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Author Topic: NSW ACT Country & Freight Rail  (Read 2650 times)

Offline ozbob

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« on: March 29, 2016, 09:26:54 AM »
Daily Telegraph --> Country train stations will be left “unattended” as NSW Government cuts regional rail worker numbers

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AT least 10 train stations in NSW will be unmanned and another 20 forced to operate with fewer staff and shorter opening hours as part of a massive shake-up of the state’s rail system.

A review by NSW TrainLink, which runs regional and rural rail services, has raised concerns about the lack of ­security and shrinking customer service on trains to and from some of the state’s ­biggest regional towns.

Griffith, Byron Bay, Lismore, Broken Hill and ­Murwillumbah will all be closed, allowing passenger pick up and drop off only.

And up to 60 fulltime ­positions on stations will be cut due to a drop in face-to-face ticket sales, patronage levels and staff workloads.

In meetings with the Rail Tram and Bus Union last week, TrainLink management said it wanted to ­“modernise” regional services and at least 11 stations would be unmanned.

Staff were also advised the government wanted to close down the Broadmeadow Travel Centre in Newcastle and cut staff and opening hours at the Sydney Booking Office at Central.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 01:40:10 PM by ozbob »
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2016, 04:30:50 PM »
Canberratimes --> NSW TrainLink staff at regional railway stations, including Canberra, to be slashed
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Offline Gazza

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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2016, 08:39:08 PM »
You'd wonder why they haven't done this sooner, and just have a local newsagent selling tickets.

Byron bay station is dead when I've stuck my head in to have a look, so you just have someone paid to pick their fingernails.

Offline SurfRail

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« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2016, 10:15:16 PM »
^ I expect that by far the greatest number of travellers would be arriving on non NSW TrainLink services anyway.
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2016, 03:48:09 PM »
Rail Express --> Greens accuse NSW of not respecting regional transport
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Offline tazzer9

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« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2016, 07:39:16 PM »
Most people need to realise they are not closing the stations, just making them unmanned. 
It truly amazing how they even have staff at some places like the stops on the old murwillumbah branch.  Lismore is my personal favourite since the buses stop at the station and the tourist centre.

I do however question the reduction of staff at some stations.   It looks like a prelude to scrapping all trains and bussing everything.   

Grafton, Casino, Coffs harbour, goulburn, wauchope, cootamundra, armidale and bathurst are all fairly busy stations. 

Offline ozbob

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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2016, 02:39:33 PM »
Fixing Country Rail >> http://freight.transport.nsw.gov.au/network/rail/fixing-country-rail/index.html

Pilot program

On 1 April 2016, the NSW Government announced $15 million in funding for Fixing Country Rail pilot projects.

Projects funded under the Fixing Country Rail pilot could include sidings, passing loops, overtaking lanes, and network enhancements that all lead to the use of faster, longer and heavier trains.

Applications for Fixing Country Rail funding will be assessed in two phases: a call for Expressions of Interest followed by a call for Full Applications.

All Expressions of Interest will be reviewed by a Technical Panel and assessed by the Infrastructure NSW Regional Independent Assessment Panel, which will compile a shortlist of projects to go through to the Full Application phase.
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2016, 02:39:24 AM »
ABC News --> Regional communities relieved as NSW Government abandons plans to leave railway stations unstaffed

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The New South Wales Government says it has heard community concern about its plan to cut staff numbers at regional train stations.

Under a planned review that proposed to reduce customer service staff, eight stations were set to be unstaffed, which included Parkes, Broken Hill, Wellington, Griffith, Macksville, Yass Junction and Nambucca Heads.

Transport Minister Andrew Constance has abandoned the plans and said the eight affected stations would continue to be staffed to meet customers' needs.

The plan sparked concerns it would pose a safety risk to customers, and many community groups argued removing customer service staff would have a big impact on regional tourism. ...
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2016, 11:15:08 AM »
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2016, 02:45:29 PM »
FB Fix Country Rail --> https://www.facebook.com/fixcountryrail/posts/1141206765923073:0
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2016, 05:27:49 PM »
TfNSW Freight Fixing Country Rail

Pilot round: 2016-17

>> http://freight.transport.nsw.gov.au/network/rail/fixing-country-rail/index.html#
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2016, 10:02:46 AM »
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2016, 10:37:32 AM »
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2016, 10:37:26 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Freight limits imposed after defects found in Hawkesbury River rail bridge

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Limits are being imposed on freight trains running over the rail bridge connecting Sydney with the Central Coast and Newcastle, after engineering reports found cracking in the bridge's concrete and "consistent defects" in its steel frame.

A "load rating and fatigue assessment report" prepared for Sydney Trains in July and obtained by Fairfax Media recommends strengthening of the upper sections of the Hawkesbury River rail bridge.

The emergence of the report comes after the Labor opposition helped expose crumbling in one of the concrete piers of the bridge, as well as the initial failure of Sydney Trains to conduct recommended repairs.

Fairfax Media subsequently reported transport authorities did not know the strength or carrying capacity of about a quarter of the state's rail bridges – a fact Transport for NSW and Sydney Trains first tried to deny.

The latest report into the Hawkesbury River bridge, over which tens of thousands of people travel every day, examines the upper steel and concrete sections of the bridge.

The report, by engineering consultants SMEC, identifies defects through parts of the concrete, some of which indicate that "corrosion may have been initiated in some locations".
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2017, 03:38:30 AM »
Sydney Morning Herald --> Two-hour train ride between Canberra and Sydney on the cards



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Canberrans could be nipping up to Sydney in just two hours if a new high speed railway project gets the green light.

Executives from Spanish train-building company Talgo arrived in Canberra on Wednesday to discuss running their high speed passenger trains between the two cities.

Commercial director Guillermo Martinez told The Canberra Times the state of the art trains would halve the current four-hour rail journey between Canberra and Sydney.

The trains would run on the existing tracks between the two cities with little to no modification needed to railway infrastructure, he added.

"We have looked at the current track between Sydney and Canberra and it was not as bad as we thought," he said.

"There is no problem running our trains on the existing railway tracks.

"For us, this is one of the main reasons to put in our train set. Because we don't need to invest as much on the tracks."

The full proposal would cost less than $100 million, Mr Martinez said, with Talgo understood to be seeking contributions from governments in New South Wales and the ACT.

Mr Martinez said if the government committed to the project, Talgo would have the trains up and running in "12 months or less".

Talgo would also lend a demonstration train to Australia free of charge just to prove their technology worked before the government committed a cent.

"There would be no cost associated with the trial," Mr Martinez said.

"All of the initial cost for the trial would be borne by us."

The Indian government is currently running trials of Talgo trains between the cities of Mumbai and New Delhi.

In initial trials, conducted last September, the trains shaved more than four hours off the typical railway journey time of 16 hours.

Project manager Salvador Flores said the primary reason the trains travelled so fast was because they used a "tilting" system that allowed them to maintain speed on corners.

"Mainly it's the passive tilting system that allows the train to run faster. It's a difference in technology," he said.

Mr Martinez said it was too soon to tell exactly how quickly the units could travel on Australian tracks, although Talgo trains are capable of reaching speeds as fast as 200 kilometres per hour.

They would have a similar passenger capacity to the trains currently running on the Sydney to Canberra line, Mr Martinez added.

Fenner MP Dr Andrew Leigh is expected to meet with the Talgo delegation to discuss the project on Thursday.

"Although it is early days, Talgo's visit to Canberra highlights the range of affordable options available for the NSW government to shorten rail travel time between Sydney and Canberra," Dr Leigh said.

"The current journey of four hours puts the train behind the Canberra-Sydney bus line, but with a modest investment from the Berejiklian government, Talgo high-speed trains could make the trip in two hours and be competitive with air travel."

A public meeting has been organised to discuss the project on Thursday evening. It will begin at 6pm at 1 Balmain Crescent in Acton and will include presentations from Talgo representatives.
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2017, 12:41:04 PM »
Canberratimes --> Andrew Leigh urges NSW government to support Canberra to Sydney high-speed train

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Federal MP Dr Andrew Leigh is urging the NSW government to support a high-speed railway proposal between Canberra and Sydney.

The proposal, put forward by Spanish manufacturing company Talgo, could slash the rail travel time between the two cities from four hours to just two and a half hours.

In a letter to NSW Transport Minister Andrew Constance, Dr Leigh stressed the importance of improving rail links between Sydney and the nation's capital.

"As you are aware, the current train time from Sydney to Canberra takes around four hours - considerably longer than the time to drive," read the letter, obtained by Fairfax Media.

"Many in the Canberra community and along the train route have expressed to me their concern that this is disadvantaging those who would prefer to travel by train, and leading to additional congestion on the roads."

Executives from Talgo travelled to Canberra last week to discuss the project with Dr Leigh, the opposition spokesman for competition and productivity.

It is understood Talgo have also met with representatives from territory, state and federal governments, who have expressed some interest in the project.

Talgo have offered to lend Australia one of their trains free of charge in order to test the feasibility of the project.

Their trains would run on the existing tracks between the two cities with little to no modification needed to railway infrastructure.

"[Talgo] are confident that with their system, the journey time could be reduced from 4 hours to 2.5 hours," Dr Leigh wrote in his letter to Mr Constance.

"I wonder whether your government might consider this, and at least see what the Talgo train could do?"

The full proposal would cost less than $100 million and could be completed in 12 months or less, Talgo commercial director Guillermo Martinez told The Canberra Times.

The Indian government is currently running trials of Talgo trains between the cities of Mumbai and New Delhi, where they have shaved four hours off the typical journey time of 16 hours.

Talgo project manager Salvador Flores said the primary reason the trains travelled so fast was because they used a "tilting" system that allowed them to maintain speed on corners.

"Mainly it's the passive tilting system that allows the train to run faster. It's a difference in technology," he said.

Mr Martinez said it was too soon to tell exactly how quickly the units could travel on Australian tracks, although Talgo trains are capable of reaching speeds as fast as 200 kilometres per hour.

They would have a similar passenger capacity to the trains currently running on the Sydney to Canberra line, Mr Martinez added.

Last Thursday ANU Professor Clive Williams MG, who has no commercial interest in the initiative, organised a community meeting to discuss the proposal.

"We had about 100 people show up to the meeting, it went very well," he said.

"The attendance was a mix of people who were just interested in the proposal, and those who were ex-railway employees.

"There was a lot of support for it. Now it's just a matter of building up momentum."

The Canberra Times has contacted the NSW government for comment.
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2017, 04:51:55 PM »
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2017, 08:55:45 AM »
News report of XPT v. Car at a LX Kyogle.  Initial reports suggest XPT off the rails.

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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #18 on: June 14, 2017, 09:02:21 AM »
News report of XPT v. Car at a LX Kyogle.  Initial reports suggest XPT off the rails.

Northern Star --> Car hit by train at Kyogle

Quote

EMERGENCY services were called to a Kyogle rail crossing at 8.10am where a train has collided with a car near the Kyogle CBD.

A NSW Ambulance media spokeswoman said the car was occupied.

Paramedics and police are at the scene now on the corner of Andrews St and Yongurra Rd, Kyogle.

UPDATE 9am: EMERGENCY services have converged at a devastating scene at Kyogle this morning where a car carrying single driver has been struck by a high speed XPT service.

It's unknown whether any passengers of the train were injured.

A Fire and Rescue NSW spokesman said the Kyogle Fire Rescue unit was called to the scene and arrived at 8.20am.

State Emergency Service and Rural Fire Service units are also in attendance alongside police and paramedics.

UPDATE 9.15am: A WOMAN has been killed after the car she was driving was hit by a southbound XPT passenger train service just after 8am this morning at a rural train crossing, NSW Police have confirmed.

The driver of the train has been transported to hospital in shock, while passengers of the train appear to be uninjured, a spokeswoman said.

The woman also had a dog in her car which has been badly injured and may not survive.

Emergency services are currently working at the devastating scene on the corner of Andrew St and Yongurra St south of the Kyogle CBD.

UPDATE 9.39am: POLICE media have released a statement about a fatal train crash at Kyogle.

Police are at the scene of a crash between a passenger train and a car at Kyogle, in the state's north.

About 8.10am (Wednesday 14 June 2017) a white Holden Commodore was hit by a train at a road crossing near Summerland Way and Andrew Street.

A 60-year-old female driving the vehicle died at the scene. A dog in the car was injured and was euthanized by a vet.

The train driver and approximately 33 passengers on board the train were not injured.

Police from Richmond Local Area Command are investigating the circumstances surrounding the crash and are appealing for anyone who witnessed the incident and is yet to give a statement to come forward.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2017, 09:48:03 AM by ozbob »
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2017, 09:28:19 AM »
Andrews St and Yongurra Rd, Kyogle

LX, open with STOP signs.

https://www.google.com.au/maps/uv?pb=!1s0x6b90af654b550e09%3A0xf131b630f4ec2ea&hl=en-AU
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Offline ozbob

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« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2017, 04:49:06 PM »
https://twitter.com/7NewsQueensland/status/874880673290571776
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« Reply #21 on: July 24, 2017, 01:39:43 PM »
ABC News --> Why does the Sydney-Canberra train stop in Kingston and not the CBD?

Quote
Most capital cities have a train station in the middle of town — that was almost the case for Canberra.

This week's question comes from Beck Pearse, an academic who lived in Canberra's north.

Beck travelled regularly between Canberra and Sydney by bus.

"Given that the train is four-and-a-half hours and only runs two times a day, adding the trip over to Kingston just makes it an untenable journey for me," she said.

It made her wonder why Canberra's train station wasn't more centrally located.

And like many Curious Canberrans who get in touch, Beck had done some of her own research.

"We found out that there actually was a station in Civic at one point or there was a plan for it?"

Many of you have asked about the rumoured Civic station, and after you voted for Beck's question in June we managed to find proof of its existence.

The train station in Kingston was never meant to be Canberra's main, or only, station.

"The original use of the railway line was not as a passenger line," said David Flannery, Chair of the ACT Heritage Council.

"It was to bring goods, particularly building materials, in for the early construction of the city and to bring coal to the [Kingston] Powerhouse."

The railway line was completed in 1914, and connected the newly-named capital to the existing railway line across the border, in Queanbeyan.

The station's proximity to the powerhouse explains its location but not how it came to be Canberra's only station. That's a slightly longer story, which starts with a disagreement.

Mark Butz knows the story well, he runs rail tours for the ACT Railway Historical Society and Engineering Heritage Australia.

"The people who originally thought about locating the city, which were surveyors mostly and some engineers, thought that would be the logical place to put the city — on the southside," he said

"That meant the [Kingston] railway station was in the perfect place to serve as the centre of the city."

Amy Lay, an exhibitions curator at the National Archives of Australia, had come across this too.

"Griffin had initially planned that his railway would go from the south to north … whereas the bureaucrats thought it would be better if it went through the south," she said.

"This is a problem because there's different ideas about how the city should look."

She believes that this could have had an impact on how Canberra's railway was funded.

Records show that Griffin's proposed railway line — a permanent line that would travel through the city and connect to Sydney and Melbourne via Yass — was costed multiple times, by the engineer-in-chief and even by Griffin himself.

Bureaucrats then suggested alternative rail lines, some of which didn't go as far as Civic or travelled through the south, deviating from Griffin's plans.

"They had about five or six different options, and of course the one that was most favourable to the bureaucrats was the cheapest," Amy said.

"The plan was, by 1915, not to bother with these permanent lines, temporary ones were decided upon."

What was built in 1920 was a temporary line that went from Kingston station, across the Molonglo River and onto Civic, terminating in Braddon.

Like the early Kingston line, it was designed to aid construction, this time in the city's north.

"Unfortunately, it [the train] crossed the Molonglo River on a fairly flimsy timber bridge," said David.

"About 18 months after it was constructed, a flood came down the Molonglo and wiped the bridge out."

Its destruction marked a turning point in Canberra's rail history.

"That event of the bridge going over really was the end of any hope of the railway line being extended to Kingston across to Russell and to Civic, and beyond," David explained.

A decade after the Kingston station was built, it became a "bona fide passenger line".

A longer platform was built in 1924 to accommodate passengers, and by 1927, a new station building was ready to welcome parliamentarians who were relocating from Melbourne to Canberra.

Many Canberrans have asked whether there was ever a train station in Civic, where Garema Place is today.

The answer is yes, and no.

"It certainly wasn't a railway station," said Mark Butz.

"It was simply an open platform that was at the height of the carriages that transported people and goods — so they could step out safely instead of clamouring down onto the ground."

If it still stood, Mark believes it would be in the middle of Garema Place, roughly where the concrete chess board is today.

The line didn't match Griffin's plans exactly because its primary function was to transport workers and building materials.

It picked up workers from a platform in Russell and brought them into Civic.

"This one here in Garema Place, that was very much a temporary thing," Mark said.

"In Griffin's plan, we would have a number of stations, including one here in Civic, which would be right in the middle of the Canberra Centre … that was going to be Civic station."

But Civic station wouldn't have been the city's central station.

"The actual railway itself was intended to go much closer to Mount Ainslie … with a big station under his big market building, which is pretty much where the Australian-American memorial is now."
High-speed rail?

On hearing the story of Canberra's railway lines, Beck couldn't help but laugh.

"I'm from Sydney originally, so I'm not surprised by any bad development decisions!"

Still, she wanted to know whether rail was still being discussed today, especially high-speed rail.

Earlier this year, the ACT Chief Minister called for a train service between Sydney and Canberra that would take less than three hours.

Even if a new rail project gets the go-ahead for the capital, a station in the CBD isn't guaranteed.

"The way the city's evolved now, I can't see anyway that there could ever be a full railway station in the city," Mark Butz said.

"If there was a rail link to the north, it would be much closer to the airport … where we've got the parkway and that transport infrastructure."
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Offline ozbob

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Re: NSW ACT Country & Freight Rail
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2018, 02:11:49 PM »
Newcastle Herald --> Newcastle to Sydney trains may lose an hour under fast rail plan

Quote
TRAINS between Sydney and Newcastle could be an hour faster if a business case the federal government has pledged to help pay for pans out.

The state government has won a share of $20 million in federal funding to help them investigate improvements to the link between the Hunter and the state’s capital. It is one of three rail projects from around the country chosen to be analyzed in greater detail by the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities.

The line crossing the Hawkesbury joins a link between Brisbane and the regions of Moreton Bay and Sunshine Coast, plus a proposal corridor linking Melbourne to greater Shepparton in those revealed on Friday to be progressing.

In a joint statement with Minister for Urban Infrastructure and Cities Paul Fletcher, Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack said the Hunter business case cash would be combined with funding from the state government to explore the upgrade’s feasibility.

“Once the business case for each proposal is complete they will then proceed to independent assessment by Infrastructure Australia,” the statement said. “If these proposals prove to be viable, they offer the potential to significantly reduce journey times on these key corridors—meaning better options for people who want to have the lifestyle of a regional centre but access to the job opportunities of a big city.”

Documents detailing the NSW government’s proposal for a business case indicate changes including better segregation between passenger and freight services, removal of level crossings and realigning the track to make trips faster between Newcastle and Sydney could save the hour on a trip that regularly reaches three hours.

“The NSW government has indicated that travel times between Sydney and Newcastle could be reduced from approximately three hours to two hours,” the document states.

An estimated cost is listed to “be confirmed in coming weeks”. Comment has been sought from Transport Minister Andrew Constance’s office.

The Property Council of Australia welcomed the inclusion of the Hunter’s link to the state capital.

“Both Newcastle and Sydney have growing populations and faster rail will mean people can move more easily between the two,” Property Council Hunter committee chair Neil Petherbridge said.

“A shorter travel time is critical to opening up housing and business opportunities for the Hunter region and means people who work in Sydney but live in Newcastle will face an easier commute.

“Faster rail will also make the Newcastle area more appealing for people to move to the region.

The NSW government proposal highlights the faster intercity link’s potential to “unlock housing supply and job growth” between the two cities as one of its main benefits.

Newcastle lord mayor Nuatali Nelmes said the business case, which also suggests a freight rail bypass for the region, was a piece of infrastructure the region deserved and one the council had affirmed its support for several times.

But she said she was wary of discussing the link as a commuter route, arguing instead it should bolster the Hunter’s own economic growth and help attract major organisations to headquarter here. 

“We shouldn’t be aspiring to be a commuter suburb,” she said. “It’s about increasing the connectivity to conduct our own business.”

Cr Nelmes said any freight rail bypass planning, including the business case, should plan the concept in conjuction with extending the M1 and the Richmond Vale rail trail.

Lake Macquarie mayor Kay Fraser said there were already strong commuter connections from her area that would strengthen with a quicker trip.

“We already have strong commuter connections with Sydney, particularly from  southern parts of the city such as Wyee and Morisset, so faster rail has the potential to significantly improve work/life balance by reducing travelling times and allowing people to spend more time at home,” Cr Fraser said.

“It will also encourage entrepreneurs to look to Lake Macquarie as a business location. They can set up here for a fraction of the cost of operating out of Sydney, and the improved rail link would allow them to draw employees from a larger catchment.”

Infrastructure Australia lists preserving a corridor for a future Newcastle freight rail bypass as a high priority initiative, indicating no business case yet exists for an opportunity potentially of national significance. 

The Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities said it would take between a year and 18 months to develop the Sydney to Newcastle upgrade’s business case, which will need to demonstrate how the upgrades would result in faster travel times.

“Completed business cases will be considered in the context of the government’s wider infrastructure priorities and future budgets, and any future funding commitments will take into account state and private sector financial support.”

Mr Petherbridge said he was hopeful the business case would be a step towards a concrete financial commitment towards upgrading the train line from both tiers of government.

“We would like a solid commitment from both the federal and state governments to fund improvements to the Newcastle and Sydney rail line and add some hard and fast timeframes to this project,” Mr Petherbridge said.

“Our only concern is that the proposal currently is for a business case only.

“Once the business case outlines the well-known benefits from improvements to travel times, we hope long-term financial commitments will be on the table.

A Transport for NSW spokesman said the investigation would consider “opportunities for integrated transport and land use outcomes for the Central Coast and Hunter”.

“The business case will also examine opportunities to maximise benefits from fleet upgrades, now and into the future,” he said. “At this stage we will consider the feasibility of a range of options to achieve faster travel times and assess them in the business case.” 
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Re: NSW ACT Country & Freight Rail
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2018, 03:03:05 PM »
https://twitter.com/PaulFletcherMP/status/993354247763705857
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Re: NSW ACT Country & Freight Rail
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2018, 03:33:22 PM »
https://twitter.com/PaulFletcherMP/status/993360543405633536
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Re: NSW ACT Country & Freight Rail
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2018, 11:48:24 AM »
Central Western Daily --> Full steam ahead: Petition calls for better train services



Quote
A push to introduce direct morning train services from Orange to Sydney has been strengthened after a petition was launched on Tuesday.

The Orange Rail Action Group is hoping that if 10,000 people sign the petition it will lead to NSW parliament taking action and introducing new direct train services at times when most people want to travel.

Action group chairman Dr Peter Bilenkij said the group wants one or two morning services running from Orange to Sydney.

Dr Bilenkij said ideally the Bathurst Bullet would be stabled in Orange and depart at 5.30am if tracks were upgraded.

However, without track upgrades he said it would have to leave at 4.30am.

He said the group would also like a new morning service from Dubbo as well as a return service in the afternoon, rail infrastructure upgrades to support fast passenger rail, which isn’t possible now due to some of the bends, and early commissioning of the new Regional Rail Fleet on the Main Western Line.

“We the community want fast passenger train services between Sydney and the Central West. We hope to see the new regional rail fleet in the Central West as soon as possible,” Mr Bilenkij said.

He said people including students, professionals and the elderly want changes to train services as do people who have moved from the Sydney to Orange but still want to go back for visits.

Member for Orange Phil Donato joined the action group members at the launch at Orange Railway Station and threw his support behind the initiative.

Mr Donato said he wanted to encourage population growth in the region and travel between Orange and Sydney was important when it came to encouraging more people to make the move.

“To achieve sustained population and financial growth we need improved passenger rail services to support decentralisation, tourist visitation and regional-metropolitan connectivity,” Mr Donato said.

Mr Donato said current travel options for travellers wanting to get to Sydney early in the day were not efficient and often involved people driving or catching a bus to Bathurst so they could catch the Bathurst Bullet.

He said this could be an issue for people with movement issues, luggage, children and people who want or need simple travel.

Dr Bilenkij said there were others who also drove and left their car at train stations in the Blue Mountains or transfer services in Lithgow if direct services did not run at the times they needed.

The petition can be signed at Mr Donato’s office in Byng Street during business hours and members of the action group will also be networking and taking the petition around to businesses and community groups.
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Re: NSW ACT Country & Freight Rail
« Reply #26 on: August 12, 2018, 10:14:00 AM »
^

https://twitter.com/Britt_Hughes9/status/1024180175460651008
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Re: NSW ACT Country & Freight Rail
« Reply #27 on: September 26, 2018, 04:37:19 PM »
Mailtland Mercury --> Coal train derailment closes Hunter line, buses between Singleton and Scone



Quote
Buses are replacing trains between Singleton and Scone on the Hunter rail line after a coal train derailment between Singleton and Muswellbrook.

Australian Rail Track Corporation confirmed an incident occurred on its Hunter Valley rail network at about 12.25pm on Wednesday.

“Wagons from a coal train have derailed (these have largely remained upright) and another coal train running in the opposing direction has struck these resulting in damage to the locomotive,” an ARTC spokesman said.

“Some wagons are on their side. There have been no injuries reported.

“Track damage has occurred, and repairs will be required, but the extent of these will be subject to further investigation as well as recovery and removal of the wagons and locomotives.”

The incident has been reported to independent transport safety investigators and the incident site is currently quarantined.

ARTC is unsure of when the line will begin re-operating.

Transport for NSW is advising regional train delays on its Sydney to Armidale XPLORER service and Moree to Sydney XPLORER service.

Passengers on those trains, which are stopped at Singleton and Muswellbrook, are expected be bused between the two stations and placed on the opposite train to continue to their destinations.

Transport for NSW is advising passengers to allow extra travel time, listen to announcements and check indicator boards for travel on the Hunter line.

Buses are replacing trains between Singleton and Scone.

Extensive delays are expected.
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