John Hanran [in blue] who was a very wealthy land owner, builder and publican of the North Star Hotel in Ipswich. John Drysdale applied for a liquor licence in 1863 and built the Royal Mail Hotel and opened in 1864.

[7] I found the original site of the Railway Hotel !!. I don't know when it was built as yet. The owner bought the land [marked pink] in Layard Street allotments 14 & 4. The hotel was at the front and the back block was used for a variety uses including an Irish band that once played there. Also keeping and feeding horses.

Interestingly I found that a young boy of 7yrs was followed by an on duty policeman on 13 Feb 1891 after leaving the Railway Hotel carrying a bottle of beer. The policeman was standing on the Railway platform near the goods shed when he saw him. He observed Mrs. Sherry taking him inside and then she escorted him outside with the bottle and the boy then tried to take a different way home when he spotted the policemen. He was arrested and Mr. Sherry the publican was found guilty of serving a person under the age of 14yrs in the licencing act of 1885. He strenuously denied the charge and vigorously defended himself in court but to no avail. I mentioned that with reference back to Jane who was sent to Mr. Drysdale's for a quart of beer by her mother when 9yrs and 10 months in 1874 and I mentioned the under age liquor laws didn't exist. 11yrs later they certainly did.

[8] By now after the floods of possibly 1863, 1864, 1887, 1890 these buildings had been partially destroyed, destroyed and battered around quite a bit. The Royal Mail had been flooded almost the day it was opened on 2 April 1864. The 1864 flood was in March of that year!. The owner of the Railway hotel was Mr. James Clifford and he decided to build a 'New Railway Hotel' after being flooded yet again in 1890, and that's what he called it. He called for tenders and Mr.C.J.P.Huxtable was successful for £783 and 18 weeks build time. WOW! that's not long. From the reports I've read it was a spanking Hotel beautifully fitted out with different coloured timbers in the bar etc.

It was built where the current RSL is on the corner of Brisbane Terrace and Layard street allotment 6 on the map and I think he also had allotment 5 but I can't find where it is in my notes, and was opened on 29 Nov 1892. It was FLOODED with the water over the roof barely 3 months later in Feb 1893 the biggest flood ever recorded until then and probably since as there were no dams etc., regulating to hold back water then. How did they keep going on? rebuilding, cleaning, renovating etc.

Finally, there was a queue of people putting there hands up for the licence to run the New Railway Hotel but it was given to the current holder of the old Railway Hotel Mr.G.A.Sherry who was to be a leading light in the district supporting sports of all types and was instrumental in starting the Woogaroo races along with others like Mr.Drysdale etc., and later he became a big wheel in the cog of the Tattersall's Racing club in Brisbane.










Offline ozbob

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 76444
    • RAIL Back On Track
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2016, 10:26:29 AM »
^  Thanks.  Very interesting and well researched!

 :-t
Half baked projects, have long term consequences ...
  Bob's Blog

RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2016, 10:49:15 AM »
Thanks Ozbob.

That was not quite 2 weeks of fun. Time just flew. I love researching our history and the Railways. The Railways opened up every nation.
I've watched a few 'who do you think you are'? and there are several that I've seen almost exactly as mine and other's who came here.

If you get the chance watch the one with Jerry Hall, Murdoch's new girl. Her story is almost identical. Ancestors went to America from Scotland
to work on the building of the Railway's there except one of her Ancestors met and worked with Davey Crockett. The dangers of the Indians etc.

I still don't know where the Goodna Dam was. There are a lot of references to it and particularly fixing the damage done to it. As today no one
wanted to pay for it or band aid fix it over a long period. I know there was a road over it but which one? When there's only a small population
there's not many references to street names in the paper's which makes it difficult. e.g. The accident happened at Mr.Drysdale's Hotel or we
chased the foxes near the church and then onto Simpson's paddock then back past the Dam on then onto .... Grrrr ... :-) What was the street?
Everyone there knows.


RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #32 on: April 16, 2016, 04:10:08 PM »
After my Ancestors arrived in Moreton Bay as others before them, they were given fresh provisions first thing Thursday morning after arrival and then they were taken from the ship by the Government steamer 'Kate' and taken into Brisbane. It states that ' they speedily distributed themselves throughout all portions of the city, being easily distinguished by their [to colonial eyes] somewhat "outre" costume.' Looks as though they had their Sunday best on and it looked as though they stood out like a cocktail bar in the Sahara Desert. :-)

'In the evening many of them were inclined to be somewhat obstreperous at the depot and 2 or 3 fights took place. Fortunately a number of police were in attendance and nothing serious took place, although it was considered necessary that 2 constables should remain at the depot all night.' I'd like to think that GG-Grandfather wasn't involved, as he had his wife and 5 children with him but in Scotland before coming over, more than once he made the paper because he liked a knuckle sandwich.

This is another extract that made the Parliament and papers in May 1866. 'The change that has taken place in the character of the immigrants is shown by a return that has been laid before Parliament, which has reference to the 12 months ended 31st March last.' [that's when they landed in Moreton Bay]
It goes on to nominate all boats that arrived with badly behaved or not very well selected immigrants. e.g. 'The Monmorency - "well conducted but not very well selected." 'The Light of the Age - "badly conducted not very well selected."

My,my, my. 'Them's fightin' words'. My Ancestors have been bundled into this bagful of badly conducted, not very well selected immigrants. How dare they! Can we still sue for deformation? :-) Well they couldn't have been referring to my lot, because as it turns out, one of my G-Uncle's was in one of the first 3 boats that hit the shores together at Gallipoli at 4.30am on the 25 April 1914. He was in the Qld 9th Battalion AIF. He was wounded in a bayonet charge [crazy that] and sent firstly to Malta and then on to London. After he was healed enough he was sent to the Western Front!!, and in a letter home said 'he couldn't wait to strafe the Germans'. He may have been insane but certainly not well selected. If that wasn't bad enough he saddled back up and went to fight again in WW2. He didn't pass any of those genes on me I must say. I got the 'run for the hills' genes. :-)

Then his younger brother's William and Stewart joined as well in WW2. Stewart became a 'Rat of Tobruk'!!! and we've yet to find out what William did but in 1965 they named a street after him in Townsville where he enlisted. Maybe they're doing that for all who enlisted?, I don't know. All WW1 records have been digitised so you can go into the Government site and find and download their records. However that's not the case for the WW2 records. If you want them you have to pay to have them done. I think that is unfair to the families. They risked and gave their lives, the families, who are the only one's interested, need to be able to access them freely. I went to the War Museum in Canberra years ago and was able to obtain the record of my mother's brother who died on the Changi Railway. I personally made an enquiry about him and they mailed his record to me. I'm not certain if they do that now.






RailwayFan

  • Guest
Re: Southern & Western Railway History.
« Reply #33 on: April 17, 2016, 11:07:14 AM »
This is where they were housed on arrival. It's the Immigration depot William street Brisbane c 1868.
Beats being on the ship 'Light of the Age' with leaking water closets, wet bunks, the stench of sheep and pigs etc., I'll bet.

Throw into that mix a drunken Captain Porter and crew who were [crew] continually hanging around the single female and married quarters.
Gambling was also rife on the ship and reported by Dr. Harrison who was continually reporting on all other things about the cleanliness of decks,
water closets and drunkenness of the crew. On arrival he immediately asked for and got an Inquiry into the drunkenness of Captain & crew.


The inquiry was held a few weeks after arrival and witnesses examined, and in spite of some damning evidence Captain Porter was exonerated. The good
Doctor would have the last laugh however as Capt. Porter and crew members were later charged in Sydney for drunkenness by water police on a later voyage, and to top it all off Capt. Porter managed to run the Light of the Age ashore near Port Arlington in Port Phillip bay Victoria one night when he was so drunk that when water police came to the rescue he was unable to stand up and was carried off the ship. No one was killed or injured on ship, however when the salvage crew went to the ship to remove it from the shore, the divers who were operating out a 3 small boats, misplaced or used to big a charge of some dynamite and when it was set off the boats were blown out of the water resulting in 3 deaths. There are still some remains of the wreck today and divers still can find pieces of fine dinnerware which was part of the cargo.

Sounds like a script from a keystone cops movie but it's true.




 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


“You can't understand a city without using its public transportation system.” -- Erol Ozan